Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments – March 27, 2014

March 27th, 2014

Capital Comments

Senator John Wightman

District 36

 

With only ten working days remaining of the sixty day session the Legislature has been very busy on major legislation. This week my comments will report on three of the many controversial bills debated:

  • L.B. 1092 which authorizes the use of bonds to finance highway construction, which I support.
  • L.B. 916 to eliminate written practice agreement between physician and nurse practitioners, which I did not support; and,
  • L.B. 526 that will allow optometrists to perform minor surgery and use certain pharmaceuticals, which I support.

L.B. 1092 would authorize the use of bond financing to accelerate the completion of highway construction projects. L. B. 1092 was introduced by Senator Dubas, Chair of the Transportation and Telecommunications Committee. Of the 50 states, only Nebraska and Wyoming have not allowed some bonding for highway construction since the construction of the original interstate highway system. The bonds would be repaid with revenue from the State Highway Capital Improvement Fund, which currently receives 25 percent of the state’s sales and use tax. To secure the debt, L.B. 1092 would pledge the revenue from all fuel taxes, motor vehicle registration fees and other highway user fees for the purpose of debt repayment. The interest rates are currently very low on such bonds and construction costs are increasing at rates of inflation that are higher than the interest rates on debt. It was argued that putting money into highway construction will put money into the economy and support jobs.

L.B. 1092 was changed by a committee amendment to reduce the amount of authorized debt to a maximum of $200 million from a maximum of $400 million, as originally provided in the bill. The amendment also reduces the time period during which the Highway Commission may issue bonds to two years and requires that the bonds carry a fixed interest rate which may be no higher than five percent. The bill advanced with 32 votes after overcoming a filibuster by Senator Chambers of Omaha.

L.B. 916 is a bill that was introduced by Senator Crawford of Omaha that would eliminate the currentrequirement for a nurse practitioner, to have an “integrated practice agreement” with a physician. Nurse practitioners have more training that a nurse and can perform more clinical tasks.It would remove the requirement that a nurse practitioner complete a minimum of 2,000 hours of practice under the supervision of a physician. Under L.B. 916 the nurse practitioner would be required to have only a “transition to practice agreement.” The supervising provider could be another nurse practitioner and that nurse practitioner may have only 10,000 hours of clinical experience

I am a supporter of physician directed primary health care. The physicians receive more training and are required to have a training residency which offers far more clinical experience than a nurse practitioner. I did not support L.B. 916, but it advanced with 29 affirmative votes based upon the prevailing argument that the current limitations are not needed and nurse practitioners do not have such restrictions in many other states, including several neighboring states.

L.B. 526 was introduced by Senator Howard of Omaha to allow optometrists to perform minor surgery and use additional pharmaceuticals. These minor surgeries have been allowed in the past to be performed only by ophthalmologists, who are medical doctors. Only four counties in the entire western half of Nebraska have resident ophthalmologists. The bill was opposed by physician and physician groups. The Health and Human Services Committee advanced the bill with an extensive amendment to clarify and narrow the language of the bill. The bill was further amended to require optometrists who perform minor surgical procedures or who administer injections to provide a standard of care to patients comparable to that provided by physicians licensed in this state to practice medicine and surgery. Based upon the information provided to me, it is my position that L.B. 526 will require the necessary training to safely provide these services, and will increase access to these minor surgical services in western Nebraska at a reasonable cost.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others during this year’s legislative session. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for the Week of March 10, 2014

March 13th, 2014

 

 

The Unicameral has had another busy week. On Monday and Tuesday the full legislature debated the main budget bills that had been proposed by the Appropriations Committee on which I serve. That committee basicly spends the afternoons of about sixty percent of the full legislative days in determining the state’s proposed budget.

On the floor after debate of approximately a day and a half, the budget proposed by our committee received its first round approval. Although there may be proposed changes on select file these are usually not successful. The budget of the Appropriations Committee left approximately 90 million dollars for bills passed by other committees, but hopefully all of this will not be spent.

Among the items in the budget, of interest to all property owners is a provision that will add 25 million dollars to the Property Tax Relief Fund, which will result in an annual amount of 140 million dollars, an increase from the previous annual relief fund of 115 million dollars. Readers should realize that property taxes are not received by the state, but by local governments, mostly schools, counties and municipalities (cities and towns). This state fund directly pays the County Treasurer to relieve the property tax payer.

A second item of interest not only to irrigators in central Nebraska, but the interests of all water users around the state was a 21 million dollar budget increase to the Water Sustainability Fund to study and develop projects to increase the state’s use of water flowing through the state and largely into the Missouri River. One such dam will be located on the south side of the Platte River between Lexington and Overton.

Also 14 million dollars would go to the state to alleviate over crowding the states’ prison population which is currently at approximately 150% of maximum capacity.The State of Nebraska may face a lawsuit if prison overcrowding is not addressed.

Another bill, L.B. 987, introduced by the Revenue Committee, received approval on general file and would index and expand state income tax brackets for all taxpayers but mostly for lower income taxpayers.The bill also would reduce the amount of Social Security benefits that are included in the federal adjusted gross income (AGI) for state income tax purposes. The adjustment would apply to taxpayers with an AGI of $58, 000 or less for married person filing jointly and $43,000 or less for all other returns. The bill will reduce the state’s revenues by an increasing amount each year as more of the state’s population will be reaching retirement age.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others during this year’s legislative session. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for February 20, 2014

February 20th, 2014

 

On Friday we will have reached the 30th day and have completed the first half of this session. On Wednesday, the general session was shortened to less than one hour, so that various committees could meet and vote more bills to the floor. The Appropriations Committee has now heard all of the various legislative bills before it and is moving towards getting its bills to the floor.

Among the bills we heard on the Appropriations Committee this week were two bills that would create a water sustainability fund. These were L.B. 940 by Senator Ken Schilz, that would appropriate 50 million dollars from cash reserve funds (the state’s savings account) for creating water sustainability projects and L.B. 1046 by Senator Carlson of Holdrege, Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, that would transfer 50 million on an annual basis from the state’s general fund (tax dollars) to assist Natural Resource Districts to begin planning and the construction of dams to allow the state to make more use of the water that flows through the state. The bills drew support from natural resource districts, conservations groups and public power districts who emphasized the need to address keeping and increasing Nebraska’s future water supply for agriculture, industry, and cities. This past year a substantial amount of water flowed across and out of the state from Colorado in the South Platte River and could have been retained had there been additional dams on the Platte River to capture the water.

The Appropriations Committee also heard several bills, L.B. 1074 by Senator Al Davis of Hyannis, L.B. 1086 by Senator Pete Prisch of Omaha and L.B. 669 by Senator Beau McCoy of Omaha that would use state funds to reduce property taxes using the current Property Tax Credit Cash Fund. The amounts to be funneled to this fund ranged from 115 million dollars in Senator Pirsch’s bill, 85 million dollars in Senator McCoy’s bill and 25 million dollars in Senator Davis’s bill. The impact of the three bills is put in perspective that for a $150,000 house, Senator McCoy’s L.B. 699 would provide an additional credit of $73; $99 would be added by Senator’s Pirsch’s bill and $12 by Senator Davis’s LB 1095. Senator McCoy’s and Senator Pirsch’s bills were opposed by a think-tank organization called the Open Sky Policy Institute and the Nebraska Education Association. They questioned if any of the cash reserve should be spent considering the state needed 792 million dollars to balance the budget during last recession and even after budget cuts. The current projection of the level of the cash reserve is 726 million dollars in 2014-15.

Personally, I would prefer to see a reduction in the valuation of agricultural land from 75% to 65% of market value, since the average increase is our area will probably exceed a 15% increase in the past year. The Nebraska Farm Bureau, in support of lowering the value of agriculture land, has published data that only two states, California and Texas receive a greater total of property taxes from farm land, and that Nebraska has a much higher tax rate than most neighboring states. Their information also shows that farmers pay 26% of total property taxes in the state, although they make up only 3% of the state’s population. There are at least two bills, L.B. 670 and L.B. 813, that would have accomplished the reduction in ag land valuation to 65%, but it appears at this time that neither of these bills will get out of the Revenue Committee.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others during this year’s legislative session. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for February 12, 2014

February 13th, 2014

 

 

As I write this column, we have finished with eight hours of debate on L.B. 393 introduced by Senator Bloomfield that would have changed the motor cycle helmet law so that riders over the age of 21 would be able to ride without a helmet. L.B. 393 received 25 votes but needed 33 votes to stop the filibuster of the bill. In the seven years I have served in the Legislature this is the fifth time the bill to change the helmet law has failed to advance.

The Legislature has started to debate a very important bill, L.B. 438, that was introduced by Speaker Adams and past chair of the Education Committee. The intent of the bill is to begin to make K-12 schools accountable for their performance and for their use of state and local tax dollars. It is a concept that is hard to argue against but difficult to do in legislation. The details will be decided by the Department of Education. Legislative Bill 438 would require the State Board of Education (State Board) to categorize public school and school district performance, beginning with data from the 2013-14 school year. The State Board would be required to designate up to three schools from the lowest performance category as priority schools. Thus a “priority” school district really means a school district that is branded as an academically poor school district. An intervention team would be established for each priority school. The intervention team would assist school and district officials in developing a progress plan to improve student performance at the priority school. District compliance with the progress plan would be required to maintain accreditation.

This bill has far reaching implications for economic development, because businesses would be reluctant to locate in a town with a poor performing school. The devil is in the details but what we know is it raises concerns for school districts, like the Lexington Public School district, that continues to experience an influx of English as a second language students that live in financially poor households. These students are clearly high need. Last year, the Lexington Pubic School enrolled 73 new high need students from all over the world. This is in addition to the English as a second language and high need students already in the system from prior years. It is recognized that it takes six to nine years to become proficient in a second language. L.B. 438 proposes to use a testing system that only gives English as a second language students one year before they must take the required test. Such students have to be at a disadvantage.

The second major concern is that the current evaluation system gives more weight to performance than it does to performance improvement from year to year. If the school is doing its job, the student becomes more proficient in English and his or her test scores improve, that school should not be branded as a poor performing school.

The Nebraska Department of Education has formed a task force to provide input into the calculations used in assigning the designations. Fortunately, John Hakonson, Superintendent of the Lexington Public Schools has agreed to be a member of this task force. Mr. Hakonson recognizes that he must advocate for schools that have a disproportionate share of high need students to make the system fair. Mr. Hakonson has committed to keep me informed about the development of the ranking system so that any necessary changes can be proposed.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others during this year’s legislative session. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for May 30, 2013

May 30th, 2013

Capital Comments

Senator John Wightman

District 36

As I write this column, the first session of the One Hundred Third Legislature is nearing completion. One week from today (Thursday) we will probably be in our first day after the close of the session, unless the Speaker postpones for a day or two the final working day of the session to consider overrides of the Governor’s vetoes.

The Legislature on Tuesday considered overrides of the Governor’s line item vetoes of the mainline budget bills and overrode the vetoes on most of the items. The budget bill is brought to the full Legislature from the Appropriations Committee on which I have served during my seven years in the Legislature.

Yesterday we had final reading on a number of spending bills, and with the passage of most of them, it is likely that several of these bills will also result in vetoes, and probably overrides will be considered by the Legislature on some or all of these bills. Generally these bills are a little less likely to be overridden because they do not necessarily have the support of a majority of the members of the Appropriations Committee.

Today the Legislature voted favorably on L.R. 155, a Resolution submitted by Senator Chambers, to create a Tax Modernization Committee. This is probably one of the most important actions taken by the Legislature this session. The Tax Modernization Committee, which will be made up of 15 members, will hold hearings during the summer and fall and before mid-December prepare a report on their study of the entire tax system of the State of Nebraska as well as other governing bodies, including cities, counties and school districts. The report will include recommendations as to what changes should be made or considered as to our tax system.

Among the items to be considered will no doubt include the Governor’s bill, which he proposed in L.B. 405 and later withdrew. That bill would have eliminated the state income tax and eliminated many of the exemptions from sales taxes, which could have a great impact on farmers and manufacturers. If you have a great interest, which most of you in agriculture do, you will want to follow the meetings of the Tax Modernization Committee during the summer and fall of the forthcoming year. If you let me know about your interest, my office staff and I will try to keep you informed as to the meetings of this committee. As soon as the membership of the entire committee is finalized, which will be early next week, I will inform you as to the makeup of the committee. Senator Galen Hadley, as chair of the Revenue Committee, will be the chair of this committee.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others during the final days of this year’s legislative session. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for May 16, 2013

May 16th, 2013

 

As we finish this week, we have 11 legislative days remaining for the ninety day session. The present week has brought the budget bills forwarded by the Appropriations Committee to final reading which will probably occur next Monday.

The first two days of the this week were taken up by debate on the death penalty. The bill would have changed the penalty of death to a life sentence without the possibility of parole. The bill failed to receive the 33 votes necessary for cloture to cease debate. It appears that if the vote on athe bill itself had taken a majority of the 49 Senators would have supported repeal. Personally, I still support the death penalty, but I do believe it will likely be repealed in the next few years.

Legislative Bill 634 introduced by Senator Davis of Hyannis passed select file and will be up for final reading next week. The bill will fund forest fire prevention and control, partly by providing the availability and use of a firefighting aircraft. The bill will also provide fire prevention in areas of the state that have over growth of cedar trees by providing state matching funds to property owners who thin these trees. I believe that the western half or more of the state has a greater risk of forest fires this summer than probably it has ever faced before. This is caused in part by the overgrowth of cedar trees in pastures and canyons in the state.

Another bill of interest to me was L.B. 308, introduced by Senator Schumacher, which would eliminate a portion of the state income tax know as the alternative minimum tax. Since I have spent a fair amount of my time over the past 50 years doing tax work and tax preparation, I have a working knowledge of some of the unfairness of the alternative minimum tax as it is applied to Nebraskans. Some people who have sold farm land in Nebraska have paid several thousand dollars above the maximum income tax rate. This is because taxes on their capital gains, which were already taxed at the state’s highest rates, became subject to the additional rate of the alternative minimum tax. I think that this portion of the tax should be eliminated. Unfortunately there have been several amendment proposed to L.B. 308, which may make it difficult to get it passed.

I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for May 9, 2013

May 9th, 2013

Capital Comments

Senator John Wightman

District 36

As I write this on Thursday morning, the legislature has spent almost two-thirds of this week‘s session debating the budget bills. Although we have spent almost two and one half days, we are now on the third of the seven bills that make up the budget package proposed by the Appropriations Committee. This is by far is the most time spent in general session on the budget bills in my seven years in the Legislature. Today there will probably be at least 10 hours of discussion. Nevertheless, it is hard to argue that the budget is not one of the most important issues to come before the Legislature annually.

Several major issues have come to the floor in an attempt to amend the budget bills proposed by the Appropriations Committee, on which I serve. We have spent the last several hours discussing property tax relief, although the state gets no part of the property tax. I am sure that it will come as a surprise to many that the State of Nebraska does not share in the property tax revenues, as it is all levied by the school districts, the villages, municipalities and the counties and pays no part of the state’s expenses. Over the years the state has mademany efforts to relieve property taxes by giving money back to local governments who use the money to relieve property taxes. The state provides approximately $1.3 billion per year in aid to local governments such as for K-12 education, aid to community colleges, Educational Service Units, etc.to provide relief to property tax payers across the state. As we continue, I am quite certain that all of this week will be taken up by the remaining bills submitted by the Appropriations Committee and proposed amendments to the bills

We have both a legislative bill, L.B.613, and a Resolution, L.R. 155, still to be taken up by the entire legislature to have a committee study our overall tax structure for the State of Nebraska during the summer with a report to be completed by December 15th. In the meantime, I feel that is is better to await that report before further state aid to property tax payers is considered.

It appears that next week a good deal of time will be spent on reconsideration of the death penalty. The issue has come before the Legislature almost every two years in my seven years in the Unicameral. Although under our current state and federal laws and court decisions the state definitely spends more to enforce the death penalty than we would spend if it is eliminated, I will once again vote against repeal. I continue to believe it is at least a partial deterrent of premeditated murders in our state.

Your input will be very important to me especially since this year’s session will develop the state’s budget for the next two years in addition to all of the other issues that impact you as a citizen of the State of Nebraska. I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for April 11, 2013

April 11th, 2013

As I write this column on Thursday, the Legislature has just closed for the week. The Appropriations Committee on which I serve has spent considerable time this week and the last several weeks trying to reach a consensus on expenditures that will be allowed during the next two years that will keep the Legislature and State government within the budget requirements.

The Legislature spent much of its time debating L.B. 44, which would set time limits on minors who had been sentenced to life imprisonment. This was necessary under a trio of United States Supreme Court decisions, Miller vs Alabama, Graham vs Florida and Roper vs Simmons, with the latter case expressly holding that life sentences without parole imposed upon minors is unconstitutional. There are 26 prisoners who were minors when they were sentenced to life in Nebraska, two of these cases were from Lincoln and Gosper Counties. The Judiciary Committee recommended a minimum of 30 years, which under state law would have authorized a prisoner to be released on parole after 15 years. After much debate including a number of amendments the bill finally received a majority vote on general file with a compromise of 40 year minimum. It is likely that the bill will be finally passed at this level.

 

Also on Thursday we spent two hours on L.B. 579, a bill brought by Senator Karpisek as Chair of the General Affairs Committee, to authorize employment by the State Patrol of up to 15 new officers to enforce liquor laws in the state, and specifically to try to gain more control on minors obtaining liquor. The committee had reduced the number to 10 new officers, and after much debate, it appears that the bill will probably be reduced to an increase of 5 officer who will not be limited to reinforcement of liquor laws. This bill will come back for further debate next week.

Much of the remaining days of the session will be spent on additional funding to be committed to education and health and human services, the latter largely related to federal laws on health care.

Your input will be very important to me especially since this year’s session will develop the state’s budget for the next two years in addition to all of the other issues that impact you as a citizen of the State of Nebraska. I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for April 4, 2013

April 4th, 2013

Capital Comments

Senator John Wightman

District 36

As I write this letter we are on the 54th day of the legislative session, which will complete sixty percent of this year’s regular session. Without doubt we have moved more slowly through bill consideration and floor debate than we have done during my previous six years in the Legislature. Obviously this slowing down of the process has resulted from the return of Senator Ernie Chambers to the Legislature after a four year absence resulting from term limits. Although Senator Chamber was in the Legislature during my first two years, he seems to be even more active in slowing down the process this year than in my first two years, perhaps making up for the four years he was away by reason of term limits.

One important bill that was advanced from general file was L.B. 634, introduced by Senator Al Davis of Hyannis that would direct the Nebraska Forest Service to contract with private aviation companies to place two single engine air tankers at airport sites near Chadron and Valentine during the fire season to fight fires. The bill further provides for:

  • thinning of forests to reduce the likelihood of fires and reduce fuel loads to reduce risk to residents, property and firefighters,
  • providing expanded training programs for volunteer firefighters, private landowners and communities in order to increase fire suppression effectiveness and safety,
  • Developing a Nebraska-based incident management team to serve as a resource to help manage large wildfire operations,
  • expanding the federal excess property programs managed by the Nebraska Forest Management Service to convert additional surplus military fire fighting equipment for use by volunteer firefighters; and,
  • rehabilitation of forest lands that have been destroyed by wildfires.

It is my own thought that the likelihood of fires throughout the state is probably the highest this year than it has been since the 1930′s. The risk is probably well beyond the 1930′s within District 36 and west for the reason that pasture areas have an accumulation of red cedar trees that gets worse annually.

Another bill of interest to livestock producers is L.B. 423 of the Agriculture Committee which would change the seizure provisions of the Livestock Animal Welfare Act to allow certain animals to be euthanized by law enforcement officers if the animal is in extreme suffering or injured, disabled, or diseased past recovery for useful purpose. Law enforcement would be held to make reasonable accommodation of an owner’s request that a veterinarian of the owner’s choosing be present during examination and assessment of animals, but that attempts to accommodate such request shall not delay necessary euthanization for more than 24 hours.  

Your input will be very important to me especially since this year’s session will develop the state’s budget for the next two years in addition to all of the other issues that impact you as a citizen of the State of Nebraska. I look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many others. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capital, District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402) 471-2642. My email address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

 

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Senator Wightman’s Capital Comments for March 14, 2013

March 14th, 2013

Capital Comments

Senator John Wightman

District 36

Senator Chambers is back. While no one on the legislative floor doubted it, it has become more evident during the past week and a half, when he filibustered a proposed amendment to the Nebraska Constitution, L.R. 41 CA which finally passed the first round of debate with a 28 to 19 favorable vote.

The purpose of the Constitutional amendment is to grant the Legislature the authority to pass legislation that allows the wagering on replayed horse races on machines at horse racing tracks. The issue took almost four and a half days of debate on the floor.

This week is the deadline for all 49 Senators to make one bill his or her priority bill for the rest of the session. In addition each of the standing committees and a few special committee are entitled to prioritize up to two bills, and the Speaker can prioritize 25 bills, so their will be about 100 bills which will have priority designations Probably these priority bills are about the only bills, plus the budget bills, that will be heard the rest of the session.

I have selected L.B. 487 as my priority bill. This bill was introduced on behalf of Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital where I spent about 100 days as a patient during the past three years. The bill would allow Madonna to move about 40 of its existing rehabilitation beds to Omaha, although it would not increase the number of total beds within the state. It does not apply only to Madonna, otherwise it would be unconstitutional as special legislation. For those readers who have not had the good fortune-probably not so good fortune of personal experience,- Madonna is one the leading care homes in the central part of the nation in providing care for stroke victims and for victims of serious brain injuries. Although the facility provides care for a number of patients from out-of-state and from the Omaha region, state law controls the number of rehabilitation beds and patients Madonna can serve, and where they can serve them. Other types of hospital and nursing home beds can be moved from location to location under current law as long as the number of beds is not increased.

Debate on priority bills started on Thursday of the week and will continue though the remainder of the session. This means that bills heard on the floor for the rest of the session will likely be more significant and newsworthy than many of the bills debated during the first part of the session. Also, the budget for the state for next two years will receive priority on the agenda.

Your input will be very important to me especially since this year’s session will develop the state’s budget for the next two years in addition to all of the other issues that impact you as a citizen of the State of Nebraska. look forward to receiving your input and the voicing of your concerns as we address these issues and many  others. Please contact me at my Lincoln office in the State Capitol District 36, Box 94604, Lincoln, NE 68509. My phone number is (402)471-2642. My e-mail address is jwightman@leg.ne.gov.

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