NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE
The official site of the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature

Sen. Dan Watermeier

Sen. Dan Watermeier

District 1

Six hundred sixty-seven bills and 5 proposed constitutional amendments were introduced during the bill introduction period, which is the first 10 days of the legislative session. This is close in number to the 655 bills that were introduced in both 2015 and 2013. I introduced 17 bills, ranging in subject matter from property tax relief to economic development.

The Legislature began discussing permanent rules this week. A rule containing a new technology use policy was approved. Although the Rules Committee did not vote to advance a proposed rule to change the method of selecting committee chairs from secret ballot to voice vote, an individual senator may still make such an attempt when the rules debate continues next week.

The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Mike Heavican, presented his State of the Judiciary address to the Legislature this past week. He touched on some of the challenges before the courts, including the lack of young lawyers in rural areas, which carries over to difficulty in filling judicial vacancies. He applauded the Legislature for the debt forgiveness plan for rural legal services passed in 2014. Chief Justice Heavican also noted the challenge of the increased need for interpreters so that involved parties can understand what is happening in our courtrooms. Much of his speech focused on justice reinvestment. Legislation was recently passed encouraging alternatives to incarceration in an effort to deal with the overcrowding problem in our prisons. However, proposed budget cuts suggested by the governor would reduce the number of probation officers and decrease funding for drug treatment. He warned the Legislature that if judges can’t be assured that probation is able to adequately supervise and rehabilitate offenders, they will choose incarceration. The chief justice pointed out that incarceration costs $35,000 for a prisoner compared with costs ranging from $3,000 to $10,000 to supervise an offender on probation.

The public hearing process began this week. In the Nebraska Legislature, every bill is guaranteed a public hearing, allowing Nebraskans to voice their opinion on the legislation introduced by senators.

I had three bills up for public hearing this past week. The first was LB 45, which would allow non-federalized reservists to be eligible for military honor license plates. I introduced this bill upon request of a constituent who had served in the army reserve for 10 years and had a service-connected injury. He was surprised to find out that he did not qualify for the plates. Under current law, members of the reserve must serve on active duty before they are eligible for a military license plate. Basic training or job training does not make them eligible. With the expanded eligibility proposed under LB 45, a reservist companion plate would be created for the current categories of U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and Air Force plates. The National Guard is already a reserve unit, so it doesn’t need a separate reservist plate.

LB 46, also a license plate bill, would provide for “Choose Life” license plates. The design is to reflect support for the protection of Nebraska’s children. Such plates would be available as alphanumeric or personalized message plates, with a maximum of 5 characters. A $5 fee would accompany the alphanumeric plates, which would be credited to the Nebraska Child Abuse Prevention Fund. For message plates, 75% of the $40 fee would be credited to the fund. This fund is used to award grants to agencies, organizations, and individuals for community-based child abuse prevention programs. The majority of states offer the option of “Choose Life” license plates, which allow motorists to express their support for pregnant women and the unborn.

LB 47 was introduced as a result of an interim study on unfunded mandates. Currently, counties are financially responsible for the costs of an autopsy, grand jury payments and witness compensation when there is a death of an incarcerated person. LB 47 seeks to transfer these costs from the county to the state for inmates that die while serving a sentence in a state correctional institution. I decided to introduce this bill since the Tecumseh State Correctional Institution is located in Johnson County, and it would help with some of their expenses. Johnson County must cover these expenses, even though the prisoners that have died at TSCI were not from nor arrested in Johnson County.

The Transportation and Telecommunications Committee has already advanced LB 45 and LB 46 from committee, and these bills will be discussed by the entire Legislature in the near future. LB 47 remains in the Judiciary Committee.

As the Legislature continues its work, I encourage you to contact me with your opinions of the legislation that has been introduced. I can be reached at District #1, P.O. Box 94604, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE 68509. My email address is dwatermeier@leg.ne.gov and my telephone number is (402) 471-2733.

Legislative Update

January 22nd, 2016

January 20 was the 10th day of the legislative session, which was the final day for bill introduction. In total, 446 bills and 8 constitutional amendments were introduced by senators and committees.

Supreme Court Chief Justice, Mike Heavican, presented his State of the Judiciary address to state senators this past week. He reviewed the work of the Office of Public Guardian, which was created by the Legislature in 2014 to improve the services provided to vulnerable adults in need of guardianships or conservatorships. He touched on the Through the Eyes of the Child Initiative, which focuses on education for judges, guardians ad litem, lawyers, HHS employees and community volunteers. The Chief Justice gave an overview of juvenile justice reform efforts, explaining that with the passage of legislation two years ago, children no longer have to become state wards to access services. He noted a significant increase in the number of children placed on probation and receiving services to reduce recidivism and likewise, a 7.6% decline in out-of-home placements in the past 6 months.

Last year, the Legislature passed LB 605, which created significant criminal justice reform. The court system is working towards implementation of the Justice Reinvestment goals outlined in the legislation. The court rules on post-release probation supervision have been adopted and locations were selected for new day and evening reporting centers. These centers average 6,000 visits from probation clients each month and provide services in every major community across the state. Every reporting center has a supervised substance abuse supervision program and Chief Justice Heavican noted that 89% of the clients released from the program in 2015 have been drug-free for at least one year and 91% are gainfully employed. The Chief Justice confirmed that they have now achieved their goal of developing problem-solving courts in each judicial district. Finally, he noted that total eFilings have increased, with the volume of electronically-filed documents in the trial courts up 30%, saving the court staff time and greatly increasing the accuracy of data entry.

Public hearings were held on three bills that I introduced this past week. The Transportation and Telecommunications Committee heard LB 732, which would allow reservists to qualify for Military Honor license plates. The way the law is currently written, only federalized reservists are eligible, which means that they had to serve on active duty that is not considered training.  I believe that these soldiers served their country, although in a time of peace, and should be eligible for the plates.

The public hearing for LB 734 was held before the Education Committee. LB 734 would allow non-resident members of the Nebraska National Guard to receive in-state tuition rates at state educational institutions. Although this proposal would only apply to a small number of student soldiers, it would make a significant difference in their cost of schooling.

LB 744 was heard before the Judiciary Committee. It deals with open adoptions. LB 744 recognizes that biological parents and adoptive parents can agree to communication and contact after the adoption of a child in private and agency adoptions, but makes it clear that the failure to comply with such agreement does not affect the legality of the adoption. The goal behind the legislation is to ensure permanency in adoptions.

Several of the bills that I introduced this year are the direct result of a constituent contact. I encourage you to continue to inform me of your opinions on legislation and suggestions for change. I can be reached at District #1, State Capitol, Lincoln, NE  68509. My telephone number at the capitol is (402) 471-2733 and my email address is dwatermeier@leg.ne.gov.

Sen. Dan Watermeier

District 1
Room #2108
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-2733
Email: dwatermeier@leg.ne.gov
Search Senator Page For:
Topics
Archives
Search Current Bills
Search Laws
Live Video Streaming
Find Your Senator