NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE

The official site of the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature

Julie Slama

Sen. Julie Slama

District 1

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at jslama@leg.ne.gov

Week of July 5
July 12th, 2021

This week’s column will highlight a few of my bills that passed into law in 2021.

First, LB 152 was signed into law on May 5 and loosened restrictions on fireworks. In our district, hundreds of people would flock to Missouri each year to purchase the larger fireworks that they wanted. This has led to Missouri making nearly eight times as much firework revenue annually as Nebraska. The passage of LB 152 will keep Nebraskans from being labeled criminals for possessing bottle rockets. Now, we are free to celebrate the Fourth of July how we want to, without fear or breaking the law! 

Second, I introduced LB 327 this year, which will require a semester of financial literacy for students to graduate high school. This bill was amended into Senator McKinney’s LB 452 and was approved by the governor on May 25. Both LB 327 and LB 452 addressed the financial issues that our young Nebraskans face. With this bill becoming law, students will now be able to access an introduction to critical financial literacy fundamentals and will start off their lives as independent adults on better footing. 

Two of my bills, LB 403 and LB 593, passed quickly through the Legislature with nearly unanimous support, but that does not mean that they are not important. LB 403 offers better protections for Nebraska citizens against Medicaid liens and LB 593 addressed issues that our state had in recognizing foreign-country money judgments. Both bills were introduced to fix some of the kinks in our current law and were signed by the governor on May 5 as part of LB 501, a package full of non-controversial bills.

Last but not least, my personal priority bill for this session was Senator Briese’s LB 139, which prohibits frivolous COVID-related lawsuits. This law provides general liability protections from COVID-19 lawsuits for a broad range of individuals and organizations. These include, but are not limited to, restaurants, medical centers, and churches. Across the country, we are seeing individuals sue small businesses for exposing them to the coronavirus.. LB 139 will prevent civil action as long as the business was acting in compliance with federal public health guidelines in place at the time of the alleged exposure. The governor signed this bill into law on May 25.

It was an honor to pass these bills while representing the greatest district in Nebraska. I look forward to seeing these bills benefit Nebraskans in the years to come.

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of June 21
July 7th, 2021

Financial literacy is one of the most important skills a child can learn. Two bills were introduced this session to ensure that every graduate of Nebraska’s schools has the skill set necessary to make responsible financial decisions. My bill, LB 327, added a one-semester personal finance class as a statewide graduation requirement. LB 327 was amended into Senator McKinney’s LB 452, which encourages age-appropriate financial literacy concepts to be taught at all levels of K-12 education. LB 452 passed near the end of session and was signed into law.

Passage of LB 327 and LB 452 are massive victories for personal finance education in Nebraska. Students graduating high school need to make one of the largest financial decisions of their life– whether to attend college or go into the workforce. According to the Federal Reserve, student loan debt in the United States is $1.7 trillion dollars. Now, students will be able to access an introduction to critical financial literacy fundamentals and will start off their lives as independent adults on better footing. 

The Nebraska State Treasurer’s Office also provides many helpful free financial literacy resources for students, teachers, and parents.

EVERFI’s is used by more than two million K-12 students and is available to Nebraska school districts and educators at no cost. The program uses game-based lessons to teach students life skills through fun, scenario-based learning and includes courses in Financial Literacy. You can reach this resource at: https://everfi.com/k-12/parent-remote-learning/.

The Nebraska NEST Financial Education Center provides a short, interactive learning experience that prepares Nebraskans with the right skills to manage their financial future. You can explore options on how to invest in your future, or you can review financial basics. This resource can be reached at https://nest.everfi-next.net/welcome/collegesavings-achieve.

With the passage of LB 452 and resources like EVERFI and NEST, we can be sure that our students are on the right path towards a successful financial future.

My tour of office hours and town halls will kick off at the start of July. I’ll be joining Governor Ricketts for a town hall in Nebraska City at the Lied Lodge at 3 p.m. on Thursday, July 1. This town hall will cover the Nebraska Department of Education’s controversial proposed sex education standards (which begin sex education at kindergarten) and how you can help stop them. I’ll also be hosting a town hall in Auburn at the Rural Impact Hub on Friday, July 2 at 5 p.m.. This town hall will wrap-up the 2021 legislative session and preview both the 2021 special redistricting session and 2022 legislative session. If you’d like to chat with me one-on-one about an issue, I’d encourage you to come to my office hours. This week, I’ll be holding office hours at Gospel Coffee in Brownville on July 2 from 3-4 p.m. I’ll be announcing more town hall stops and office hours across District 1 in the coming weeks and would encourage you to attend!

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of June 7
June 22nd, 2021

This past session, the Legislature passed LB 406 to create the Statewide Tourism and Recreational Water Access and Resource Sustainability Special Committee, better known as the “STAR WARS” Committee. LB 406 was introduced by Senator McDonnell, and the committee will study potential flood control projects and related economic development opportunities in Nebraska.

The STAR WARS Committee will conduct a study of different areas around the State of Nebraska to identify potential projects and opportunities to enhance the value of those areas through economic development, tourism and recreation, flood control, and water sustainability. These projects would use federal funds, which are coming into the state with certain requirements attached. While I’d like to see these funds returned to taxpayers directly through tax relief, these are usually conditions attached to federal funding which prevent that from happening.  Using these funds for one-time expenditures, such as for new or improved recreational opportunities, could grow tourism in our state and take some pressure off in-state taxpayers for generations to come.

Nebraska has many beautiful areas that are worth exploring and attract many visitors across the country. In our district alone, we have Indian Cave State Park, which provides beautiful views of the Missouri River and a great escape into nature. The findings of the STAR WARS Committee could lead to even more areas like this in District 1.

The STAR WARS Committee includes Sen. Brandt from Plymouth, Sen. Clements from Elmwood, Sen. Flood from Norfolk, Sen. Gragert from Creighton, Sen. Hughes from Venango, Sen. McCollister from Omaha, Sen. McDonnell from Omaha, Sen. Wishart from Lincoln, the Chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, and the Speaker of the Legislature. These senators represent Nebraskans all across the state, and they’re ready to get started brainstorming ideas for across the state. 

That is where you come in. Since the STAR WARS Committee is looking to explore new and improved recreation options, I need your thoughts. What do you think would be the best recreation project for our district? Would it be better to have a larger lake in our area, or better camping facilities in our current parks? More park development along the Missouri River? Our district has so much to offer when it comes to natural beauty, and it is important for the STAR WARS Committee to consider projects to grow tourism in our corner of the state. We don’t want to miss the boat on this once-in-a-generation opportunity!

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of May 24
June 22nd, 2021

The Legislature adjourned Sine Die (Latin for “without a future date specified”) last Thursday, May 27, and with it, the first regular session of the 107th Legislature came to a close. This week’s column will begin a multi-week review of the session’s highlights.

This year’s budget is easily the most impactful piece of legislation passed this session. The biennial budget is always a key part of our long sessions, and our Appropriations Committee and full Legislature were able to pass a fiscally-responsible budget that benefits the entire state, including our district. A large part of this budget puts a record $1.7 billion towards property tax relief in this biennium. The budget also increased and restructured funding to our Nebraska State Colleges, which will greatly benefit Peru State College. Last, but not least, the budget put $725 million dollars in Nebraska’s reserve fund for financial stability. The budget was signed by Governor Ricketts on April 26.

Besides the budget, many solid bills were passed by the Legislature in this session. The bills range from property tax reform, cutting taxes for our citizens, and funding broadband infrastructure across our state. 

High property taxes are the biggest hurdle to Nebraska’s long-term growth. Apart from giving more money to the Property Tax Credit Fund, the first session of the 107th Legislature worked to address our property tax system. LB 2, introduced by Senator Briese, will change the valuation of ag land for the purposes of school district taxes levied to pay school bonds. This bill will shift the cost of school bonds away from owners of farm and ranch land. Also, Senator Ben Hansen introduced a “truth in taxation” bill, LB 644, which will require certain political subdivisions to hold a joint public hearing before increasing their property tax requests. These political subdivisions will also have to notify affected taxpayers of any scheduled hearing. With the approval of LB 644 on May 24, political subdivisions will be required to provide additional transparency for property taxpayers across our state.

Also in the realm of taxes, two bills were signed into law that cut taxes for many Nebraskans. LB 387 was introduced by Senator Brewer and will exempt 100% of military retirement pay from taxes. This makes Nebraska an attractive living option to those that have served our country in the military. LB 387 was signed by the governor on May 25. Senator Lindstrom introduced LB 64, which will phase out Nebraska’s tax on Social Security income by 2030. LB 64 was passed toward the end of session.

The 107th Legislature also invested a record amount in expanding rural internet access through LB 388, which was signed into law on May 26. Under LB 388, the Public Service Commission will administer grants to fund qualifying broadband development projects in under-served areas. This bill appropriates $20 million annually beginning this upcoming fiscal year to the Public Service Commission for the grants. Improving broadband access and reliability in rural Nebraska is a critically important factor to growing our economy. 

It’s been the privilege of my lifetime to serve you, District 1, and I’m looking forward to continuing to work for you and our region as a whole. Please stay tuned as I schedule my traditional series of town hall discussions across District 1 to wrap-up the 2021 session and hear your priorities for 2022. During the interim, my columns will be sent out every other week, rather than weekly. 

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov

Week of May 17
June 22nd, 2021

As Memorial Day approaches, it’s imperative to reflect upon the sacrifices made by the brave men and women who have given their lives in service of our country. This week’s column is dedicated to a Nebraska hero: Medal of Honor Recipient, Army Combat Medic, and Lincoln Native, Charles Hagemeister, passed away on May 19, 2021 at the age of 74 in Leavenworth, Kansas.

Hagemeister was born in Lincoln on August 21, 1946, and grew up in our state. He attended Lincoln’s Southeast High School and was drafted into the United States Army in 1966 while on break from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Hagemeister was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on March 20, 1967. Medals of Honor are awarded for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty.” Hagemeister absolutely fulfilled this requirement, and his Medal of Honor citation best explains the events of that day. 

“While conducting combat operations against a hostile force, Sp5c. Hagemeister’s platoon suddenly came under heavy attack from three sides by an enemy force occupying well-concealed, fortified positions and supported by machine guns and mortars. Seeing two of his comrades seriously wounded in the initial action, Sp5c. Hagemeister, unhesitatingly and with total disregard for his safety, raced through the deadly hail of enemy fire to provide them medical aid… Attempting to evacuate the seriously wounded soldiers, Sp5c. Hagemeister was taken under fire at close range by an enemy sniper. Realizing that the lives of his fellow soldiers depended on his actions, Sp5c. Hagemeister seized a rifle from a fallen comrade, killed the sniper, three other enemy soldiers who were attempting to encircle his position, and silenced an enemy machine gun that covered the area with deadly fire. Unable to remove the wounded to a less exposed location and aware of the enemy efforts to isolate his unit, he dashed through the fusillade of fire to secure help from a nearby platoon. Returning with help, he placed men in positions to cover his advance as he moved to evacuate the wounded forward of his location. These efforts successfully completed, he then moved to the other flank and evacuated additional wounded men despite the fact that his every move drew fire from the enemy. Sp5c. Hagemeister’s repeated heroic and selfless actions at the risk of his life saved the lives of many of his comrades and inspired their actions in repelling the enemy assault. Sp5c. Hagemeister’s indomitable courage was in the highest traditions of the Armed Forces and reflect great credit upon himself.

President Lyndon B. Johnson presented Hagemeister with the Medal of Honor in the Pentagon on May 14, 1968, nearly a year after the events took place. Hagemeister continued to serve our nation until his retirement in 1990, after achieving the rank of lieutenant colonel. After his retirement, he served on the board of the Congressional Medal of Honor Society.

Fortunately, Charles Hagemeister survived the events of March 20, 1967, and the entirety of the Vietnam War. He got to go on and live a long, fulfilling life. Not only that, he risked his life to make sure his comrades got to live long, fulfilling lives as well. However, not all of our servicemen and women make it back home.

Many Americans see Memorial Day as a three-day weekend spent barbecuing, but we need to remember the importance of this holiday. It is a day to honor and extend gratitude to the men and women who died while serving our country. There are many ways that we can honor the lost, from local events hosted across District 1 to a simple moment of prayer. Each year on Memorial Day, a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3 p.m. local time. At this time, Americans, wherever they are, can take a minute of silence to remember those that paid the ultimate price to protect our nation. Wherever you may be this Memorial Day, please remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of May 10
June 22nd, 2021

This past week, we celebrated National Police Week, and on the 15th, we celebrated National Peace Officers Memorial Day. I want to take this time to celebrate the men and women in blue throughout the State of Nebraska, especially in District 1.

Law enforcement officials, whether they work for police departments or county sheriffs, do so much to keep those that they serve safe. They ensure public safety by responding to incidents involving domestic violence, substance use disorders, mental health challenges, and homelessness. These are all scary situations, and only are a glimpse of what law enforcement officials do for our communities.

Every morning, our men and women in blue pin on their badges and go off to work, not knowing how their day will go. However, for our officers, a bad day is not like a bad day in an office. There are real, dire circumstances that law enforcement officials deal with. To serve and protect our communities is a dangerous occupation, and the families of our officers have to worry about whether their loved ones will come home at the end of the day. In Nebraska, we’ve had 116 law enforcement officers lose their lives in the line of duty. Many of us remember the death of Investigator Mario Herrera last August. It is during National Police Week and National Peace Officers Memorial Day that we remember Investigator Herrera and all of the other officers that have sacrificed their lives for the protection and safety of our communities.

Especially in today’s America, our men and women in uniform are under attack, both physically and as an institution.  In 2020, felonious officer deaths jumped 28 percent from 2019. This is horrendous. We should be doing what we can to protect those that sacrifice so much to protect us. Simply put, the entire field of law enforcement is being vilified for the actions of a few bad officers. We can not and will not let that be the case in Nebraska. We ask so much from our law enforcement officials, and it is our solemn responsibility to ensure that our officers are respected and have the resources necessary to serve and protect.

This week is the perfect time to highlight the county sheriffs and police chiefs in our district. Not only do these outstanding men work diligently to keep our district safe, they are also active members of their community. They exude love for their cities, counties, and state, and we should be grateful for them and all those in our community who answer the call to serve.

  • Sheriff Colin Caudill- Otoe County Sheriff
  • Sheriff Brent Lottman- Nemaha County
  • Sheriff Branden Lang- Pawnee County
  • Sheriff Scott Walton- Johnson County
  • Sheriff Richard Hardesty Jr.- Richardson County
  • Chief Dave Lacy- Nebraska City Police Department
  • Fmr. Chief Duane Armbruster- Falls City Police Department
  • Chief Jameson Baker- Falls City Police Department

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of May 3
May 7th, 2021

This week, the Executive Board of the Legislature held a hearing on a resolution that I proudly co-sponsor, LR 107, introduced by Senator Groene that serves as a clear statement of our state Legislature’s grave concerns with the Biden administration’s actions against our First and Second Amendments, elections, property rights, and vaccine passports.

It is well-known that the Constitution of the United States says that Americans have the right to their own religion, and Nebraska’s State Constitution reflects the same values. Nebraskans have the explicit freedom to practice their religion according to the dictates of their consciences without interference from the government. However, we are seeing the federal government act in ways that seek to punish traditional religious beliefs about the sanctity of life and sexuality. LR 107 outlines the federal government’s infringement of Nebraskans’ rights to practice their religious beliefs as they see fit through attacks on pro-life movements to inappropriate sex education standards.

In early April, the Biden administration signed six Executive Orders to “reduce gun violence.” These measures include creating model “red flag” legislation for states. In reality, these Executive Orders will infringe Nebraskans’ right to bear arms, as granted in the Second Amendment. Luckily, 80 of our 93 counties have declared themselves Second Amendment Sanctuary Counties, and our Governor has declared Nebraska as a Second Amendment Sanctuary State. LR 107 states that Nebraska recognizes that the orders issued by the President of the United States are in opposition to the U.S. Constitution and the Constitution of Nebraska. 

LR 107 also states that our state is opposed to the federal government’s attempt to usurp the election process in our nation. The House of Representatives recently introduced H.R. 1, which would destroy protections on our elections such as voter identification requirements, periodic updates of voter files, and restrictions on fraud-prone ballot harvesting. This legislation would also take the right of redistricting from state legislatures. The Constitution states that election laws are left to state legislatures to decide, and LR 107 calls out the federal government for working to uproot that.

Senator Groene’s resolution also expresses Nebraska’s dissatisfaction with the federal government’s plan to restrict the private use of at least thirty percent of America’s lands and waters, coined the “30×30 Plan” by 2030. In our state, 97% of our land is privately owned. As a state, we can not, and will not allow the federal government to take property away from our citizens without due process. Doing so would be a direct violation of the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution.

Finally, LR 107 addresses vaccines and vaccine passports. Nebraskans have a right to choose what vaccines they want to be injected into their bodies, and the federal government should not have the ability to force citizens of the United States to get a vaccine. Similarly, vaccine passports and mandates violate the Constitution in that it restrains a person’s right to peaceably assemble and restricts their freedom to travel or conduct commerce.

LR 107 is a timely resolution that addresses many of the issues which concern Nebraskans. Our Bill of Rights was created to protect our rights citizens. It is our duty as a state to place a check on the federal government when it steps outside of its authority and tries to take away our rights. I look forward to discussing this resolution on the floor and representing the values that Nebraskans hold dear.

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of April 26
May 3rd, 2021

As we enter the final twenty days of the long session, it only seems fitting that our legislative days would extend into the twilight of each day, as well. This week was a productive one, packed with late-night debate, a few filibusters, and some fireworks- both literal and figurative.

This past Friday morning, my bill to expand the sale of fireworks, LB 152, passed on Final Reading with a vote of 42-3. LB 152 passed with an emergency clause, which means that it will go into effect as soon as the governor signs the bill into law. This Fourth of July, Nebraskans will be able to purchase a far wider variety of fireworks.

Our state’s definition of consumer fireworks departed from the federal definition, which created restrictions that limited the fireworks available to Nebraskans, especially when analyzing our neighboring states, such as Missouri and South Dakota. This had an economic impact on our state. In 2019, fireworks sales in Missouri topped 51 million dollars, while Nebraska only made 6.6 million. That statistic means Missouri has per-capita firework sales nearly three times that of Nebraska. A significant reason for this is that Nebraskans were willing to travel out of state to get access to fireworks that they could not purchase at home. Now that LB 152 has passed, Nebraskans can buy their larger fireworks in-state, rather than by crossing the border. LB 152 will boost our economy by encouraging in-state purchases of fireworks, while still ensuring that the State Fire Marshal’s office has the tools necessary to maximize safety.

In other positive news, Senator McKinney’s LB 452 passed through to the second round of debate this past week. LB 452 would require Nebraska’s graduating seniors complete at least one half-credit’s worth of coursework in personal finance.

Now more than ever, financial literacy is critically important to our youth. According to the Federal Reserve, student loan debt in the United States is $1.71 trillion dollars, which is almost double our country’s total credit card debt. We’ve never had this kind of level of personal debt in our country, we’re sending young adults into the world and out to college with little idea how to balance a budget and scarce understanding that the thousands of dollars that they’re taking out in student loans to pay for college are the only kind of debt that doesn’t disappear with bankruptcy. After the implementation of LB 452, we will be giving our youth a basic understanding of their personal finances and securing them better access to a successful future. 

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of April 19
April 26th, 2021

Late night floor debate has kicked off in our Nebraska Legislature, marking the busiest time of session. We passed the state’s biennial budget on Wednesday, which will make strides in several areas. The budget allocates nearly $1 billion to property tax relief, millions of dollars to grow infrastructure in our rural communities, and places $725 million into our state’s Cash Reserve Funds to maximize Nebraska’s financial stability. Finally, the budget gives the Legislature over 200 million dollars that we can invest in additional tax relief and modernizing our tax codes. Many tax relief bills have reached the floor of the Legislature and will be considered in the next two weeks.

First, LB 64 would make Nebraska more welcoming to retirees. Senator Lindstron’s LB 64 would phase out the income tax on social security income. Currently, we are one of only 13 states that collects state income taxes on Social Security payments. This makes us an unattractive option to those that are looking for a place to retire and should be a priority of the Legislature to change. On its face, taxing Social Security income is indefensible double taxation. LB 64 has passed through the Revenue Committee and is waiting for its full debate. 

LB 387, introduced by Senator Brewer, would make Nebraska an attractive living option to those that have served in the military by exempting military retirement pay from state income taxes. 31 states currently do not tax military retirement, and Nebraska should be the next one to join them. Fortunately, LB 387 has passed through two rounds of debate, and will soon get its final vote before being signed into law.

Property tax relief has been another large discussion in the Legislature, especially over the past week. Property taxes are still the top issue that faces our state, especially in our rural areas.  

Senator Briese introduced LB 2, which would change the valuation of ag land for school bonds. Currently, this land is valued at 75% of its actual value for the purposes of property taxes from school bonds. This bill would change the value used to retire school bonded indebtedness to 50% percent of its actual value. LB 2 would fairly distribute the cost of school bonds in districts where residential property owners outnumber farmers and ranchers, who pay a larger portion of the bond debt due to higher land valuations. These ag landowners, who may not live in the school district and lack the ability to vote on the bonds, are left paying a disproportionately high proportion of the bond total. LB 2 passed the first round of debate on a vote of 38 to 3.

High taxes hurt our economic development as a state and hinders our small communities and towns in their growth. I hope that, through these tax relief bills, we can make a substantial change for the better in Nebraska.

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Week of April 12
April 19th, 2021

I hope you are having a lovely spring so far, District 1. Temperatures are warming up and planting season is in full swing. This week’s column will discuss the current situation with the Second Amendment in both our nation and our state.

On April 7, in response to the mass shooting in Boulder, Colorado, the Biden-Harris Administration announced several anti-gun measures. These actions include proposing rules to limit the sale of “ghost guns” and the publication of model red flag legislation for states among other gun control measures. There should be no excuse for any illicit action that takes an innocent life, but these actions should be seen for what they are– a gross violation of our Second Amendment rights. 

Governor Ricketts has responded to this proposed infringement of the Second Amendment by making the State of Nebraska a Second Amendment sanctuary state. This means that, if the federal government creates laws that attack our right to bear arms, our state will not recognize or enforce them. This way, Nebraskans can practice their freedoms granted to them through the Second Amendment without fear of breaking the law. However, these orders will expire at the end of the Governor’s term.

To make a more permanent change, our state needs legislation that will continue to protect our right to bear arms. Several bills have been introduced this session to protect the Second Amendment for Nebraskans. This includes Senator Halloran’s LB 188 and my LB 300. LB 188 would adopt the Second Amendment Preservation Act, which, in simple terms, would put in statute what Governor Ricketts’s proclamation sets out to do. LB 300 would clarify the Castle Doctrine Statutes in our state. Currently, you can defend yourself in your home, and still be criminally charged by the courts. LB 300 would work to combat that and would give Nebraskans the opportunity to defend themselves in their homes, workplaces, or motor vehicles.

Both LB 188 and LB 300 had their public hearings are being held by split committees. For the full Legislature to debate these bills and pass them into law, they need to be voted on and advanced to the floor. LB 188 is being held by the Government, Military and Veterans Affairs Committee and LB 300 is being held in the Judiciary Committee. You can do your part to get these bills passed by reaching out to the members of the committees and sharing your support. The committee list and contact information for senators can be found at nebraskalegislature.gov.

In our country, we have the unique ability to reach out to our public officials and share our opinion. This makes private citizens some of the most important protectors of our rights. I encourage you to reach out to your representatives, both on the state and federal level, to share your thoughts on preserving the Second Amendment.

As always, I welcome your input on issues important to you. Follow along on my Facebook and Twitter pages, both entitled “Senator Julie Slama” for more updates, or contact me directly at Senator Julie Slama, District 1 State Capitol, PO Box 94604, Lincoln NE 68509-4604; telephone: 402-471-2733; email: jslama@leg.ne.gov.

Sen. Julie Slama

District 1
Room 11th Floor
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
(402) 471-2733
Email: jslama@leg.ne.gov
Search Senator Page:
Topics
Archives

You are currently browsing the District 01 blog archives for the year 2021.

Committee Assignments
    Banking, Commerce and Insurance
    Executive Board
    Judiciary
    Nebraska Retirement Systems
    Reference
Search Current Bills
Search Laws
Live Video Streaming
Find Your Senator