NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE
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Sen. Sue Crawford

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at scrawford@leg.ne.gov

Bills Debated and Advanced

This was a productive week in the Legislature. While the committees work to discuss and advance new 2018 bills in the afternoons, we have been able to use the mornings to debate a number of bills that were not given priority status last year, but which are still important to consider. This is known as taking up bills on “worksheet order”, which means we discuss them in the same chronological order that they are approved by committees. As senators and committees begin to designate 2018 priorities, we will have less time to discuss worksheet order bills.

One of my bills, LB 78, was advanced to the second round of debate on Tuesday; LB 304 and LB 96, another two of my proposals, were advanced to the final round of debate on Friday.

We also spent some time discussing my bill LB 589. The intent of this legislation is to provide child victims and witnesses in a felony cases with additional protections from pre-trial depositions if a videotaped forensic interview has been conducted by a professional with specialized training at a nationally accredited child advocacy center. With 73% of child victims in Nebraska being 12 years of age or younger, we have a duty to be sensitive to the trauma caused by these children continually repeating or being questioned about a traumatic event central to a criminal case. Some of my colleagues raised concerns about the burden of proof this bill would put on the defense to access depositions. I worked with my colleagues on an amendment that addresses some of these concerns while still protecting our most vulnerable children. This bill will be back on the agenda for Tuesday morning debate and it is my hope that we can advance an amended version of the bill to the next round of debate.

Workforce Development Meeting

On Friday, I joined the Coalition for a Strong Nebraska, the ACLU, the Holland Children’s Movement as well as my colleagues Senator Laura Ebke and Senator John McCollister to talk about workforce development in the state. In order to grow Nebraska’s economy and give workers the opportunity to thrive, we have to think critically about how to support workers and help them develop their skills.

During this meeting we discussed my bill, LB 844, which provides employees who work for an employer with four or more employees with up to one week of sick and safe leave every year. Nearly half of Nebraska workers do not have access to paid sick leave.

Worker access to paid leave benefits Nebraska and our workforce by: enhancing public health with less people going to work with contagious illnesses; helping family caregivers to balance family and work responsibilities; and enhancing productivity and reducing turnover at businesses.


With Sarah Ann Kotchian, Vice President of Public Policy at the Holland Children’s Institute

Crawford Bill Hearings

This week I had two bill hearings. The first, on Tuesday, was on LB 764 in the Agriculture Committee. I do not have many bills referred to that committee, so it was an enjoyable change from my usual routine! The Legislature has been working hard to remove barriers to employment through occupational licensing reform. It is critical that the state continue to pursue innovative approaches that allow all Nebraskans to earn an income. LB 764 is a “cottage food law” that would allow Nebraskans to sell foods already authorized for sale at farmers’ markets to customers from their homes. It only seems logical that consumers be allowed to buy these same foods, produced in the same conditions and with the same labels from their neighbors at any time of the year.

The second hearing this week was back in the Health and Human Services Committee. LB 894 would bring Nebraska into the Recognition of EMS Personnel Licensure Interstate Compact (REPLICA). Like other compacts, LB 849 eliminates red tape and allows licensed and qualified EMS personnel to provide care in another member state under certain circumstances without having to obtain additional licenses. REPLICA also validates our commitment to veterans and their spouses by creating an expedited pathway to licensure in member states.

The committees have so far taken no action on LB 764 and LB 894, but you can check back on the bill webpages any time for updates.

Committee Bill Work

As I mentioned above, the Committees are still hard at work. On Monday, the Banking, Commerce and Insurance Committee heard a LB 683 which allows for active duty military members and/or their spouses to be licensed realtors in Nebraska without having to pay the licensing fee, provided they have a valid realtor’s license in another state. This is one of many bills that was introduced this session to eliminate barriers for military families to enter the Nebraska workforce.

On Tuesday the Urban Affairs hearing discussed a bill to allow any municipality to create a land bank, rather than just municipalities in Douglas and Sarpy counties as current law requires (LB 854). My office studied the issue of land banks and abandoned property over the 2017 interim, so it was good to see this issue addressed. The Committee advanced the bill to the full legislature on a unanimous vote at the end of the week. Tuesday also marked the beginning of public hearings for the Appropriations Committee, which will consider budget requests and recommendations for every state agency between now and mid-February before making their final budget proposal to the full Legislature.

On Wednesday the Judiciary Committee had a long day discussing bills related to juvenile justice. The bills they heard addressed issues such as rules for juvenile room confinement in a custody (LB 870) and what the membership makeup of the Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice should be (LB 670).

Thursday’s biggest draw was LB 829, which would bring major changes to property taxes in Nebraska. The Revenue Committee heard several hours of testimony, both from those who feel property tax relief must be prioritized above all else, and from those who are deeply concerned about how such drastic reform would impact state budgets and potentially cause tax increases in other areas. You can read more about the arguments for both sides in the Journal Star here.

The Health and Human Services Committee on Friday had a public health focus. Among other issues, we talked about whether under-18s should be permitted to visit tanning salons (LB 838) and how the state can better train child care providers and others who care for small children about safe sleep and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome (LB 717). In addition to public hearings, the Health and Human Services committee had several briefings this week on issues related to Child Welfare including case loads and workforce training for Child Welfare workers. These front line workers are critical to protecting child safety.   

As always, the Committees heard about far more interesting, important bills than I am able to discuss here. For a full picture of what was discussed each day, check the Legislature’s committee calendar here.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Bills Introduced This Week

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of this week were the final days to introduce bills for the 2018 session. In total, there were 467 bills and 16 substantive resolutions (plus 19 resolutions to express congratulations or sympathy) introduced in the second half of this 105th Legislature.

The bills I introduced this week are:

LB 1020 – This bill clarifies a policy that we passed last year on how and when municipalities can directly borrow from banks for purchases. The bill clarifies that a city can borrow for up to a seven-year window, and clarifies the cap on the amount that can be borrowed in this manner.

LB 1055 – The Intern Nebraska program provides grants to reimburse Nebraska businesses that create paid internship positions for high school students, college students, and recent graduates.LB1055 is an effort to ensure that funding for this important program is available in years to come. Considering more than half of young people who participate in an internship become full-time employees where they intern, financing this program in a sustainable way will help ensure that young people studying in Nebraska will continue to be connected with and employed by local businesses.

LB 1073 – This bill calls for The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)  to include in their weekly report to the Foster Care Review Office information on whether relative and kinship foster placements are licensed or have been issued a waiver for licensing standards. In order to maximize federal IV-E foster care payments under federal law, it is critical that the state know how many of these homes are meeting IV-E licensing requirements before our CMS waiver that allows these homes to receive payments without licensure expires in 2019.

LB 1078 –  This bills calls for DHHS to report to the Health and Human Services Committee of the Legislature any sexual abuse allegations, screenings, and substantiations concerning state wards and youth at residential facilities in the state. Allegations of sexual abuse of a state ward, juvenile probationer, juvenile in detention, and juvenile in a residential child-caring agency would also have to be reported to the Office of the Inspector General for Child Welfare (OIG). This bill came as recommendation from the 2017 Child Sexual Abuse Report issued by the OIG that was rejected by DHHS. You can read the full OIG report here.

LB 1117 – This bill would increase Nebraska’s tax on cigarettes by $1.50, from its current $0.64 to $2.14. It would also increase the tax on snuff and other tobacco products. Particularly as we enter the second consecutive year of fiscal shortfall, it is critical that we consider additional sources of revenue. Raising the cigarette tax has broad support among Nebraska residents, and would provide an important influx to the state’s General Fund. Spending cuts are important to discuss in times of fiscal constraint, but should never be the only option on the table. Cuts can only go so far before we risk hurting Nebraskans and the state’s growth. LB 1117 offers a sensible alternative.

State of the Judiciary

On Wednesday the Chief Justice of the Nebraska Supreme Court, Michael Heavican, attended the Legislature to give his annual State of the Judiciary address. One of his key points was to highlight the initial work of Nebraska’s new problem-solving courts (such as drug courts and veterans’ courts). He also discussed the serious problems the court system will face if they experience drastic cuts this session as the state tries to balance its budget. The court system is not alone in that concern, which is why bills like my LB1117 on the tobacco tax, and other creative sources of revenue, are so important to the discussion.

Public HHS Briefings

The Health and Human Services committee, of which I am a member, held a series of public briefings this week on a range of DHHS issues. Our briefings this week included ways the Division of Public Health and Division of Behavioral Health have attempted to address the opioid epidemic, and a discussion of the Developmental Disability waiver process. These briefings are a helpful avenue to check in with the leadership in DHHS’ various departments, and to bring up any concerns we have with the department or its programs.

Next week there will be three more briefings on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, which you can watch live here; each will begin at 1:00 pm. The topics will be: the Office of the Inspector General for Child Welfare’s recent report on sexual abuse of youth in state care, which I linked to above, on Wednesday January 24th; a discussion of DHHS caseworker caseloads on Thursday January 25th; and an update on healthcare workforce initiatives on Friday January 26th. While we will not be taking public testimony during these briefings, I encourage you to send any comments or questions you may have to my office so that I can review them and, if appropriate, bring them up during the briefings.

Committees Begin

On Tuesday we had our first public bill hearing of the year. One of my bills, LB 865, was on the agenda in the Urban Affairs Committee. I discussed LB 865 last week (read that update here if you need a refresher), and am proud to say that the Urban Affairs committee advanced it to the full Legislature on a unanimous vote that very same day. We also discussed bills about AirBnB and other short-term rentals (LB 756), municipal student loan support (LB 719), and other issues.

We also heard a variety of bills in the HHS Committee. Those included a measure by Senator Carol Blood to adopt the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Compact, which would help military families and others to practice more easily, but still safely, in Nebraska (LB 687); bills to allow for mobile cosmetology and nail salons (LB 790) and change training requirements for estheticians (LB 705) and electrologists (LB 706); and a proposal to require healthcare professionals to take continuing education courses on opiates (LB 788).

Other committees were just as busy. On Tuesday the Education Committee heard a bill to provide low-income students with free meals at school (LB 771). The Judiciary Committee spent Wednesday talking about Corrections, including prison overcrowding (LB 675 and LB 841) and staffing (LB 692). The Revenue Committee considered two bills related to the inheritance tax on Thursday (LB 881 and LB 882), and on Friday took up two suggestions to change the process of protesting property tax assessments (LB 885 and LB 905).

The sheer variety of bills that have hearings on any given day shows just how many ideas and proposals senators introduce each year. Because we cannot be experts on every topic under the sun, it is vital for interested citizens and organizations to share their experiences and knowledge with us at these public bill hearings. To see the full list of which bills the Committees are hearing each day, check the Legislature’s calendar here.   

BPSF Soup Cook-Off

The 6th Annual Bellevue Public Safety Foundation Soup Cook-Off will take place from 5:00-8:00 pm on January 26th. Head over to the Bellevue Volunteer Firefighters’ Hall to try tasty soups and vote for who takes home the coveted Golden Ladle Award! Check out the Bellevue Leader’s article about this year’s event for admission details and other information.

Bellevue Library Legislative Coffee – February 17th

Please also mark your calendars for 10:00 am on February 17th, when the Bellevue Public Library will host its first Legislative Coffee event of 2017. Senator Blood and I will be there to talk about the legislative session and our bills, and to answer any questions attendees may have. I hope to see you there!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Bills Introduced This Week

This week was Day 4 through 7 of the 2018 session. Since this is the second year of the session, we have bills carried over from last year to debate during the first 10 days of bill introduction. I introduced five new bills this week. Next week we have three more days to file any remaining legislation to be considered for the year. Expect a flurry of new bills towards the end of the week! Senators sometimes save bills that they do not want to get as much attention for Day 10, so it is fun to see what bills Senators drop on the last day.

My new bills are:

LB 894 authorizes Nebraska to be a participating state in the EMS Personnel Licensure Interstate Compact (REPLICA). As a member state, licensed Nebraska EMS personnel will gain the ability to practice in other participating states and those licensed in other REPLICA states will be able to provide services in Nebraska. All participating states are required to meet background check and safety standards to ensure quality care. There are currently 11 states participating in the compact including three of our border states: Colorado, Kansas, and Wyoming.

LB 926 extends the military vehicle registration exemption currently in place for out-of-state activity duty military to Nebraska residents who are currently on active duty and spouses.

LB 973 requires that maps that become part of legislative debates for drawing election district lines only use state-issued computer software. This is one small step to reduce partisan consultant influence by making it more difficult for partisan consultants to use mapping to create partisan advantages and get those maps introduced in the legislature. In 2021, with information from the 2020 Census, state legislatures across the nation will draw new state legislative districts and Congressional districts. In Nebraska we also draw the lines for the University of Nebraska Board of Regents, Public Power districts, and the State Board of Education. Unfortunately, partisan majorities in state legislatures can draw these lines to create unfair advantages for candidates of their party, often called gerrymandering. The process for drawing these district lines can influence whether the elections will be competitive and fair. LB 973 is just one of multiple bills introduced this session to shape this process. I hope that we get some of our other redistricting bills to pass (LB974 — Sen. Vargas [adds criteria for the existing process]; LB975 — Sen. Howard; LB216 — Sen. Harr; LB653 – Sen. Murante) but LB 973 provides at least one step that we could get into statutes regardless of other changes in the redistricting process.


Senator Vargas, Senator Howard and I preparing to introduce our redistricting bills

LB 979 establishes that Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners can provide expert medical testimony on issues related to their expertise (scope of practice in state policy terms).

LB 996 proposes four changes in our largest tax incentive act (the Nebraska Advantage Act). Most of the changes seek to ensure that jobs created by these tax incentives are good-paying ones. The bill requires that the jobs created to earn the benefits must be full-time jobs that each pay above the county average wage. The bill also seeks to control the long-term cost of the incentive by phasing out one of the benefits designed to be an important early benefit for recipients. Currently, this benefit continues as other earned benefits kick in. The bill proposes that this early benefit (the ability of the company to keep the state income tax withholding for new employees) remains in place for three years and then phases out by the end of five years.

Motorcycle Helmet Repeal & Other Bills Debated

This week my colleagues and I were able to make good progress on bills that were passed out of committee last year, but which did not make it on the agenda due to time constraints. Since we have not begun the committee process to approve this year’s bills, the first two weeks of session are an opportunity to spend time on a few of those carry-over proposals.

On Tuesday my LB 304, which updates our state Public Housing Authority rules, was advanced to the second round of legislative debate, known as Select File.

On Wednesday the Legislature engaged in extended debate on LB 368, a bill to repeal Nebraska’s mandatory helmet laws for all motorcycle riders. The bill failed to pass the first round of debate as supporters were unable to garner 33 votes to end debate.

Human Trafficking Prevention

Human trafficking is a serious issue in Nebraska, which the Legislature has worked with the Attorney General’s office to address. On Friday dozens of senators, Governor Ricketts, the AG, and other stakeholders joined together at the Capitol to announce the Demand an End initiative, a public awareness campaign to address sex trafficking of minors in our state. An important part of the initiative is a “Buyer Beware” focus on cracking down on the buyers in sex trafficking.


Standing with other Senators as Attorney General Doug Peterson the Demand an End campaign

Hearings Begin Next Week

As a reminder, committee bill hearings begin on Tuesday January 16th. In Nebraska every bill introduced receives a public hearing in one of the Legislature’s 14 standing committees. Anyone can come to testify during these hearings. The introducer of the bill speaks first to explain the bill. Committee members then have a chance to ask questions of the introducer. Then, those who wish to support the bill have time to speak, followed by those who wish to speak against the bill. Finally, those who wish to speak in a neutral capacity speak. In most committees testifiers have three or five minutes to testify. Committee members may ask questions of testifiers as well. The introducer gets a chance after all testifiers are finished to “close on the bill,” which provides an opportunity to respond to the testimony and make a final case for the bill to committee members. In most cases five to ten testifiers speak. However, an important Nebraska tradition is to let anyone come to testify and to do our best to accommodate everyone who wishes to speak by staying as late as necessary to accommodate those who come.

I have my first bill hearing on our first day of hearings, on Tuesdayafternoon. I will present LB865, which forbids cities from waiving second and third readings for ordinances dealing with annexation and redistricting, but instead requires that these ordinances have all three readings on three different days (for most ordinances, state law allows a city council can waive the second and third readings of ordinances by a supermajority vote of the council members). Requiring all three readings ensures that citizens have the full opportunity to participate in the debate on these critical ordinances that impact elections in our cities. The idea for this bill came from the experience of one of my friends, Autumn Sky Burns, who spent much of last year preparing to run for a Papillion City Council seat. In early December she learned that new districts were passed in one city council meeting, as the members voted to waive the second and third readings to pass the new districts in a single meeting. These new district lines put her in a different district. The city leaders wanted to act quickly to get a newly annexed area into districts for the next round of elections. Under LB 865 the city would be required to hold three different readings of the bill on different days, but the council could set special meetings to get the three readings in quickly. This bill builds on a law passed in 1994, which was introduced by Senator Paul Hartnett. That bill established restrictions on cities across the state (except Lincoln and Omaha) against waiving second and third readings of annexation ordinances.

Hearings typically begin at 1:30 pm each day that the legislature is in session, and will run through the end of February. Usually a committee will hold hearings on 4-6 bills each afternoon.

You can browse the hearing schedule and check out daily legislative agendas here. Live streams of all debate and committee hearings are available through NET’s online service here.

Chief Standing Bear Sculpture at the Captiol

The Ponca Chief Standing Bear was a Nebraska icon who fought for Native Americans to be treated equally under the law. This fall, a larger-than-life statue to Chief Standing Bear was unveiled to complete the renovated Centennial Mall in Lincoln. You can learn more about the statue and its unveiling from the Lincoln Journal Starhere. It is a fitting tribute to a extraordinary man, who was unfailing in his pursuit of justice for his people in the face of staunch resistance and intense personal loss.

This week on Wednesday, a small ceremony and reception were held at the Capitol to welcome a miniature version of the statue for temporary display. If you happen to be at the Capitol before January 23rd, I invite you to visit this smaller version in the cafeteria to learn about a great Nebraskan. The Centennial Mall statue is a permanent fixture, which you can visit any time.


(L-R) Senators Halloran and Linehan, me, Senator Pansing Brooks, Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs Executive Director Judi gaiashkibos, and Senators Brewer, Lowe, and Erdman

Sarpy Chamber Legislative Coffee

On Friday, which was our first recess day of the session, I joined the Sarpy County Chamber for their inaugural 2018 Legislative Coffee. These events are always an enjoyable way to engage with Sarpy businesses and residents about the legislative session and our priorities, and receive feedback in return.


Speaking to attendees at the legislative coffee

Sarpy County Election Commission Swearing-In Ceremony

Also on Friday, I attend the ceremony at which Michelle Andahl was sworn in as the new Sarpy County Election Commissioner and Deb Davis as the returning Chief Deputy Election Commissioner. I look forward to working with both of them!


Michelle Andahl takes the oath of office


Deb Davis takes her oath of office

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislative Session Begins

The 2nd Session of the 105th Legislature formally convened on Wednesday of this week. We began with a few opening formalities, including the swearing-in of a new Chief Sergeant at Arms, Jim Doggett. We also welcomed a new colleague to the body: Senator Theresa Thibodeau, who was appointed in October to fill former Senator Joni Craighead’s seat.  

Though there are fewer big opening events for short sessions, many senators invite friends, family, or other guests to the Capitol for the first day. This year my husband and both sons were able to join me. Their support has been invaluable as I enter my sixth year of legislative service.


In the Capitol rotunda with my sons Nate (L) and Phil (R), and husband David

Time Change for Military Spouse Teacher Licensure Hearing

The December update included information about a Department of Education hearing on military spouse licensure (full details here). That hearing will take place on January 25th, but the time has now been changed – the hearing will take place at 1:00 pm rather than 10:00 am. I still encourage anyone interested to attend, and wanted to make sure you know about the time change.

Crawford Bills Introduced

The three session days this week were devoted just to introducing bills. During that time I introduced six bills. I will elaborate about each of my bills as they come up for public hearing, but to give you a preview:

LB 764 allows Nebraskans to sell many of the items that they can already sell at farmers’ markets to customers from their homes if they do not make more than $25,000 a year on these sales.  

LB 839 expands state disclosure rules for organizations that spend money on ads that specifically target a candidate in the 60 days prior to an election. This requires reporting for election-related materials that would not be covered under our current reporting requirements. If groups are pouring money into Nebraska campaigns, our citizens and candidates have a right to know who they are.

LB 844 requires employers to allow employees to earn paid sick leave to take care of themselves or a family member if the employer doesn’t already provide sick leave or paid time off. In a recent survey, over ¾ of Nebraskans favor policies that expand paid sick leave. (Nebraska Values Project, Holland Children’s Institute, 2017).

LB 865 – prevents municipalities from waiving second and third readings of ordinances by vote if the ordinance concerns redistricting or annexation. Currently, state law prohibits cities of the first class (like Bellevue and most Sarpy cities) and smaller cities from waiving the second and third readings for annexation ordinances. The bill makes sure that on these major city issues citizens will be able to know that a second and third reading will occur if they wish to be present.

LB 866 – provides a mechanism that ensures that the Health and Human Services Committee of the Legislature is informed in a timely manner when the Department of Health and Human Service makes major changes to our Medicaid program through waivers. This notification ensures that the Legislature can respond if necessary before the waiver goes into effect. Waivers are special agreements with the federal government that can change who qualifies or what services are provided. Recent federal changes have opened up greater possibilities for waivers that might have major impacts on our programs.  

Finally, I introduced LB 867 to increase accountability and performance in DHHS’ three Medicaid managed care organizations, collectively known as Heritage Health.  The bill addresses a couple of issues that have repeatedly been raised in our oversight hearings.


Turning in my first bill of 2018 to the Clerk of the Legislature

Senators have ten working days total to introduce bills at the start of each session, which means new proposals may be introduced through January 18th this year. However, our deadline to submit bill drafts is January 12th, so most bills are already in progress. You can find out the status of any bill by searching for it at nebraskalegislature.gov. You can look at the full list of the bills introduced this session here.

Legislative Procedures and Schedule

Starting on Monday of next week, we will begin debating a motion to adopt permanent rules to govern the 2018 session. It is my hope that this debate will be a short one, so that we can move on to the business of the bills before us for the session.

Committee bill hearings will begin the afternoon of Tuesday January 16th (Monday the 15th is a holiday for Martin Luther King Jr. Day). Except in rare circumstances, committees must post notice of all bill hearings no later than 7 days before the scheduled date. Thus, the first hearing notices should be posted no later than Tuesday January 9th. Hearings typically begin at 1:30 pm each day that the legislature is in session, and will run through the end of February.

You can browse the hearing schedule and check out daily legislative agendas here. Live streams of all debate and committee hearings are available through NET’s online service here.

Economic Development Task Force

Friday morning the Economic Development Task Force invited all senators to discuss our 2017 report (read the report here). This informal meeting was an opportunity to talk about the report and its recommendations with senators outside the Task Force. We will continue those conversations in 2018, and expect to begin taking up our 2017 recommendations, as well as exploring new economic development avenues, this summer after the 2018 session adjourns.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislature Resumes January 3rd

The 2nd session of the 105th Legislature will begin next week on January 3rd. As in all even-numbered years, the upcoming session will be sixty days long (you can see the tentative 2018 calendar here). This email also marks the last monthly newsletter before we transition back to sending out updates on a weekly basis, so that you can receive the latest news about what is happening in committee hearings and on the legislative floor.

We’ve been working over the interim on several bills that we will discuss in our updates next session as we introduce them. The topics include: protecting our children from sex abuse; allowing entrepreneurs to sell food from their home that they can currently sell at farmers’ markets; expanding opportunities for our best and brightest to work in internships in Nebraska; allowing workers with no paid time off or sick time from their employer to be able to earn sick leave time to take care of themselves and their family; bills to strengthen accountability measures to help us continue to push our new Medicaid system (Heritage Health) to improve; bills to protect our children in our child welfare system; and bills to reduce licensure barriers to careers in the state (while still protecting public safety). Of course, I will also be working with my colleagues on bills that will be good for our district and the state, and fighting against bills that threaten our future. I look forward to another session of working for you!

Teacher Licensing for Military Spouses

Spouses of active duty military members face a number of unique challenges, and in my time in the Legislature it has been one of my priorities to support policies that alleviate those challenges. One such example affects spouses who are teachers. Moving frequently from base to base can make it extremely difficult to obtain or retain a teaching license, since many states have disparate requirements and not all of them recognize existing licenses from other states. The Nebraska Department of Education (NDE) recently announced that they have finalized and given initial approval to a rule change to help military spouses past that barrier.

The draft rule change, which would create a special class of licence known as the Military Teaching permit, can be found here (the relevant section begins on page 20). NDE will hold a public hearing on this proposed rule Thursday January 25th at 10:00 am, at the NDE’s offices in the State Office Building in Lincoln – 301 Centennial Mall South. If you are able to attend and would like to comment on the proposal, I encourage you to attend.

This proposed rule change has come about thanks to the hard work of several individuals, particularly Shannon Chandler Manion, wife of 55th Wing Commander Col. Michael Manion, who dedicated a great deal of her personal time to the effort. NDE has also been a helpful and responsive partner, without whose cooperation and active investment the change would not have moved forward. Senator Carol Blood has also been a consistent voice for policies like this one that help military families live the most normal lives possible while their loved ones serve.

Protecting our Kids

Project Harmony is a Child Advocacy Center with a mission to end the cycle of child abuse and neglect. Project Harmony supports child abuse victims and collaborates with law enforcement, social services, and medical professionals to work for the best outcomes for survivors. On December 7th I toured their Omaha offices, which serve Douglas and Sarpy Counties and a portion of western Iowa. I look forward to working with these dedicated individuals to advance child welfare in our state.


Meeting with several Project Harmony staffers at their Omaha offices

Protecting our children is a critical obligation for all of us. I have two bills from last session that I will continue to push in 2018. One protects 16- and 17-year-old kids from sexual abuse from persons of authority, such as teachers, coaches, and foster parents. The bill stipulates that consent is not a defense in this situation. Currently Nebraska children of this age do not have this protection. The other bill protects children who have suffered abuse, and have told their story to a trained forensic interviewer on tape, from additional pre-trial deposition questioning unless the defendant can make the case that it is essential for their defense. This change does not take away the rights of the accused during trial, but protects these children from the trauma of retelling their story unnecessarily and having their story questioned by a defense attorney before the trial without a judge present. The child advocates at Project Harmony, the Nebraska Alliance of Child Advocacy Centers, and the Nebraska CASA Association all supported this bill last session.

We have a special obligation to protect the children who are under our care in our foster care system. Unfortunately, we learned with two reports near the end of the year that we have much work left to do to protect these kids in Nebraska. I have been working with Senator Bolz, Senator Howard, and child advocates from across the state to identify some bills that could help strengthen our child welfare system. We plan to meet with other senators from both parties in the first week of the new year to build a coalition of senators who will take on some important changes in the system.

Hwy 75 Farm Implement Meeting

If you’ve been south of Bellevue on Highway 75, you’ve seen all the construction underway. After the construction is done, Hwy 75 will be a freeway through that area. One of the consequences of the freeway designation is that farm implements would normally not be allowed onto the road. However, since Hwy 75 is the only crossing over the Platte River for several miles, we have been talking with the Department of Transportation about the need to make allowances for farm equipment in the area.

On December 13th, we worked with the Nebraska Farm Bureau to organize a meeting to allow farmers and implement dealers in the area to provide input on a draft plan to allow farm equipment to be on Hwy 75 for a short span with permit. Thanks to The Lodge for hosting us! The draft of the permit rules are available here; comments and suggestions can be sent to our office. I am happy to forward your comments to the Department of Transportation.

Economic Development Task Force

The Economic Development Task Force spent six months exploring existing research and hearing from state economic development experts, businesspeople, education specialists, and others. Our goal was to formulate a better understanding of what Nebraska’s economic landscape looks like now, and what the state’s priorities should be to foster more effective development in the future.

From that work, the Task Force created a report for 2017 that must be submitted to the Legislature. Once it is publicly posted – which should be January 2nd – the report will be available here under the “Select/Special Committees” tab. I welcome any feedback you may have.

We’ve been working on bills to tackle some of the key priorities of the report, including attracting and retaining our best and brightest and improving our economic development incentive programs to strengthen their effectiveness and to protect our other budget priorities. More on these bills in the new year updates!

Operation Holiday Cheer

Each year the Bellevue Chamber of Commerce and Bellevue Economic Enhancement Foundation coordinate Operation Holiday Cheer, which provides hundreds of airmen at Offutt with bags of goodies for the holiday season. Operation Holiday Cheer is a way to show the Bellevue Community’s support for our locally stationed troops.

On December 5th dozens of people came together to stuff the bags and pack them up to be distributed. Thanks to all those who volunteered their time or resources to help make Operation Holiday Cheer successful for another year.

Independent Cattlemen Event in Valentine

On December 16th several other Senators and I flew up to Valentine to attend the Independent Cattlemen of Nebraska (ICON) annual gathering. We discussed property tax challenges facing Cattlemen and other issues that we will be discussing in the next session.


Panelists L-R: Senator Anna Wishart, me, Senator Bob Krist, Senator John Lowe, and Senator Mike McDonnell

Holiday Office Closure

The Legislature will be closed this Monday January 1st. We will return on January 2nd, ready to begin the 2018 session! I wish you all a very happy New Year’s.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislature Resumes January 3rd

The 2nd session of the 105th Legislature will begin on January 3rd. As in all even-numbered years, the upcoming session will be sixty days long (you can see the tentative 2018 calendar here). The start of session also means that I will transition back to sending out my email updates on a weekly basis rather than monthly, so that you can receive the latest news about what is happening in committee hearings and on the legislative floor.

Economic Development Taskforce

The Economic Development Taskforce met on November 3rd to hold our final public hearing for 2017. The meeting began with a panel discussion on Tax Increment Financing (TIF), focusing on the opportunities and challenges of using that tool. A panel discussion with City of Lincoln Director of Urban Development Dave Landis, Open Sky Policy Institute Director Renee Fry, and Plattsmouth City Administrator Erv Portis addressed a number of issues including transparency and evaluating return on investment. After the panel, Department of Economic Development Director Courtney Dentlinger and Department of Labor Commissioner John Albin joined us for a broader review of the topics covered by the Taskforce this summer and fall.

The Taskforce is required by statute to produce a report outlining economic development priorities by the end of this year. In December, Taskforce members will meet to discuss the report draft. Once it has been approved, the report will be available here under “Select/Special Committees.”

Federal Child Welfare Report

This year, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services completed a multi-phased review of the child and family services provided by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. Similar reviews were conducted in 2002 and 2008. These reviews allow the state to identify areas of improvement and growth, specifically in the areas of safety and performance. A final report on this review was just released, and my office will be going through the report thoroughly to understand our state’s performance and what actions the Legislature may need to take to support the Department as they work to fulfill the recommendations made. The final report can be found here.

Legislative Council Meeting

On November 16th and 17th the full Legislature met at UNL’s East Campus to talk about the upcoming session and some of the issues that we will likely address in 2018. The Legislative Council provides a forum for us to discuss issues that we will be addressing in the next session without the focus on debating a particular bill or amendment.  We had briefings on the budget shortfall, the justice oversight committee (their report will be out in December), the economic development task force, the legislative performance audit analysis of our Advantage Act tax incentives, water issues, and demographic trends that we need to consider as we plan for our future.  

2018 Bill Meetings

With the 2018 session nearly here, my office spent much of November meeting with stakeholders to discuss bills in the draft process. Before a bill is introduced, I try to meet with key groups that will be impacted by the bill or who have a part to play in carrying out the bill to get their suggestions and feedback.  This week I met with the Human Resources Association of the Midlands to discuss the potential administrative implications of one of the bills that I am planning to introduce. This feedback allows me to make changes to the legislation before it is introduced so that it functions more effectively on the ground if it is passed.

Sarpy Chamber Award

This year I was honored to be named the Sarpy County Chamber of Commerce’s Elected Official of the Year. It was a pleasure to join the Sarpy Chamber at their annual awards dinner on November 14th, and to celebrate the business and community leaders who do so much work to make Sarpy County a wonderful place to live and work. Congratulations to all the other awardees, and thanks to the Sarpy Chamber for their work!


Fellow Sarpy Chamber honorees and Chamber staff: (back row) Tim Conrad, Maury Salz, Jim Masters, Mark Vanderheiden, Karen Gibler, (front row) Travis Castle, Shelby Rust, me, Joanne Carlberg, and Gina Vanderheiden

MHEC Annual Commission Meeting

November 12th-14th I travelled to Kansas City for the Midwestern Higher Education Compact’s Annual Commission Meeting. MHEC is a collaborative interstate compact dedicated to promoting higher educational opportunities in the Midwest. The annual meeting brings together representatives from all 12 member states to discuss what their educational strategies and some of the challenges they face. Gathering everyone together allows state representatives to share ideas and information to help advance educational excellence across MHEC members.

Bellevue Veterans Parade 

Nebraska’s Official Veterans Parade was held on November 11th, and as usual it was a wonderful event. It was wonderful to walk with our 2017 Grand Marshall, Corporal Robert D Holts, and honor all the other veterans in our community.

Holiday Office Closures

The Legislature will be closed on December 25th (Christmas Day) and January 1st (New Year’s Day). Warmest wishes to you all!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Economic Development Taskforce

The Economic Development Taskforce met at the Capitol on October 13th for our monthly public meeting. For October the Taskforce focused on discussing economic development reports from both inside and outside the Legislature. First we had a panel from the Department of Economic Development, who shared the findings of a report on Nebraska’s innovation and entrepreneurship climate. Dan Curran, Dave Dearmont, and Joe Fox presented the report, which concluded that Nebraska’s innovation climate has improved in the last decade, but still has plenty of room to develop. The report specifically noted that limited risk capital, narrow market access for entrepreneurial products, and a small pool of experienced entrepreneurs are all challenges we face in Nebraska. Still, the report did suggest that Nebraska’s innovation climate is maturing, and that is a positive step. You can read the full report here.

Next was Dr. Eric Thompson, who is Director of the UNL Bureau of Business Research. He developed a review system of the Nebraska Business Innovation Act (NBI) to determine how successful NBI has been in achieving its goal: to attract and retain innovative businesses to the state. He analyzed NBI’s five primary programs and determined that for every $1 of direct state spending on the program, $6.72 of capital was raised; that same dollar also resulted in $7.21 in revenue. He also estimates that 967 jobs have been created as a result of NBI programs. His study found that NBI’s programs do have a measurable positive impact, and that Nebraska businesses have been successful in leveraging state support into economic growth. You can download Dr. Thompson’s full report here.

Finally we heard from Trevor Fitzgerald, our excellent Legal Counsel for the Urban Affairs Committee. He discussed the economic development tools available to municipalities, which were studied in detail in 2015 via LR155. While the state has a number economic development programs available (some of which are mentioned above), municipalities have fewer tools at their disposal. Trevor discussed the programs most often used by municipalities. You can read the full LR155 report here.

Judiciary Committee & Corrections Oversight Hearings

On October 20th the Judiciary Committee and Nebraska Justice System Special Oversight Committee held hearings about the Department of Corrections, and particularly about efforts being made to recruit and retain corrections staff. In the morning, the Judiciary Committee heard from current and former corrections staff who detailed some of the challenges they face. The most commonly cited issues are low wages, mandatory overtime, and a perceived lack of support for staff. It is always helpful to hear from those on the front lines of this issue, and I know the Judiciary Committee will take their testimony to heart as they proceed with their task.

In the afternoon the Oversight Committee talked to Corrections Director Scott Frakes and other corrections administrators about some of the concerns raised in the morning session, as well as other issues that have been raised in the last few months on staff and inmate safety, prison operations, and staff recruitment and retention. The committee also heard from Nebraska Ombudsman Marshall Lux, who stressed the importance of continued legislative oversight. For a full account of the day’s hearings, you can read the Journal Star’s coverage here.

The Judiciary Committee and Oversight Committee will continue their important work through the fall. I will follow their progress closely, and look forward to engaging with the results of their efforts throughout the upcoming legislative session.

Health & Human Services Interim Studies

The Health and Human Services Committee also met on October 20th, and held an all-day public hearing about occupational licensing reform. We heard from professionals, students, and trainers working in electrology, body art, esthetics, nail technology, barbering, cosmetology, and massage therapy. Last session the Health and Human Services Committee considered LB343, which proposed lowering the number of training and education hours currently required by the state to obtain licensure in specific professions. During discussions of LB343, some professionals raised concerns that lowering the hours requirement could lead to safety issues; others believe that safety would not be at risk, and that lowering the requirement would be economically beneficial to the state and new professionals in those fields.

The Committee therefore chose to study the issue further over the summer and fall, leading to the series of interim study resolutions we took up on October 20th (the full list of resolutions can be found here). Interim resolutions are not voted up or down; they are simply an avenue of study and inquiry, and a chance to engage the public. However, I expect that these studies will inform our discussions on the issue in the 2018 legislative session, and I appreciate all of those who took the time to share their experiences with the Committee.

State Fiscal Forecast

As you may have seen in the Omaha World Herald or other news sources, the state’s Economic Forecasting Advisory Board met last week and lowered tax revenue projections for the current and next fiscal year. The new projections leave the state with an approximately $195 million shortfall. The upcoming session will present many challenges, and this forecast only makes things tougher. Though we will not know the full extent of any shortfall until the Forecasting Advisory Board meets again in February, I will work for efforts to close any deficit in a responsible and thoughtful manner that does not unduly harm the state’s most vulnerable residents.

Sarpy Sewer Agreement Signed

In the 2017 legislative session I sponsored LB253, which authorized the creation of interlocal agreements to fund sewer improvements. For Sarpy County, which has had challenges developing south of the ridgeline because of the expense of creating a new sewer system, LB253 provides a path forward for development in the south of the county. On October 17th the Sarpy County Board and mayors of Papillion, La Vista, Gretna, Springfield, and Bellevue held a signing ceremony for this interlocal agreement, and I was pleased to be present. The agreement should spur development in Sarpy County, which will be a boon to Sarpy County’s economy. I am glad to have helped make this agreement possible.


L-R: Papillion Mayor David Black, Springfield Mayor Bob Roseland, Bellevue Mayor Rita Sanders, Senator Carol Blood, me, La Vista City Councilman Kelly Sell, Sarpy County Commissioner Brian Zuger, and Gretna City Administrator Jeff Kooistra

Bellevue Chamber Briefing

The Greater Bellevue Chamber of Commerce and Nebraska Chamber of Commerce hosted their annual Legislative Forum on October 17th. The forum is an opportunity for Sarpy County senators to share their priorities and thoughts about the upcoming session with business leaders, local officials, and members of the public. Many thanks to the Bellevue and Nebraska Chambers for hosting each year.


Speaking to attendees at the 2017 Legislative Forum

Running and Winning Workshop

Each year the League of Women Voters holds a workshop for young women in middle and high school who are interested in future public service. This year, approximately 55 young women from across the metro area came together at UNO to learn about what it takes to get elected, how they can serve, and some of the unique opportunities and challenges that elected women experience. We had the chance to meet with the participants in small groups to answer their questions, give advice, and share our experiences. Like always, this year’s participants were bright, thoughtful young people who want to make a difference in their communities. I look forward to watching them mature into our elected leaders of the future.

Fairview Elementary Visit

The 4th graders of Fairview Elementary had beautiful weather for their visit to Lincoln on October 19th. Though I was working in Bellevue that day, my staff was there to welcome the students to their state Capitol. I hope all the kids had a wonderful and educational visit!

ACA Open Enrollment Begins

The open enrollment period for coverage under the Affordable Care Act runs November 1st to December 15th this year. You can find more information at healthcare.gov. To get enrollment assistance in the Bellevue area (or anywhere else in the state), check out Enroll Nebraska’s help page here.

Veterans Day Parade

This is the 18th year that Nebraska’s Official Veterans Day Parade will take place in Bellevue, and this year it will be held on November 11th. The parade begins at 10:00 am, and runs from the corner of Jackson Street on Mission Avenue to Washington Park on Franklin Street. This year’s Grand Marshall is Corporal Robert D Holts, an Omaha native and current Bellevue resident who served honorably with the Tuskegee Airmen from 1942-1946. I encourage you to bring the whole family to this wonderful event, and to join me in support of our community’s many veterans.

Office Closure

My office will be closed on November 10th in observance of Veterans Day, and on November 23rd-24th for Thanksgiving. I send my warmest wishes to all of you this fall.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Arts and Economic Development

Over the lunch hour on September 15, I co-hosted a lunch with Nebraskans for the Arts to allow Nebraska senators and staff to learn more about Colorado’s creative districts from Margaret Hunt, Executive Director of Colorado Creative Industries. These districts bring together artists and other creative entrepreneurs to foster community growth and economic development. I’d like to thank Doug Zbylut, Executive Director of Nebraskans for the Arts, for helping us bring this lunch together.


Doug Zbylut and I speaking at the arts lunch 

Economic Development Taskforce

In the afternoon the Economic Development Taskforce held its monthly briefing. For September we focused on business incentives and job growth from several angles. We heard first from the Department of Economic Development about the department’s process for recruiting new businesses to Nebraska. This was followed by a panel of business owners from across the state, who talked about their experiences starting and expanding businesses in the state. They talked about how incentives fit into their choices to expand. Jeff Chapman, Project Director at the Pew Charitable Trusts, presented an overview of his organization’s research on improving the effectiveness of tax incentives. Finally we invited Martha Carter, head of the Legislative Performance Audit office, to discuss results of work done to evaluate the Nebraska Advantage Act and to propose improvements. We had a full agenda for the afternoon, but it was a good opportunity to understand our state’s business incentives in a more more in-depth way.

Urban Affairs Committee in Grand Island

Continuing our meetings around the state this fall, the Urban Affairs Committee met in Grand Island on September 29th for interim study public hearings. The first study discussed was my LR138. LR138 seeks to study the challenges municipalities across the state are facing as they try to deal with vacant and abandoned buildings, and search for a way to remedy the lack of resources available to municipalities to address these problematic properties. We heard from a number of interested parties in Grand Island, whose testimony will be extremely helpful as senators tackle this issue.

The second part of the hearing was a continuation of last month’s discussion on LR60, sponsored by the full Urban Affairs Committee. LR60 was introduced to give us an opportunity to more thoroughly examine a 2016 report on Tax Increment Financing (TIF) produced by the State Auditor’s office. Last month the same study had a hearing in North Platte to hear from municipalities and interested parties from the western part of the state. Next month the same study will have a hearing in Lincoln.  

The Urban Affairs Committee will hold one more interim hearing this fall. On October 6th the Committee will meet at the Capitol to continue hearing about LR60, and to hear testimony on Senator Justin Wayne’s LR81 on fire codes. To find more details about these or any other interim hearings scheduled by legislative committees, you can access the Legislature’s official calendar here. Hearings will be added throughout the fall as they’re finalized by each of the committees, so check back often if you’re interested in specific topics

Heritage Health Oversight Hearing

The Health and Human Services Committee convened its second quarterly Heritage Health Oversight Hearing on September 22nd. In the morning we heard from DHHS and the Managed Care Organizations about some of the improvements they have made to their processes, and their plans for continued improvement. We also heard from providers in the afternoon, however, who reported significant problems that still exist in some areas. These oversight meetings are important to hear about both the advances and issues we still see in the system. I appreciate the concrete steps taken by DHHS and the MCOs to improve performance, but am still concerned about the obstacles and administrative roadblocks reported by many providers. If you are experiencing problems with Heritage Health, please be sure to report those problems to DHHS.HeritageHealth@nebraska.gov. This email is designed to be a tracking system for problems as well as a means to get help. If you are not getting responses to or resolution for your concerns, please let me know.

Nebraska Public Health Association

The Public Health Association of Nebraska held its annual conference in Lincoln on September 21st. I joined them as part of a three-senator panel discussing public health and strategies for working effectively with senators on issues.


L-R: Greg Adams, PHAN Secretary Pat Lopez, Senator Kolterman, & Senator Stinner

Former Speaker Greg Adams moderated, while Senator Mark Kolterman, Senator John Stinner, and I talked about how public health workers can be the most effective advocates for themselves and their patients. We also talked about some of the challenges facing health professionals in Nebraska, and how the Legislature can play a role in promoting and investing in public health.

Nebraska 150 Celebration

The state has been celebrating its 150th birthday for all of 2017, and September 22nd was the official community celebration at the Capitol. The whole day was filled with events, starting with the dedication of the newly completed fountains in the Capitol courtyards.


With Jamesena Moore at the fountain dedication ceremony

Outside on the Centennial Mall, built in 1967 to celebrate Nebraska’s 100th birthday and recently refurbished, was a giant party for the whole state. We were first treated to a performance from the 43rd Army Band, made up of men and women from our own Nebraska National Guard. Next came musical performances from several Nebraska artists, closing out with a laser light show and fireworks.


The 43rd Army Band plays in front of the Capitol

As we celebrate 150 years of statehood, we should also remember the many sacrifices made by so many to build our state. The Good Life over the years has relied on the work of countless individuals and communities working together and sacrificing to make a better future.  

Soldier for Life Meeting

I met with Lieutenant Colonel Chris Pase and Lieutenant Colonel Jon Sowards from Soldier for Life on September 22nd to discuss opportunities to improve the transition of military members to communities and careers.


Meeting with Lt. Col Sowards (L) and Lt. Col Pase (R)

They were in town for trainings to help nonprofits who provide community services better understand how to work with veterans and their families. We also discussed ideas to recruit and help veterans transition into medical careers in the state. I appreciated the insights provided by Lt. Col. Pase and Lt. Col. Soward, and look forward to continued work on those issues going forward.

Rosie Revere Engineering Program

On September 23rd the Bellevue Public Library hosted an annual program to encourage girls to consider careers in engineering.


Working with some of the girls in the program

Based around the book “Rosie Revere, Engineer” by Angela Beaty, the event lets girls explore engineering in a fun and interactive way. This year’s event was sponsored by Senator Carol Blood, E&A Consultants, and Leo A Daley. It was a lot of fun spending time with so many smart young women!


Senator Blood leading the full group

Offutt Advisory Council

The Offutt Advisory Council (OAC) met on September 13th to discuss this year’s programs and plan for upcoming events. OAC is made up of community and business leaders in Sarpy County whose goals are to promote the base outside Nebraska and make life as welcoming as possible for Offutt servicemembers and their families.


Meeting with the OAC Board

OAC hosts events like the annual Offutt Appreciation Day Picnic, which provides a free day of food and fun to Offutt families to thank them for their service, and the Holiday Wishes drive to send care packages to troops overseas. OAC has worked closely with the leadership at Offutt for 25 years to support the base, and I am proud to be a part of those continuing efforts.

Grand Marshal Nominations

Nebraska’s Official Veterans Parade will take place this year on November 11th in Bellevue. Parade organizers are currently accepting nominations for the 2017 Grand Marshal, and you are invited to submit your suggestions. Nominations are due by October 13th.  

In order to nominate someone, you should provide a detailed bio on service to country and your reasons that you feel your nominee deserves the acknowledgement. Your nominee must be able to be at the dignitary breakfast beginning at 7:30 a.m. on November 11th, be available to ride in the parade from approximately 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon, present a small speech at the breakfast on their experience, and be willing to be interviewed by media.

You can send your nomination information to Doris Urwin at the Greater Bellevue Area Chamber of Commerce. You can email Doris at doris@bellevuenebraska.com or mail your nomination materials to 1102 Galvin Road South, Bellevue NE 68005. They request that you include both your contact information and the contact information for your nominee. Once a selection is made, the winner will be contacted. If you have any questions, you can also reach Doris at 402-504-9774.

Columbus Day

Please note that the Legislature and other state offices will be closed on Monday October 9th in observance of Columbus Day. If you need anything that day, please send me an email or leave a voicemail with my office. My staff will be back in the office Tuesday morning.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislative Update: August 2017

September 4th, 2017

Economic Development Taskforce

This month the Economic Development Taskforce met to discuss the ways in which the arts and humanities contribute to a strong economy and good quality of life in Nebraska. Representatives from Nebraskans for the Arts, the Lincoln Arts Council, Beatrice Community Players, the Northeast Downtown Omaha Arts & Trades District, and the Willa Cather Foundation were able to share unique insights about their organizations’ impacts and their ideas for fostering more creative and historic development. One of the resources provided at the hearing was an overview of policies in place in different states to encourage this kind of development, which you can access here.


The Economic Development Taskforce meeting at the Capitol

Our office is also hosting a lunch in September at the Capitol to learn more about how Creative Districts have worked in our neighboring state of Colorado.

Urban Affairs Committee in North Platte

On August 24th the Urban Affairs Committee traveled to North Platte to hold a public hearing on two interim studies: LR160 and LR60.

The purpose of LR160, introduced by Senator Dan Hughes, was to consider what tools Nebraska municipalities have to offer relocation incentives to prospective new residents. Particularly in more rural areas, skilled workers are in high demand to fill jobs in healthcare, construction, and other fields. For better or worse, our state constitution restricts simple relocation incentives in the form of loan repayment or tax forgiveness that some other states use. On the one hand, this makes it more difficult for our communities to compete with other states; but on the other hand, it also puts up strong protections on use of public money.

LR60, sponsored by the full Urban Affairs Committee, was introduced to give us an opportunity to more thoroughly examine a 2016 report on TIF produced by the State Auditor’s office. In North Platte we heard from some of the municipalities whose TIF projects were cited in the Auditor’s report. In most of these testimonies, municipalities explained how they had changed processes to address the concerns that were raised in the report. Most of these concerns were identified by the auditor as actions allowable under the law, but which raised questions about whether the law should be tightened to restrict these actions in the future. LB95, which I introduced last session, included many provisions to tighten these parts of the TIF statutes.

The Urban Affairs Committee has two more interim hearings scheduled for this fall. The first, in Grand Island on September 29th, will consider my LR138 on municipal condemnation and demolition as well as LR60. The second hearing, to be held in Lincoln on October 6th, will cover LR60 and Senator Justin Wayne’s LR81 on fire codes. To find more details about these or any other interim hearings scheduled by legislative committees, you can access the Legislature’s official calendar here. Hearings will be added throughout the fall as they’re finalized, so check back if you’re interested in specific topics.

Interim Issue Research

The Nebraska Legislature is structured so that senators may only introduce new bills in the first 10 days of each session, but my office often receives bill ideas throughout the year. In addition to the formal interim studies carried out by committees and senators, the fall months are an opportunity to look into those ideas that were brought to my office after bill introduction was over for 2017. In the month of August my office began researching some of those issues and scheduling meetings to learn more about them. Some (but not all!) of the topics we are investigating include protections for student journalists, military retirement taxes, the cost of insulin, staffing ratios in nursing homes, school lunch funding, cottage industry regulations, and many others. Though we will not introduce a bill on all issues, these ideas from constituents are always welcome. Oftentimes our early research suggests non-legislative solutions or improvements in the areas we examine. If you have an idea or concern, feel free to contact the office and share it with us.

Legislative Page Applications Open

Do you know anyone interested in serving as a page for the 2018 legislative session? Pages are college students who assist senators and the Clerk of the Legislature with various tasks, such as running errands for senators during the legislative session, assisting the Presiding Officer, and setting up and staffing committee hearings. The Page Program is open to high school graduates who are currently enrolled in a Nebraska college or trade school, and is an excellent opportunity to learn the basics of state government. It is a paid part-time position, and many students receive college internship credit.

The deadline for applications is Friday September 29th. Those interested in applying should first contact the Clerk of the Legislature’s office at (402) 471-2271 or email Kitty Kearns at kkearns@leg.ne.gov for an application. All applicants are also asked to provide a letter of recommendation from their state senator. If you live in LD45, I would be happy to hear from you!

Arrows to Aerospace Parade

The Arrows to Aerospace Parade on August 19th was, as always, a great success! This year the parade was designated one of the official events celebrating Nebraska’s 150th anniversary. That meant there was an even wider array of presentations, activities, and attendees than usual. I enjoyed marching in the parade and meeting with Bellevue residents in the park afterwards. I had a table in the park in the afternoon and had several folks stop by to talk.

Many thanks to the Bellevue-Offutt Kiwanis and other volunteers who work so hard to make the parade and community event such a success year after year!

Kiwanis Club of Bellevue

Senator Carol Blood and I spoke to the Kiwanis Club of Bellevue on August 17th. It is always a pleasure to join community-minded groups like Kiwanis. Our August gathering provided an opportunity to discuss previous and upcoming legislative sessions alike, as well as answer questions and talk about the priorities and concerns of those in attendance. As usual, it was an engaging and enjoyable time.

Backpacks for Offutt Students

My friend and colleague Senator Carol Blood organized an event on August 17th to distribute backpacks full of school supplies to military families in Bellevue who needed a little extra help at the start of the school year. It was an absolute honor to support this event, along with the many other donors and volunteers who made it happen.


Senator Blood with the group of volunteers who helped distribute backpacks to families. Photo courtesy Senator Blood.

This kind of support for our military families is a big part of what makes Bellevue such a strong community.

Eclipse Day at the Capitol

I hope you all had an opportunity to enjoy at least part of the eclipse that traveled across Nebraska on August 21st! My staffers Christina and Shayna were able to join other legislative staff right out on the Capitol lawns, along with lots of other Lincoln residents and visitors.


Christina and Shayna getting ready for the eclipse

 

The eclipse was a great showcase of Nebraskans’ hospitality and welcoming attitudes, and a very cool experience.

Upcoming Community Events

Join us on September 11th at 6:00 pm in the American Heroes Park for a moving ceremony to recognize those from Nebraska and Western Iowa who have lost their lives protecting our country since September 11th, 2001. The ceremony includes a moving tribute by the Bellevue West and Bellevue East ROTC students to honor each of these individuals by name. The ceremony also includes the joyful event of swearing in new citizens to our country. In the event of inclement weather, the BPS Lied Activities Center is the alternate location.

The Food Bank for the Heartland and BPS are continuing their partnership to offer mobile food bank access to Bellevue residents. They will visit Mission Middle School on September 20th from 5:00-6:30 pm this month, and will also be there the third Wednesday of subsequent months. 12 to 18 year-olds can also access the mobile clothes closet during food bank distribution times. For more information on the mobile food bank, and to check for any changes to the distribution schedule, you can find their website here.

Offutt and the Human Resource Association of the Midlands are hosting a job fair at the Bellevue Lied Activity Center from 10:00-1:00 on Thursday September 28th. It is open to the public, and especially encourages active duty service members, DoD civilians, veterans, retirees, guard and reserve soldiers, and their family members to attend. For more information, and to see a list of those companies planning to participate, check out their website here.

The Bellevue Farmer’s market will have two more dates this summer – September 9th and 16th from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm. Head to Washington Park for local food and crafts, family activities, and live entertainment. More information about our farmer’s market can be found here.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Second Economic Development Taskforce Meeting

On July 14th the Nebraska Economic Development Taskforce met to discuss education and economic development issues. The Taskforce brings together chairs of several of our standing committees (Appropriations; Revenue; Banking, Commerce & Insurance; Business & Labor and Education) and one senator from each of our three congressional districts across the state to foster proactive discussion of economic development priorities for our state that likely cross our typical committee boundaries. Our first task has been to learn more about what is already happening in our core agencies and our successful Nebraska communities.

At our July meeting, which focused on education, we first heard from the Nebraska Department of Education (NDE) and our state’s Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (CCPE). Rich Katt, the Director of Career Education at NDE, shared some of the ways in which Nebraska’s career education field has transformed in recent years. Many of those changes have happened through partnerships with schools across the state to develop priorities and plans for career education that best fits each school district. Two examples of NDE’s work in this area stood out: career readiness standards for schools and a new career curriculum developed by NDE. To learn more about NDE work on career education, you can visit their website here. While NDE works with K-12 education, CCPE provides state oversight for planning and coordination of higher education programs and facilities across our various types of institutions of higher learning. One of the innovative economic development programs they implement is a “gap” program that provides financial assistance to students who take community college courses that lead to careers, but who do not qualify for Pell Grant assistance because it does not lead to a degree (https://ccpe.nebraska.gov/gap). Dr. Michael Baumgartner, the CCPE’s Executive Director, also reported on innovations in other states that leverage Pell Grants with state incentives so that students have improved access to education and encouragement to stay in the state after graduation.

During the second half of our meeting we heard from leaders in education and innovation from across the state. Dr. Tawana Grover, Superintendent of Grand Island Public Schools, talked about Grand Island’s successful high school career academy that brings machines and computers from area workforces into the classroom and connects students to employment. Steve Elliott, the Vice President of Academic Affairs at Wayne State College, described how Wayne State collaborates with area businesses and works to recruit and retain Nebraska teachers for our career courses. Wayne State has one of the few programs in the region that specifically trains teachers for vocational education. Chuck Schroeder, the Founding Executive Director of the Rural Futures Institute at UNL, talked about their work in communities across the state to connect students to community leaders in order to tackle economic development challenges and build community capacity. Dr. Tom Pensabene, Executive Director of the Workforce Innovation Division at Metropolitan Community College, reported on Metro’s developments to expand information technology career readiness. And Dr. James Linder, UNL’s Chief Strategist former Senior Associate to the University President for Innovation and Economic Competitiveness, discussed ideas from current entrepreneurs in Nebraska on how we could encourage more innovation and entrepreneurship.

We meet next on August 11th. At that meeting we will hear about successful efforts across the state to foster economic development through cultural and arts programs.

July Travel

This was another busy month for me travel-wise. I had several great opportunities to work with colleagues and experts from around the country to learn about a range of issues.

In the second week of July I headed across the Missouri River to the Council of State Governments (CSG) Midwest meeting in Des Moines, Iowa. I serve as vice-chair of the Health and Human Services policy committee for CSG Midwest. We organized sessions on various topics, including the future of the ACA for our states and ways states might tackle health problems from opioid and lead. The session on opioids provided opportunities to hear from many different states about the work to combat opioid overdoses in their communities. Nebraska’s prescription drug monitoring program compares well to what other states are doing, and our rates of death from opioid overdoses remains lower than in other states around us. The discussion on addressing lead poisoning featured Kara Eastman from Omaha Health Kids Alliance. She discussed the work of Omaha Healthy Kids Alliance (http://omahahealthykids.org/) and the challenges to be addressed in all of our states related to lead in paint and drinking water.

* * *

At the end of July I set out for Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania to participate in the 12th Annual Commandant’s National Security Program (CNSP) at the U.S. Army War College. The CNSP brings civilian leaders to the Army War College for four days of lectures and seminars with the Army War College students who are earning their Master’s in Strategic Studies Degree. The program serves as a capstone experience right before their graduation.

Col. Shane Martin, Construction and Facilities Management Officer at the Nebraska Army National Guard, and now a graduate of this program, nominated me to participate. It was a good opportunity to meet with civilian leaders from all kinds of backgrounds to discuss strategic leadership in the military and beyond. It also provided an opportunity to continue to learn about ways Nebraska can support our active duty military and guard families.

Each of the civilians met with one of the smaller seminar groups for sessions throughout the week. I had a wonderful seminar group with a great Army War College faculty member. 

Bellevue-Offutt Kiwanis

One of the things I like to do during the interim is meet with local groups to discuss how this year’s legislative session went, talk about my priorities for the next session, and answer questions from attendees. The first such meeting of this interim was with the Bellevue-Offutt Kiwanis Club on July 21st. We had a good discussion about what happened in the last session. I took copies of the Nebraska Information Office’s overview of the 2017 session, which reports on key bills passed and not passed for each committee in the Unicameral. You can read those reports here.

Visiting Japanese Delegation

A delegation of visitors from Japan spent time in Omaha on July 17th, and it was my honor to meet with them. The delegation was invited to visit the United States as part of the International Visitor Leadership program. The primary focus of their visit was to discuss the issues that arise in communities that host military bases, particularly the coordination and cooperation that makes those community-base relationships work in Nebraska.

Senator Carol Blood and Mayor David Black were also part of this conversation. It was a pleasure to meet these visitors, and to learn from their perspectives as well.

Cancer Action Network Breakfast

The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network hosted their annual Nebraska Cancer Research Breakfast on July 20th. My legislative colleague Senator Mark Koltermann received their Legislator of the Year award for his work on a palliative care bill, LB323, last session.


Senator Kolterman (left) and Nick Faustman, Government Relations Director for Nebraska’s Cancer Action Network

The CAN breakfast focused on research about the link between HPV and neck and throat cancers later in life. Part of our conversation was the added impetus that this connection provides for strong HPV immunization rates for our adolescents. Improving immunization rates effectively requires good medical records, which relates to my interim study on immunization record-keeping – LR147.

Events in the District

On Tuesday August 1st Bellevue will celebrate National Night Out at Everett Park. The event, which runs from 6:00-8:30 pm, is an opportunity for Bellevue residents to gather together and meet some of the law enforcement personnel who keep our community safe. This year’s event at Everett Park will include food and activities for the whole family. If you have any questions about this event, you can contact Roger Cox with the Bellevue Police Department at 402-682-6623.

Representative Jeff Fortenberry will hold a town hall in Bellevue at the BPS Welcome Center at 2600 Arboretum Drive. The town hall will start at 12:00 pm on Monday July 31st. Representative Fortenberry will hold several other town halls in the region during the first week of August; you can find the full list here.

The Sarpy County Fair begins next week, running August 2nd-6th at the County Fair Grounds in Springfield. There will be a wide variety of contests, exhibits, concerts and other fun things to do. For a full schedule of events, visit the County Fair’s website here.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My new office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford). In addition to keeping followers up to date on my work in the legislature, we also regularly post a “Today in the Legislature” feature that lists some of the issues before the Legislature that day.
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45
Room #1016
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-2615
Email: scrawford@leg.ne.gov
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