NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE

The official site of the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature

Sen. Mark Kolterman

Sen. Mark Kolterman

District 24

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at mkolterman@leg.ne.gov

Weekly Column – February 1st
February 1st, 2019

In last week’s column, I highlighted one of my priority bills for this upcoming session, LB 205 – Adopt the Surgical Technologist Registration Act.  Today, I want to bring your attention to another major priority of mine and of my colleagues.  As you may know, the Nebraska Advantage Act, the State’s largest economic incentive program, is set to expire in 2020.  If we allow the Nebraska Advantage Act to expire without a replacement, Nebraska will be the only state in the nation without a comprehensive economic development package to create higher paying jobs and to provide for more investment from companies within and outside of the state.

Before the legislative session began, representatives from the Nebraska Chamber of Commerce, Omaha Chamber of Commerce, and the Lincoln Chamber of Commerce approached me to introduce what would become LB 720 – Adopt the ImagiNE Nebraska Act.  I happily accepted the opportunity to carry this critical piece of legislation.

LB 720 will increase the value of the incentive program to the Nebraska tax payer through better investments, better jobs, more robust reporting and more overall transparency.  LB 720 will accelerate the value of the tax credit by simplifying the process, will increase the competitiveness of the program by increasing the Net Present Value of tax credits, thus helping Nebraska to win more projects and other opportunities for our state.  LB 720 will allow the State to build stronger relationships with businesses in order to encourage greater levels of investment and will allow the Department of Economic Development to better understand the needs of businesses and the evolution of business thinking in real time.

LB 720 is a critical piece of legislation.  I am very passionate in finding ways to lower Nebraska’s already high tax burden.  If we cannot provide a competitive package to attract businesses to invest or to even relocate to Nebraska, there will be no money available for any type of tax relief and there will be less money for education.  If we, as a state, do not provide business incentives I believe we will hurt the opportunities of our children and our grandchildren.  Due to the national and global competition for talent and well-paying jobs, hard times will fall upon this state if we do not find ways to grow our population and diversify the State’s economy.

While I introduced the legislation, I am not alone in this effort.  I am honored that 22 of my colleagues from all corners of the state and of all political persuasions have cosponsored LB 720 to ensure our state’s economic future in this ever changing global environment.  Having incentives to help grow our tax base is critical for our children’s future, for tax relief, and for job opportunities down the road.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Tyler and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance. Please continue to follow me on Facebook at Kolterman for Legislature and on Twitter at @KoltermanforLegislature.

The Health and Human Services Committee considered a bill Jan. 30 that would enhance training for medical professionals.

LB25, introduced by Sen. Mark Kolterman of Seward, would pay for additional training through the Patient Safety Cash Fund. Money for the fund would be generated by biennial fees of $50 for physicians and osteopathic physicians and $20 for physician assistants.

The fee would be imposed through 2025.

Kolterman said the bill would reduce the number of patients who are harmed through the negligence of health care professionals. He said the Heartland Health Research Institute estimated in 2016 that between 590 and 2,620 Nebraskans die each year from medical malpractice.

Kolterman cited an incident in which 99 patients contracted hepatitis C at a Fremont clinic where nurses used contaminated needles.

“All 99 went to the doctor for help, but came away with another deadly disease,” Kolterman said.

Katherine Jones, of the Nebraska Coalition for Patient Safety, testified in favor of the bill. The NCPS provides training to doctors, nurses and other medical professionals, but Jones said that training is limited to the organization’s 59 member hospitals. That coalition would expand if LB25 became law, Jones said.

“We health care professionals inadvertently harm patients because we learn very little about the nature of human error, systems-making and learning organizations in our training,” Jones said. “We must have a way to rapidly learn when technological innovation collides with human fallibility.”

Also speaking in favor of the bill was Britt Thedinger, president of the Nebraska Medical Association. He said that imposing a fee on NMA members would demonstrate the organization’s commitment to reducing errors.

“We see this as an investment,” he said. “We want to pay for this ourselves.”

Thedinger added that even with the potential added fee, the cost of a doctor’s license is much lower in Nebraska than it is in neighboring states.

No one spoke in opposition to LB25 and the committee took no immediate action on the bill.

 

Bill would fund improved doctor training

Standards sought for surgical technicians

 

The Health and Human Services Committee heard testimony Jan. 23 on a bill that would establish a registry and a minimum standard of competence for surgical technicians.

Sen. Mark Kolterman of Seward said he introduced LB205 because surgical technicians are the only members of a surgical team without a certification of their competency. Kolterman said he found that “unnerving.”

Surgical technicians perform a variety of duties, including sterilizing equipment, preparing operating rooms and passing instruments to doctors during surgery. There are about 800 surgical technicians in Nebraska, Kolterman said.

“I believe there is a specific and significant need for surgical technologists to be regulated by the state for the safety of our citizens,” he said.

Beginning in 2020, the bill would require that surgical technicians:
• be at least 19 years old;
• have a high school or equivalent diploma; and
• be of good moral character.

A surgical technician also would be required to document any felony or misdemeanor convictions when applying to the registry.

Casey Glassburner, president of the Nebraska State Assembly of the Association of Surgical Technologists, spoke in favor of the bill. Unqualified technologists can harm patients, she said, and those who have done so can move from job to job without being tracked.

“There have been instances in other states, specifically Colorado, where there have been surgical technologists that have performed actions potentially harmful to patients and they have moved between facilities,” Glassburner said.

Glassburner, who has been a surgical technician since 2005, said the estimated $50 annual fee would not be a barrier for technicians to enter the field. Fifteen states have such a registry administered by a board of medicine or a board of health, she said.

Crystal Livingston, an administrator at Doctors Outpatient Surgery Center in Lincoln, also spoke in favor of LB205. Livingston said that when hiring staff, she’s able to perform professional background checks on all medical professionals except for surgical technicians.

Most previous employers will not provide an evaluation of an employee’s performance, she said, leaving her unaware if an applicant previously had been fired for misconduct or incompetence.

Maggie Summerfelt, testifying in opposition, said she was unaware of any incidents in Nebraska in which a surgical technician had harmed a patient. Summerfelt, an administrator at Advanced Surgery Center in Omaha, said the bill would make it more difficult to become a surgical technician, a profession that already has low numbers.

“It’s not about safety,” she said. “I asked my [surgical] techs, and they’re all against it.”

Tiffany Weeks also opposed the bill. Weeks said she’s been looking to hire a surgical technician at Urology Surgical Center in Lincoln since December but has received less than five qualified applications. She added that when a surgical technician isn’t available, a nurse is called in, taking him or her away from other duties.

The committee took no immediate action on the bill.

Standards sought for surgical technicians

LINCOLN – State Senator Mark Kolterman of Seward has introduced legislation to rewrite Nebraska’s business incentives.  The bill is seen as a priority in the Legislature’s 2019 session since Nebraska’s current business incentives program is set to expire next year.

The “ImagiNE Nebraska Act” (LB 720) would revise and enhance Nebraska’s incentives by encouraging the creation of higher paying jobs and more investment from businesses already in Nebraska, as well as out-of-state companies.

Highlights of the new program are as follows:

  • Increase the value of the program to the Nebraska tax payer through better investments, better jobs, more robust reporting and more overall transparency.
  • Accelerate the value of the tax credit by simplifying the process.
  • Increase competitiveness of the program by increasing Net Present Value of tax credits – thereby helping Nebraska to win more projects and opportunities for our state.
  • Build stronger relationships with businesses in order to encourage greater levels of current and future investment.
  • Better understand the needs of business and the evolution of business thinking in real time via the Department of Economic Development (DED) application process and stronger relationships.

Kolterman said Nebraska is at a critical point in history and that the challenges are mounting.

“We have a workforce crisis,” the senator said.  “Our taxes are too high – both local and state taxes.  ‘Brain drain’ has returned.  We are failing to retain enough of our best and brightest.

“The national and global competition for talent and well-paying jobs is fierce.  If we don’t find ways to grow our population, diversify our economy, and expand opportunities for the next generation, tough times are coming faster than any of us would like to admit.”

Kolterman said the ImangiNE Nebraska Act is about the state’s future and “making sure our children and grandchildren have ample opportunities to live and work here,” while also “ensuring a viable future for smaller communities.”

Currently, there are more than 2,000 business incentive programs offered by state governments and U.S. territories.

“Nebraska cannot afford to take a timeout on incentives or lose ground in the effort to attract more good jobs,” Kolterman said.  “Just as the University of Nebraska’s football team needs four- and five-star recruits while developing its current talent, our state must continue to attract top employers while encouraging the growth of existing businesses.”

Kolterman noted that allowing the state’s business incentives to end with no substitute in place would be disastrous for Nebraska – akin to hanging a “closed for business” sign on the state’s front door.

“Nebraska must remain in the business recruiting-and-expansion game,” he said.

Kolterman concluded: “Like my colleagues, I’m passionate about finding a way to lower Nebraska’s high tax burden.  But no matter what reforms we might make this year or next, Nebraska will still have property taxes that are too high and income taxes that are too high for businesses looking to expand or relocate from elsewhere.  To level the playing field, we need competitive business incentives.  That’s not my viewpoint; that’s 21st century reality.

“If Nebraska cannot or will not provide a competitive package of business incentives, there will be no money for tax relief.  There will be less money to fund education.  It is time to end the uncertainty.  It is time to get to provide Nebraska with a new package of modern and timely incentives that recognize the way business is conducted today.”

Weekly Column – March 23rd
March 23rd, 2018

Last week we celebrated National Ag Week, which gave us the opportunity to recognize the unsung heroes of our State – the farmers and ranchers. It also allowed Nebraskans to recognize the important role that agriculture plays in our everyday lives. On Monday, I joined Governor Pete Ricketts and two of my colleagues, Senator Lydia Brasch and Senator Lou Ann Linehan, at the Pioneer Hi-Bred seed-corn plant north of York. We were also joined by several students from the Agronomy Academy.

Later Monday, I had the opportunity to attend the Seward County Agriculture Recognition Banquet, helping them celebrate the 50th year of their event. It was a great evening, hosted by the Kiwanis Club, the Seward County Agriculture Society, and the Seward County Chamber and Development Partnership. One thing that was especially impressive was the number of FFA students who attended to assist with the meal. These kids are the future of agriculture in our state and District #24, and I was so pleased to see such a vibrant group. I appreciated the opportunity to host Governor Ricketts, Director of Nebraska Department of Agriculture Steve Wellman, and Chair of the Legislature Agriculture Committee Senator Brasch. They all work tirelessly to support and promote agriculture in Nebraska. Congrats to the award recipients – Roy, Dave, and Doug Cast and Families, Bill White, and the many scholarship winners: Bailee Tucker, Colton Hackbart, Andrew Cast, Molly Suhr, Kane Aegerter and Riley Kamphaus. Agriculture has been such an important part of my family’s heritage. It was great to see so many residents of Seward County celebrating agriculture.

It is hard to believe that last Friday was the forty-eighth day of the 105th Legislature session. With only twelve days left in the Legislative session, we still have a lot of priority bills to debate. On Tuesday, we debated a Nebraska Retirement Systems Committee priority bill, LB1005. It addresses the withdrawal of an employer from the County or School retirement plans, which are administered by the State. LB1005 ensures that the withdrawing entity would be financially responsible for all costs to the plan so those costs do not fall on state taxpayers or other plan members or employers. During the floor debate the bill was amended to include several other minor retirement bills. LB1005 eventually advanced to Select File on a 38-1 vote.

During Wednesday’s debate, the Legislature advanced an amended version of the bill creating a super-two rural highway classification and changing the maximum highway speed limits, LB1009. The bill no longer includes a provision to increase the speed limit on the Interstate System to 80 miles per hour. LB1009 would authorize the Nebraska Department of Transportation (NDOT) to do the following:

Increase speed limits from 60 mph to 65 mph on any four-lane divided highway that is not a part of the state highway system and any part of the state highway system other than an expressway or freeway;

Increase speed limits from 65 mph to 70 mph on expressways that are part of the state highway system and freeways that are part of the state highway system but not part of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways; and

Increase speed limits from 60 mph to 65 mph on any portion of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways located in Douglas, Lancaster and Dakota counties.

It is important to note that NDOT will not raise speed limits unless it is supported by a traffic and engineering study. LB1009 advanced to Select File on a 35-2 vote.

Also on Wednesday, the Legislature failed to advance the mainline budget bill, LB944, during an extensive second-round of debate, due to a filibuster led by opponents to a provision of the bill restricting the distribution of Title X funds to health clinics that also provide abortion services. Failing to adopt this provision could jeopardize approximately $1.9 million Nebraska receives in Title X funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. An attempt to pass the budget on Friday also failed to overcome the filibuster. It is frustrating that we were unable to approve a budget bill that advanced out of the Appropriations Committee unanimously. I am confident that the Legislature will reject the Washington-style politics that has stalled the budget and adopt it before we adjourn.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Todd and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance.

March 9th – Weekly Column
March 9th, 2018

The Legislature wrapped up the fortieth day of the session last Friday. With two-thirds of the short legislative session complete, it was the first week of full-day floor debate. We debated several bills, ranging from increased child safety seat requirements to exempting horse massage from State regulation to creating a new sovereign city in the Nebraska panhandle.

Last Wednesday, the Legislature debated the bill I introduced on behalf of the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, LB702. It updates Nebraska’s Child Support Enforcement Program to comply with new federal regulations by clarifying that children covered by Medicaid and other needs-based health care programs have health care coverage. LB702 also modifies how child support orders are handled when a parent is incarcerated for more than 180 days. Failing to comply with the mandated changes by October 1, 2018, would subject the state of Nebraska to the loss of $81 million in federal IV-D child support and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funding. LB702 advanced to Select File on a 38-0 vote.

Also on Wednesday, the Legislature gave second-round approval to LB44 and it advanced to Final Reading on a 34-7 vote. LB44 would require some retailers without a physical location in Nebraska to collect state sales and use tax, pending a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June. I supported this legislation because I do not believe it is fair to local retailers that are required to collect sales tax, while out of state online retailers do not have to collect it. This legislation levels the playing field for ‘Main Street’ businesses and allows them to compete with online retailers.

There was a lot of activity last Thursday. My priority bill, LB439, advanced to Final Reading on a 30-0 vote. This is the bill that would allow nurses employed by an assisted-living facility to provide health care services to residents. The Legislature also advanced LB1090 to Select File. Introduced by Senator Smith, LB1090 would nullify the effects of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 had on Nebraska state income taxes. It would prevent a tax increase of an estimated $220 million.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Todd and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance.

March 2nd – Weekly Column
March 2nd, 2018

As most of you know, one of the unique characteristics of the Nebraska Legislature is that every bill introduced by a senator receives a public hearing. On Tuesday, February 27th, we concluded committee hearings for the 468 legislative bills and 9 constitutional amendments introduced this year. The legislature began full day debate on bills on Wednesday, February 28th. With 23 days remaining in this short legislative session, we still have a lot of important legislation to tackle, including rebalancing the two-year biannual budget.

One of the bills I have been hearing about from constituents is LB1009, a bill that provides a super-two rural highway classification and changes maximum highway speed limits. Upon being introduced by Senator Murante, LB1009 was referred to the Transportation and Telecommunications Committee, of which I am not a member. According to the Nebraska Department of Transportation (NDOT), the State Highway Commission requested a review of rural speed zones in response to concerns about the consistency of speed limits across Nebraska.

First, LB1009 adds a new classification for highways that already exist across Nebraska. These are two-lane highways with passing lanes spaced intermittently on alternating sides of the highway to provide opportunities to pass slower moving vehicles. LB1009 would also increase the speed limit on highways by 5 miles per hour and allow the NDOT to increase the speed limit on the interstate from 75 to 80 miles per hour should a traffic and engineering study support it. The Transportation and Telecommunications Committee recently advanced LB1009. Since Senator Hughes prioritized it, we should be debating LB1009 on the floor soon. I am interested in learning more about the rationale for raising speed limits when LB1009 is debated on General File.

Also on Wednesday, the Nebraska Economic Forecasting Board increased its revenue projections for the current fiscal year and next year by about $55 million over its October forecast. The revenue forecast for the next fiscal year FY2018-19 increased $365 million. This includes an estimated $335 million increase in individual income and corporate tax receipts as the result of the federal Tax Cuts and Tax Jobs Act of 2017. LB1090, introduced by Senator Smith, is intended to offset this increase. I will work with my colleagues to prevent this big tax increase.

Last Thursday, March 1st, marked the 151st anniversary of President Andrew Johnson signing the presidential proclamation declaring Nebraska’s statehood. Nebraska was the 37th state admitted to the union and the first after the Civil War. The United States Congress voted to admit Nebraska provided that suffrage was not denied to non-white voters. The bill was vetoed by President Johnson, but it was overridden by a supermajority in both Houses of Congress. To this date, Nebraska is the only state admitted to the Union by means of a veto override.

Every year, the NEBRASKAland Foundation hosts the Statehood Day dinner in the State Capitol Rotunda to recognize Nebraskans who have distinguished themselves and the state. The honorees this year included former University of Nebraska President James B. Milliken, former Governor and U.S. Senator E. Benjamin Nelson, and my twin brother Clark Kolterman.

Clark has dedicated his life to giving back to Seward through his work teaching at Seward High School and the leadership roles in various nonprofit, community and civic organizations. Clark was instrumental in revitalizing the Seward Fourth of July celebration. His leadership efforts helped Seward receive the official designations as Nebraska’s Official Fourth of July City from Governor J.J. Exon and later as America’s Official Fourth of July City – Small Town USA by a resolution of Congress.

It’s hard to imagine the Seward Fourth of July without Mr. Fourth of July himself. It’s been a joy to watch him thrive in leading the celebration for so many years and get so many different people involved. No one more deserving of the Distinguished NEBRASKAlander Award than Clark.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Todd and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance.

January 26th – Weekly Column
January 26th, 2018

The first full week of the legislative session started with a winter storm that threatened to shut down the legislature. While a handful of my colleagues were unable to make it to the Capitol, Monday’s blizzard was no match for our determination to forge ahead with the peoples’ business of governing. I am grateful for all the road crews from the cities, counties and State who worked long hours to keep our road and highways open. We were fortunate that there were only a handful of serious accidents across Nebraska. And in these situations, Nebraska’s first responders, police, fire and emergency workers, stepped up to aid those in need.

We had several hearings this week on legislative bills I introduced, including two before the Health and Human Services Committee. First, LB 701 updates statutes to support existing telehealth practices in Nebraska. We all know that access to health care practitioners is critically important to the citizens of Nebraska, especially those in medically underserved areas of our state.

The other hearing was on LB 702. I introduced this bill on behalf of the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. It updates Nebraska’s Child Support Enforcement Program to comply with new federal regulations. The State of Nebraska would lose over $81 million in federal funding if it fails to comply with the mandated changes by October 1, 2018.

The bill I introduced on behalf of Champion Homes had a hearing before the Urban Affairs Committee. LB707 would allow third-party agencies to inspect manufactured homes produced in York. The Nebraska Public Service Commission currently inspects these homes to insure compliance with U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standards. It is important to make this change because the inspection fees assessed by the Public Service Commission are more than four times the inspection fees charged by HUD certified third parties. Only ten other state agencies in the country provide this service. Most other states – including those surrounding Nebraska – allow HUD certified third parties to inspect manufactured homes. LB707 would allow Nebraska companies that manufacture homes to compete on a level playing field with out-of-state manufacturers.

The Legislature’s Revenue Committee held the first public hearing on several major tax reform proposals. LB829, commonly referred to as the 50/50 Tax Plan, would provide Nebraska’s property tax payers with an income tax credit equal to 50 percent of the school property taxes they pay. It would offset about 30 percent of the average taxpayers’ total property tax bill. The legislation does not answer questions about how to pay the $1.1 billion price for the proposal. The Revenue Committee will also consider several other proposals in the coming weeks. I know taxes are an important issue to all Nebraskans, and I will work diligently to find solutions to our tax challenges.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Todd and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance.

January 19th – Second Week
January 19th, 2018

The second week of the legislative session was a short week as we recognized Martin Luther King Jr. Day. This year, the third Monday of January would have been Dr. King’s 89th birthday. With the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights leaders’ assassination this April, we realize the significant contributions Dr. King made in his short lifetime.

Thursday was the tenth and final day for bill introduction this session. There were 468 legislative bills and 9 constitutional amendments introduced this year. During this short 60-day session, it is unlikely that most of these bills will make it to floor debate without being prioritized by a Senator or Committee. A bill may also advance on the consent agenda, if it is not controversial and lacks opposition.

We also heard from Chief Justice Heavican on the State of the Judiciary on Thursday. He reported on efforts to make the state’s court and probation systems more effective. Chief Heavican also provided an update on new problem-solving and re-entry courts.

Last week, one of my colleagues introduced the Irrigation Tax Act, LB 1022. If enacted, farmers would pay a one cent tax for every 10 gallons of ground water used for irrigation. The proceeds would fund the School Aid Fund. Since it generates revenue, this legislation was referred to the Legislature’s Revenue Committee. While I do not serve on this Committee, please know that I strongly oppose this legislation and will work with my colleagues to defeat it should it make it out of the Committee.

This year I introduced thirteen bills including four dealing with retirement issues. Below is a summary of the bills I introduced. Please visit the Nebraska Legislature website if you would like more information about each bill at: www.nebraskalegislature.gov.

LB 698   Changes the Public Employee Retirement Board’s regulation-making authority to permissive for all the plans its administers

LB 699    Technical clean-up bill to insert language omitted from LB 415, which passed last year

LB 700    Removes the obligation of the Nebraska Investment Council to invest the University Trust Fund which is overseen and managed by the University of Nebraska

LB 701 Amends the Uniform Credentialing Act to establish a physician-patient relationship through telehealth

LB 702 Recognizes children covered under Medicaid and other needs-base health care programs

LB 703 Addresses a gap in our medical practice statutes to recognize physicians licensed in another state traveling to Nebraska accompanying a team for an athletic competition or other event

LB 704 Reduces the period of board approved post-graduate medical education requirements for individuals who attended foreign medical schools

LB 705 Changes licensure requirements for an esthetician and an esthetician instructor

LB 706 Clarifies licensing requirements for electrologists

LB 707 Changes provisions of the Uniform Standard Code for manufactured homes

LB 799 Clarifies language in the Surplus Lines Insurance Act

LB 1005  Establishes liability and costs for an entity that elects to withdraw from the County or School Employees Retirement Plan

LB 1127 Creates the Patient Safety Cash Fund

We are continuing to debate bills on General File from last year. Most of the debate this week involved LB 469, the Fantasy Contests Act, and LR 18CA, a constitutional amendment that would decrease the age of eligibility for public office. Both bills were filibustered and received extensive debate. They were both eventually defeated and are finished for the year.

As always, if we can be of assistance to you in any way, please do not hesitate to contact my office. My door is open and I have made it a goal to be accessible to the constituents of our district. Please stop by any time. My e-mail address is mkolterman@leg.ne.gov, and the office phone number is 402-471-2756. Todd and Katie are always available to assist you with your needs. If I am not immediately available, please do not hesitate to work with them to address any issues that you may need assistance.

The Clerk’s Office of the Nebraska Legislature is Now Accepting

Applications for Legislative Page Positions

 

The application process for selecting pages for the 2018 Legislative Session is now underway in the Clerk’s Office at the Nebraska Legislature. Legislative pages are local college students employed by the Legislature to respond to senators’ requests for assistance on the Legislative Floor, answer incoming calls to the Legislative Chamber, and possibly assist in committee hearings.

The deadline for submitting an application is Fri., September 29th at 5:00 pm. A letter of recommendation from your state senator is encouraged. College students from District 24 requesting a letter of recommendation from Senator Kolterman should contact our office at (402) 471-2756 or mkolterman@leg.ne.gov.

Applications are available at the link below (PDF) or from the Clerk of the Legislature’s Office, Room 2018, State Capitol, 1445 K Street. For further information on the application process, please contact the Office of the Clerk of the Legislature at (402) 471-2271.

 

Legislative Page Application 2017

Sen. Mark Kolterman

District 24
Room #2004
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-2756
Email: mkolterman@leg.ne.gov
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