NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE

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Sen. Sue Crawford

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at scrawford@leg.ne.gov

Celebrating Paul Hartnett

On Wednesday February 13th we celebrated the retirement from public life of former Senator Paul Hartnett, who represented LD 45 for 20 years. He was joined by his daughters Joan Hartnett and Debbie Burchard, plus friends Judy Garlock and Tex Richters. During the morning session I read the text of LR 23, a resolution to congratulate and thank Paul for his life of public service. Then Paul, his family and friends, and some of the many legislative staffers who have worked with Paul over the years headed over to the Parkway Lanes Bowling Alley for lunch (and most importantly, a slice of their superb pie!).


L-R: Joan Hartnett, Tex Richters, Debbie Burchard, Judy Garlock, and Paul Hartnett, with legislative staffers Sally Schultz and Julia Holmquist

Paul has been a tireless advocate for Bellevue in his half-century of public service. We are all grateful for his advocacy and his friendship over the years, and I trust he will enjoy his retirement to the fullest.

Debate and Hearings This Week

This week, and for most weeks going forward, the Legislature was only in session for four days. The intent of our four-day-week-schedule is to allow senators (especially those who live out west) enough time to get home, catch up on work for their other jobs, spend some time with their families, and check in with constituents in the district over the weekend. Many western senators stay in Lincoln during the week rather than try to drive several hours back and forth. Since the Unicameral is a part-time legislature, meeting only four days makes it easier for senators to serve and gives staff a day to catch up without the unpredictability of session.

This week on the floor we talked about several important bills. LB 160, introduced by Senator Dan Quick, would expressly authorize municipalities to use Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act funds for early childhood development infrastructure. We know that limited childcare is one of the barriers to attracting qualified applicants to jobs in Nebraska and that high costs can be a serious burden on families who already live here. LB 160 will provide an important tool to encourage new childcare facilities.

Another bill that drew significant attention and discussion was Senator Tom Briese’s LB 183. The bill would change how ag land is valued when a school district or higher education institution issues bonds, with the purpose of limiting farmers’ and ranchers’ obligations under such bonds. Senator Briese brought this bill as part of the larger discussion around property tax rates – the state government does not collect property taxes but is under significant pressure to help lower them indirectly. Current law values ag land at 75% of its assessed value for bond purposes; Senator Breise’s bill as introduced lowered that to 1%, and the Revenue Committee’s amendment raised that to 30%. I did not support the bill in Committee and have serious concerns that such a low valuation on ag land would simply cause the burden to swing over to local homeowners and make it much more difficult for school districts and colleges to finance their work. After about two hours of debate LB 183 was placed on what’s known as a Speaker’s hold, which simply means it will not be rescheduled for debate until the Speaker feels that enough progress has been made to advance the bill.

Wednesday and Thursday in the Revenue Committee were very long nights, as we heard a series of bills over the two days that are all trying to update our tax system in different ways to reduce the property tax burden on ag producers. On Wednesday we discussed LB 182, which would allow school districts to adopt an optional income surcharge tax to reduce their dependence on property taxes for education purposes. Senator Bolz brought that bill and discussed in the hearing how it had helped to lower property taxes in parts of Iowa that had adopted it. On Thursday we took up LB 314, LB 497 and LB 677. These are three of the most systemic efforts to change revenue sources and reduce property tax rates. However, it is true that each of the various proposals we heard in Revenue Committee may have unintended consequences and increase the burdens on other people, which is an important part of the discussion. We heard from all kinds of testifiers about how the various proposed changes would affect them, both for good or for ill. Since I am new to the Revenue Committee this session I look forward to digging into all these tax bills and the broader implications they may have for individuals and businesses. We will have hearings on other bills this session that attempt to retool our tax code (including my LB 614, which is also a systemic approach to rebalance taxes and school financing). LB 614 does not yet have a hearing scheduled. These will be ongoing discussions and I do not expect the committee to take immediate action on any one bill.

Lincoln’s Birthday Ceremonies

The 210th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, born February 12, 1809, was Tuesday. On that day we began the session with a special Presentation of Colors ceremony by the Nebraska Department of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. The group also posted an honor guard that day at the statue of Lincoln on the capitol’s west side.

After the Civil War, the Grand Army of the Republic was formed as the first-ever fraternal organization for veterans. In 1881 the Grand Army of the Republic created the Sons of Union Veterans to carry on the memory and traditions of the G.A.R. after the last G.A.R. members were gone.

Today, the Sons of Union Veterans are recognized by Congress as a Veterans’ organization, charged with keeping alive the memory of those who served our country during the Civil War, 1861 to 1865. Their presence on Tuesday was an excellent reminder of our nation’s history and of President Lincoln’s work to keep the United States together.

Sarpy Leadership Day

Tuesday February 12th was also Leadership Sarpy Day at the Legislature. Each year the Sarpy County Chamber of Commerce sponsors an 11-month program to help Sarpy residents develop leadership skills that they can utilize in our community. As part of the program, the group spends a day at the Unicameral hearing from representatives of the various state government branches. This year the group heard from several legislative committee chairs and the Sarpy senator delegation and two Supreme Court judges. If you are interested in participating in next year’s Leadership Sarpy class, you can find more information here.

Papillion School Group

A group of students from Papillion Middle School, Liberty Middle School, and La Vista Middle School visited the capitol on Thursday as part of a program on government. Senator John Arch and I joined them briefly on their building tour to welcome them to the capitol and talk about our work as senators.

I know I saw several interested faces when I reminded them that any one of them – in a few years, of course – can serve in our legislature. They also spoke to Senator Carol Blood over lunch. I hope they enjoyed their time in Lincoln, and I trust they learned a lot.

OLLI Unicameral Class

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) is a program at UNL for adults 50 years or older to take weekly classes in everything from salsa dancing to diabetes health to basketball bracketology. On Thursday February 14th I spoke to enrollees in the class “One of a Kind: Nebraska’s Unique Legislature” about how I decided to run for office, the greatest achievements and challenges of my time in the Legislature, and some of the key issues the Unicameral is talking about this year. I always enjoy speaking to this group and this year was no different. If you want to learn more about OLLI, you can check out the program’s website and brochure here.

Opening Prayer

I served as the Legislature’s Chaplain of the Day on Valentine’s Day, so I chose to speak briefly on the power of love in our lives. I deeply value the support of all my family and other loved ones, and I wish the best to you and yours!

Presidents’ Day Office Closure

All state offices, including my own, will be closed on Monday February 18th in observance of Presidents’ Day. If you need assistance that day, please send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Floor Debate and Bills Advanced

This week the Legislature was highly productive in our morning debate sessions. We voted to advance a number of important bills. Some of those bills include:

My LB 306 was discussed and advanced in the middle of the week. LB 306 adds family caregiving responsibilities to the list of reasons that a person can leave a job “for good cause” so that they are eligible for unemployment. We added a provision that employees need to have spoken to their employers to try to make accommodations before they quit. We certainly encourage employers and employees to seek understanding and accomodation when a family member is sick, as retaining employment is often a vital financial lifeline for caregivers and good for business stability. But if that is not possible with the demands of the job or the care needed, that employee can get some assistance while they apply for a job that would accommodate their caregiving needs.

We also discussed and unanimously advanced Senator Justin Wayne’s LR 1CA, a proposed constitutional amendment that will remove a clause in our state constitution that still allows slavery as punishment for a crime. No such sentence has been handed down since the 1940s, and it is important that our constitution is updated to confirm that slavery in any situation is inhumane and against every value we hold dear. While sometimes our law books contain outdated and defunct references that are effectively ignored, such a glaring stain on our collective history deserves no place in our state’s core legal foundation. Once the Legislature approves LR 1CA it will appear on the next general election ballot in 2020 to be confirmed by the voters.

Senator Tom Brewer introduced LB 154 after working with Judi gaishkibos of the Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs, Senator Patty Pansing Brooks, and many others. The bill authorizes a comprehensive 2-year state study on missing Native American women and children, who go missing at a significantly higher rate than do other demographic groups. This study will provide key information about why these crimes occur at such a high rate and, crucially, what the state can do to support efforts by our own law enforcement, tribal governments, and nonprofits to stem the tide.

Another bill we discussed was LB 192. Introduced by Senator John McCollister, it allows National Guard and Reserve veterans to be recognized through our existing veteran designation on our driver’s licenses and state identification cards. This recognizes the service of those who have served in the National Guard and Reserves.  

Bill Hearings This Week

This was a busy week for my office. Of the 22 bills I introduced, we had public hearings for more than one quarter of them just this week! Those bills were:

On Monday February 4th the Business and Labor Committee heard two of my bills, both focused on employee well-being and productivity. LB 305 creates the “Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act” and requires employers with four or more employees to provide employees with one hour of “sick and safe” leave for every thirty hours worked. Safe leave can be used by employees experiencing domestic violence or stalking. The second bill, LB 311, creates the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act. PFMLA will provide time off with partial wage replacement for qualifying reasons for all workers covered by unemployment insurance: six weeks to care for a family member with a serious health condition or a military family member preparing for or returning from deployment, and twelve weeks to care for a new child or for one’s own health condition. Channel 3 News did a great story on LB 311, which you can find here.

We had a third hearing on Monday – LB 235 in the General Affairs Committee. This bill allows for those making home brewed alcohol to serve samples at festivals and fundraisers without a permit, as long as they are not selling the samples and the event is legally conducted under the Nebraska Liquor Control Act. Monday was definitely the busiest day in a hectic week.


(L-R) Bryan Dort, Matthew Misfeldt, and Gwyn Evans came to testify in favor of LB 235

On Tuesday February 5th the Urban Affairs Committee discussed LB 124, which clarifies that municipalities can jointly administer a clean energy assessment district under the Property Assessment Clean Energy Act, or PACE program. This is a “cleanup” bill for legislation that was passed several years back.

We had a break from hearings on Wednesday and Thursday, then went right back to it on Friday February 8th. Over the noon our the Executive Board heard LB 566 which requires the department of insurance to inform the legislature before they seek a waiver and then seek legislative approval prior to implementing a 1332 Waiver, or “state innovation” waiver. State innovation waivers allow states to manipulate the types of health plans that are available on the ACA marketplace, so this bill would provide important oversight and protection for Nebraskans.

Last, the Revenue Committee discussed LB 123. This bill fixes an issue for the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired. A current requirement in the Taxpayer Transparency Act requires them to publish information about their contracts with individuals receiving services online, which is in conflict with the Commission’s confidentiality policies. The Commission brought this bill to me and I was happy to introduce it for them.

Now my office has a bit of a break, as our next bill hearing is not scheduled until February 21st. Committee hearings will continue until the end of March, with the Legislature tentatively scheduled to begin all-day floor debate on April 2nd. As always, you can find the full list of committee hearings here.

Legislative Performance Audit Committee

This biennium I was appointed to the Legislative Performance Audit Committee and had the honor of being elected Vice Chair by the other members. The Performance Audit Committee is charged with giving oversight and policy guidance to the Legislative Performance Audit office, which is staffed with professional full-time auditing staff. Unlike the State Auditor’s office, which looks at agencies’ financial activities to ensure they’re following state and federal law, the Performance Audit office evaluates agencies and their programs to determine how well legislative intent is being implemented. Their job is in their name – to audit agencies’ performance and check whether, and how well, they’re doing what the Legislature has asked them to.

This week the Performance Audit Committee met to discuss our priorities for the biennium. The Performance Audit office has some state programs that it is statutorily required to audit on a revolving schedule, but otherwise has broad discretion to investigate programs at senators’ request. Sometimes that’s because an agency has been in the news for questionable practices, but just as often it’s simply because a senator is curious about a program’s inner workings or thinking about potential program changes.

President’s Day Office Closure

All state offices, including my own, will be closed on Monday February 18th in observance of President’s Day. If you need assistance that day, please send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Bill Debate Begins

This week marked the start of bill debate each morning. The Unicameral’s unique structure means that every introduced bill must have a public hearing, and that the public must have at least one week’s notice before the hearing is held. That means that the bills we’re debating on the floor now were mostly introduced in the first few days of session, then had quick hearings last week, and were non-controversial or simple enough that the committees acted on them expeditiously. My LB 121 and LB 305, discussed below, both fall into those categories. LB 121 passed on General File Friday morning after a short debate.

At the beginning of the biennium, bills are debated in what’s known as worksheet order. That means bills come up for debate in the same order that committees report them out to the floor, without needing any kind of priority designation from a senator. That quick turn-around is one reason that senators often try to get bills introduced in the first couple of days when the session starts. At this point in the session that worksheet doesn’t have very many bills on it – when General File debate of bills began Friday January 25th last week, we got through the whole worksheet (which held a whopping four bills at the time). This week, when we spent all four days debating bills in the morning, we took up a further 13 bills spread from Monday to Thursday this week and 14 more on Friday alone. That trickle of bills will soon turn into a flood as committee hearings continue and more bills are reported out. If you’re curious to see where bills are in the process, you can access each day’s worksheet by going to the Legislative Calendar (here), clicking on today’s date, and opening the worksheet link under “Legislative Activity.”

PFML and Military Retirement Bill Hearings

Two big bill hearings will take place next week on Monday February 4th and Thursday February 7th. The first, on Monday in the Business & Labor Committee, is my LB 311 to enact the Paid Family and Medical Leave state insurance program. This bill would extend access to paid family and medical leave to the vast majority of working Nebraskans through a small tax on employers – similar to the unemployment insurance system.

The Thursday hearing will be on LB 153 in the Government, Military & Veterans Affairs Committee. Senator Brewer’s bill would exempt 50% of military retirement from state income tax for all veterans filing their return in Nebraska, not just recent retirees. I have been working for such an exemption for as long as I have been in the Legislature, and I am hopeful that we can get LB 153 passed this year. With the Governor’s backing and a broad coalition of senators already signed on in support, we will work to make Nebraska even more welcoming for our veteran families.

If you would like to watch either of these hearings, or any other public business conducted by the Legislature, you are always welcome to come to the capitol and watch. For those of you who can’t make it in person, all committee hearings and legislative debates are streamed online by NET. You can find those live streams here, and can always check hearing schedules and our daily debate agenda at the legislature’s website here.

Bill Hearings This Week

The week of January 28th I had three public hearings for bills I introduced. The first was LB 306, which the Business & Labor Committee heard on Monday and advanced to the full Legislature on Thursday. Under current law, Nebraska workers are only eligible for unemployment if they are out of work through no fault of their own, or unless they had “good cause” for voluntarily leaving employment.  This adds caregiving for a family member with a serious health need to the list of reasons that are considered “good cause” for leaving employment. LB 306 allows caregivers to be eligible for unemployment benefits once they begin actively seeking work again. That may be because their caregiving duties have changed or ended, or because they are seeking a job on the night shift, for example – no matter the situation, this bill recognizes that uncompensated caregiving is often not a choice but a necessity, and will help caregivers financially once they are ready to return to the workforce. I am very pleased that the Business & Labor Committee acted so swiftly on LB 306, and I look forward to discussing the bill’s merits with my colleagues in the full Legislature.

My next hearing was on Tuesday January 29th and discussed LB 121. The bill addresses the limits on borrowing from banks by cities or municipalities. It specifies that loans are repaid in installments for a period of up to seven years and extends the limitations on borrowing for second-class cities. This bill was approved by the Urban Affairs Committee and was already debated and advanced on the first round of debate in the full Legislature on Friday February 1st.

Last was LB 322, which was heard in the Judiciary Committee on Friday February 1st. The bill deals with tobacco compliance checks performed by law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions and establishes a uniform process for those checks statewide. Compliance checks allow law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions to work with young people to test whether retailers are selling tobacco products to under-18s. We had a good hearing and I am hopeful LB 322 will be advanced to the full legislature quickly.


After the LB 322 hearing with Autumn Sky Burns, who first brought the bill to our attention and testified as a proponent at the hearing

Tele-Town Hall 

On Thursday January 31st I joined AARP of Nebraska for a tele-town hall about caregiving and paid family and medical leave. We had approximately 4000 Nebraskans on the phone over the course of the town hall, and had some great discussion about the importance of family caregiving and the challenges faced by workers who need time off to care for their or a family member’s health. Thank you to everyone who was able to join the call or follow along on the Facebook stream!  


Taking calls with Jina Ragland of AARP Nebraska

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Upcoming Tele-Town Hall

On January 31st I will be holding a tele-town hall with AARP to discuss paid family and medical leave and Nebraskans’ experiences with caregiving. The phone lines will be active from 6:00-7:00 pm that evening.

The call will also be streamed on AARP’s Facebook Live page, which you can access here. If you would like to participate in this tele-town hall, please click here to register. Click on the Paid Family Caregiving and Medical Leave” page under Events. You will be asked to provide your name, phone number, and email so that AARP can call you the night of the event and patch you in to the town hall. I look forward to speaking with everyone who is able to participate.

Bill Tracking Tool

My colleagues and I introduced 739 bills this year, which I’ve heard is the highest number for a 1st session for over a decade. There are also seven constitutional amendment resolutions and four other substantive resolutions, though resolutions can still be introduced after the first 10 days so those numbers will grow. If there are particular bills in that collection that you want to keep track of, our bill tracking tool is a great way to do so! You can sign up for the bill tracker here.

The Bill Tracker tool allows you to receive updates on up to 15 bills at a time for free or to sign up for a premium account to track an unlimited number of bills. If you check the box to receive email updates you will be sent a notification when a bill you selected is scheduled for a public hearing and when it is advanced through each round of debate.

Week 3 Bill Introduction

This week I introduced five more bills for a total of 22. You can see the full list of my bills here.  Below is a short summary of what I introduced this week; if you would like more information on any of these proposals, or if you would like to testify at a public hearing, please get in touch.

LB 439 requires that Medicaid cover at least 24 chiropractic treatments per benefit year.  

LB 566 requires the department of insurance to seek legislative approval and authorization prior to applying for and/or implementing a 1332 Waiver, or “state innovation” waiver.  State innovation waivers allow states to manipulate the types of health plans that are available on the ACA marketplace.

LB 613 is a bill I introduced based on the recommendations of Economic Development Task Force’s 2018 report. The bill effectively changes the end date of the New Markets Tax Credit, Historic Tax Credit, and Beginning Farmer Tax Credit from 2022 to July 2019. I introduced this bill as part of the wider discussion about Nebraska’s economic development framework, and hope the hearing will be an opportunity to assess these three programs.

LB 614 is a “revenue raiser package” aimed at providing property tax relief.  It provides additional revenue to school districts by eliminating some corporate deductions and exclusions, increasing taxes on cigarettes, soft drinks, candy, and bottled water, and ending the tangible personal property tax exemption.  Providing relief to school districts will drive local property taxes down. This is one of the many proposals that have been introduced this year, and I look forward to be at the table for discussions regarding property tax relief as a member of the revenue committee.  

LB 714 is the other bill that grew out of the Economic Development Task Force’s work in 2018. The bill creates the Nebraska Industrial New Job-Training Act and would provide an avenue to help fund train new employee training.

Education Press Conference

I joined with legislative colleagues and educational advocates on Friday morning for a press conference to highlight bills and budget proposals that will have a positive impact on K-12 education in Nebraska. Those bills included proposals on mental and behavioral health, student nutrition, early childhood education, career education, special education, and school safety.

I discussed LB 120, a bill of mine to improve mental health education options for teachers in our schools.  

Bill Hearings Begin

This week marked the start of public bill hearings, and I had one scheduled for the very first day. On Tuesday January 22nd the Education Committee held its hearing on LB 122. This bill brings Nebraska into legal compliance with recent federal policy changes by providing that veterans receiving vocational rehabilitation & education services through the VA will receive in-state resident tuition rates as long as they’re living here. I brought this bill at the request of the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is one of a number of bills introduced this year that will make Nebraska a better place for military members, veterans and their families to live.

You can find the schedule for bill hearings here. Committees must give at least one week’s notice to the public before a hearing, so the schedule will continue to be updated as the session progresses.

Permanent Rules Approved

On Tuesday and Wednesday this week the Legislature debated and approved our permanent rules. Two small changes were made: the first of which allows the Legislature’s Planning Committee to designate one priority bill each session, and a second which prevents a bill from being killed by unanimous consent without the introducer’s knowledge. Unlike in 2017, where the rules debate dragged on for fully half of the first session, this year’s discussion was concise and business-like. I hope this is a sign of good things to come in the 106th Legislature – a signal that the body is ready to rediscover the habits of collegiality and mutual understanding that sometimes seemed to be lacking last session.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

PFML Press Conference 

On Tuesday January 15th Senator Machaela Cavanaugh and I hosted a press conference to announce our sponsorship of the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act. We were joined by friends and advocates who work with a wide variety of Nebraskans, from babies to working families to the elderly. The Nebraska Legislature’s nonpartisan structure makes these issue coalitions extremely important.

I want to thank everyone who was able to attend and show their support for LB 311, as well as all those who have emailed or called to share how important paid leave policies are to you. If you are interested in advocating for the bill, please contact my office.

Week 2 Bill Introduction

This week we had five full days of bill introduction, bringing the total introduced since last week to over 400 bills and several constitutional amendments. I introduced a further 10 bills this week. They are:

LB 235 allows for those making home brewed alcohol to serve samples at festivals and fundraisers without a permit, so long as they are not selling the samples and the event is legally conducted under the Nebraska Liquor Control Act.

LB 236 – Provides that municipalities who have adopted the Nebraska Advantage Transformational Tourism and Redevelopment Act can receive information on the sales and use tax returns for retailers located within a redevelopment area via secure electronic means from the Nebraska Department of Revenue.

LB 237 – Restores a .5% monthly commission to counties across the state for all motor vehicle sales tax collections over $3,000. This is part of my efforts to address unfunded mandates to counties, and supporting our counties is an important part of the property tax equation.  

LB 304 is similar to the Cottage Foods Law I introduced last year (LB764). The bill allows producers of non-potentially hazardous foods, or cottage food producers, to sell the same foods they can already sell at farmers markets from their homes or at public events so long as food are properly labeled and producers follow the food safety regulations of the county.  This includes items that are not time/temperature controlled for safety, such as baked goods, jams and jellies, and fresh produce.

LB 305 or the “Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act” requires employers with four or more employees to provide employees with one hour of “sick and safe” leave for every thirty hours worked.  Employers who choose to provide comparable benefits to employees on their own can be exempt from this requirement. Safe leave can be used by employees experiencing domestic violence or stalking.  

LB 306 allows caregivers to be eligible for unemployment benefits until they are able to return to work.  Under current law, Nebraska workers are only eligible for unemployment if they are out of work through no fault of their own, or unless they had “good cause” for voluntarily leaving employment.  This adds caregiving for a family member with a serious health need to the list of reasons that are considered “good cause” for leaving employment.

LB 311 is the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act, mentioned above. The Act will provide time off with partial wage replacement for qualifying reasons for all workers covered by unemployment insurance. The bill provides six weeks to care for a family member with a serious health condition or a military family member preparing for or returning from deployment, and twelve weeks to care for a new child or for one’s own health condition.  Nebraskans value our families and our workers who contribute to a growing economy and thriving communities, and this Act will result in healthier families at home and more productive employees at work.

LB 322 establishes a uniform process for tobacco compliance checks performed by law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions.  Tobacco compliance checks allow law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions to work with young people to test whether tobacco sellers are unlawfully providing tobacco to underage persons.  

LB 323 amends eligibility criteria for Nebraska’s Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MIWD) program.  This program allows individuals with disabilities to pay a premium for, or “buy-in” to Medicaid coverage while working and earning an income that puts them over the traditional eligibility threshold.  Current eligibility criteria is outdated and prevents persons who should otherwise qualify from participating in the program.

LB 365 creates a centralized registry where Nebraskans can store advance healthcare directives, or instructions containing their wishes for end-of-life medical treatment, where it can be accessed by a medical professional when necessary.  

Meet Our Intern – Lillian Butler-Hale 

Our intern for this legislative session is Lillian Butler-Hale from Fort Collins, Colorado. Lillian is a junior at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln studying Sociology, Spanish and Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. Though she has cherished her time at Nebraska she hopes to return to Colorado for law school after graduation, where she can hike, ski and camp more often. When she is not studying or working, she loves to sing, watch movies and spend time with any/all dogs or babies. She is involved with the Student Ethics Board and is a member of Alpha Phi.

Lillian’s responsibilities here at the capitol include assisting with administrative tasks, doing research and helping Christina and Hanna. We are excited to have her and look forward to an especially productive 2019!

Rules Committee Hearing

Last week I was elected Chair of the Rules Committee. The committee held its public hearing on Wednesday January 16th to discuss the proposed rule changes submitted by senators last week. We then met in executive session to discuss the proposals in more depth. On Friday the Committee reported its recommendations to the full Legislature, and I anticipate that we will begin debate on those proposals on Tuesday January 22nd.

Capitol Visitors – Mission Middle School

On Tuesday January 15th a group of students from Mission Middle School visited the capitol, and I was very happy to be able to meet them. They are participating in a national history contest and came to Lincoln to do some research in the State Archives. Their projects are about the history of women’s suffrage, organ donation, the Holocaust, the history and invention of airplanes, and the first tornado forecast.

This creative group are a great representation of the good things going on in our schools, and I wish them the best with their competition!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

106th Legislature, First Session Convenes 

Wednesday January 9th was the first day of the 106th Legislature. Together with my 48 fellow senators, both new and returning, I look forward to a productive session serving you all!


My Legislative Aide Hanna Murdoch, Administrative Aide Christina Mayer, and I in the Chamber on the first day of session

Rules Committee Chairmanship

This year I had the honor of being elected as Chair of the Rules Committee. Rules is a Select Committee that meets at the beginning of each biennium to discuss proposed changes to the Legislature’s permanent operating rules. Any senator can submit a rule change proposal. Once proposals have been submitted, a public hearing that runs just like a regular bill hearing will be held. This year the hearing will take place on Wednesday January 16th at 1:30 pm in room 1525 at the capitol. Each proposed change will begin with comments from the introducer, followed by an opportunity for members of the public to share their thoughts. If you would like to see all of the proposed changes ahead of time, please contact my office. We will have the final packet of rules compiled and available to share on Tuesday morning.

New Office – Room 1012

While my original intention was to stay put in my current capital office, we have now moved into room 1012. But don’t worry if you want to find us and aren’t sure where to go – our new office is right next door to the old one! You are most welcome to visit any time.

Inaugural Ceremonies

The 106th session began with two days of swearing-in ceremonies. On Wednesday January 9th we welcomed 13 new senators to the body and welcomed back a further 13 who won re-election to a second term in November. All of those senators gathered at the front of the George W. Norris Legislative Chamber on Wednesday morning and took an oath to uphold our Constitution and serve the Legislature with integrity.

On Thursday afternoon we held inaugural ceremonies for the executive offices – Governor Pete Ricketts, Lieutenant Governor Mike Foley, Supreme Court Justice Stephanie Stacy, Secretary of State Bob Evnen, Treasurer John Murante, Auditor Charlie Janssen, Attorney General Doug Peterson, Public Service Commissioner Tim Schram, State Board of Education members Maureen Nickels and Robin Stevens, and University of Nebraska Regents Elizabeth O’Connor, Rob Schafer, and Barbara Weitz.

Week 1 Bill Introduction

Other than swearing in new colleagues and executive officers, our primary business for this week was the introduction of new bills. Because this is the beginning of the new biennium, bills from last session do not carry over and we are starting with a completely blank slate. We did not do bill introduction on Monday; on Tuesday and Wednesday senators introduced 218 new bills. Of those bills, seven were mine. I will give a more in-depth description of my bills as they come up for public hearings in the next few months. Briefly, however, my bills this week are:

LB 120 amends an existing requirement for school staff to complete a one-hour suicide prevention training to allow schools to cover a wider range of topics relating to behavioral and mental health within the training.

LB 121 is a bill relating to limits on borrowing from banks by cities or municipalities. It specifies that loans are repaid in installments for a period of up to seven years and extends the limitations on borrowing for second-class cities.

LB 122 brings us into compliance with recent federal policy changes. It provides that veterans receiving vocational rehabilitation & education services through the VA shall receive in-state resident tuition rates for higher education if they are registered to vote in Nebraska and intend to become a Nebraska resident. I brought this bill at the request of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

LB 123 fixes an issue of compliance for the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired. A current requirement in the Taxpayer Transparency Act requires them to publish information about their contracts with individuals receiving services online, which is in conflict with the Commission’s confidentiality policies.  

LB 124 clarifies that municipalities can jointly administer a clean energy assessment district under the Property Assessment Clean Energy Act, or PACE program.  This is a “cleanup” bill that clarifies language to reflect the original intent of the bill.

LB 210 defines electioneering communications for candidate elections and ballot measures and requires reporting and disclosure of certain electioneering communications that are publicly distributed 30 days immediately preceding an election, refer to a clearly identified candidate or ballot issue, and are directed at the electorate of the office sought by that candidate or the voters voting on the ballot initiative.  

LB 211 provides that county offices be elected on a nonpartisan ballot. Those offices include county clerk, register of deeds, assessor, sheriff, treasurer, surveyor, county attorney, public defender, clerk of the district court, county engineer, and county commissioners and supervisors.

New Rooms and Detours at the Capitol 

The State Capitol is currently undergoing a lot of construction in the southwest wing, which means there have been significant changes in how the capitol looks and where senators and other offices are located. 18 offices are located up in the tower, and seven committee chair offices moved to a different location on the 1st or 2nd floors. It is therefore advisable that if you are coming to the capitol to visit a particular senator, you check their legislative website (the list is here) and look up whether they have moved. For senators in the tower you will need to call their office and have a staff member come down to get you, as the elevators no longer stop on the 8th, 11th, 12th and 13th floors unless you have an authorized security badge. The stairs by the west doors are also inaccessible, so to go upstairs I recommend you use the stairs/elevator in the middle of the building by the information desk.

There are also new room numbers to keep in mind once committee hearings begin on Tuesday January 22nd. Rooms 1113 and 2012 are no longer accessible, so other committees have shifted around to make sure we have enough room. The biggest change is that the Judiciary and Transportation & Telecommunications Committees will meet upstairs in the Warner Chamber. On Monday December 17th the Transportation Committee held an interim hearing on autonomous vehicle operations in Nebraska (LR 424) up in the Warner Chamber as a test run, so it should be a smooth transition. If you are coming to the capitol to testify on a bill, though, I recommend giving yourself some extra time in case your hearing is in a different spot than usual and you need to locate a new room. Below is a map of the capitol with construction zones marked off, committee hearing rooms circled in blue, and my office circled in orange.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislative Update: December 2018
December 22nd, 2018

Session Begins January 9th

This will be my last update during the interim – the next time you hear from me will be at the end of week that the 106th Legislature convenes on January 9th. Here’s a quick overview of how the first few days of session will go:

On January 9th, Day 1, the Legislature will hold its opening ceremonies. All newly elected and re-elected senators will be sworn in, temporary operating rules will be adopted, and the Clerk of the Legislature and other administrative officers will be formally re-appointed. Then we will move on to elect the Speaker from among the 49 senators. Next we will elect Chairs to the various standing and select committees, which is done by secret ballot. Once those Chair positions are finalized, the crazy task of assigning and moving offices begins. I intend to stay put in room 1016 this session, so you will be able to find us there in the northwest quad!

On January 10th, Day 2, senators will begin to introduce bills. Our formal program for Day 2 is usually a swearing-in ceremony for new and returning members of the Board of Regents, Board of Education, Public Service Commission, and Nebraska Supreme Court.

On January 11th, Day 3, our only formal business is typically new bill introduction.

Once the Speaker is elected on Day 1, he or she will finalize the (now tentative) legislative calendar for 2019. You can find the current proposed calendar here. In our next update I will give an overview of key dates for the whole session – when committee bill hearings will start and end, statutory deadlines for the budget, etc. I look forward to joining all my new and returning colleagues to have a productive 2019 session.

National Guard Birthday 

On December 14th the National Guard celebrated its 382nd birthday at a ceremony in the Capitol rotunda. The National Guard, established in 1636 as a collection of militia units in Massachusetts, today consists of “citizen-soldiers” who train and serve part-time while simultaneously holding civilian employment. National Guard regiments have deployed in every major combat operation in US History. Nebraska’s National Guard was organized in 1854, and will celebrate its 164th birthday on December 23rd.

The capitol ceremony was a wonderful celebration of our state’s National Guardsmen. Governor Ricketts, the Commander-in-Chief of the Nebraska National Guard, spoke about the sacrifices that members have made over the years – from giving up time with their families to giving their lives. An ensemble of the National Guard 43rd Army Band, based in Nebraska, provided delightful music for the occasion. It was an honor to attend and celebrate all the men and women who have served.

Military Officers Association of America

The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Heartland of America Chapter held its annual dinner on December 12th. I was honored to be recognized by the Association and Colonel Dan Donovan, the Chapter President.

Bellevue Ornament on the Capitol Tree

This year, in honor of the state’s sesquicentennial, First Lady Susanne Shore led an effort to update the decorations on the Capitol Christmas tree. 316 design proposals, all in the shape of Nebraska, were submitted by artists from around the state, and 166 were selected as finalists to be created and put on the tree. One of the ornaments was created by Bellevue’s own Alaina Jenkins.

Alaina called her creation “Beautiful Corn of Nebraska,” and in her artist’s note said that “I have created the corn landscape of Nebraska. Many people say that Nebraska is just a ‘pass-over’ state. But in my eyes, I think the natural view of corn, trees, grass and flowers are beautiful.”

I agree! Thank you to Alaina and all the other talented Nebraskans who helped bring some of our state’s beauty into the Capitol this Christmas season.

You can view all of the wonderful ornaments up close here, though of course I also encourage you to come see them in person and in their full splendor at the Capitol!

Farmers Union Panel

On December 7th I joined five of my legislative colleagues on a panel at the Nebraska Farmers Union Annual Convention in Lincoln. Made up of three current senators and three senators-elect, the panel was an opportunity for us to preview and discuss the topics and priorities that are likely to come up in the 2019 session.

Holiday Office Closures

All state offices will be closed on on Christmas Eve (Monday December 24th), Christmas Day (Tuesday December 25th), and New Year’s Day (Tuesday January 1st). If you need any assistance on those days please either send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

I wish you and yours a very happy holiday season!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

 

New Legislative Colleagues

The results of the election on November 6th mean we will welcome 11 new senators to the body when the 106th Legislature convenes on January 9th, 2019. I was able to meet many of those new colleagues for the first time at the annual Legislative Council meeting on November 15th and 16th in Nebraska City. The gathering is an opportunity for everyone – departing senators, senators-elect, and incumbents – to discuss priorities, policy ideas, and expectations for the next session.

The Legislative Council meeting is also a chance to get to know each other as people, which is a key component to a fruitful working relationship that is too often overlooked. I look forward to working with all of them!

Medicaid Expansion

In addition to electing their representatives to state, local, and federal seats, the majority of voters approved the Medicaid expansion initiative. This expansion will be a boon to Nebraskans who currently fall into the coverage gap.

MHEC OER Conference

The Midwestern Higher Education Commission (MHEC) has partnered with the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to promote open educational resources (OER). OER refers to teaching, learning, and research materials that are free for people everywhere to use and repurpose. OER is an important strategy to reduce textbook costs for students.

I spent November 28th-30th in Chicago for a summit to discuss state and regional strategies for strengthening OER initiatives, funding sources for launching OER efforts, and best state and institutional policy practices. I was joined by a number of educational professionals and legislators from across the Midwest in a productive few days of planning and discussion.

The Nebraska delegation will come home with new ideas and a stronger network as we work to make OER available to our students.

Committee Interim Hearings

This month I attended two interim hearings at the capitol. The first was a hearing for the Health and Human Services Committee on November 8th to discuss the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA). This federal regulation allows states to use certain child welfare funds for the purpose of “prevention services” in families that are involved in the child welfare system, and emphasizes the use of family foster homes rather than group placements for children in state care. The hearing was held to discuss how the FFPSA might impact Nebraska’s child welfare systems. The National Conference of State Legislatures published a detailed explanation of the FFPSA’s changes, which can be found here.

On November 27th the Business & Labor Committee held a public hearing to consider the consequences of adopting a worker’s compensation drug formulary. A drug formulary would instruct doctors on the preferred drugs for different symptoms and require additional justification for drugs that are not on the formulary. Representatives from commonly used formularies came to explain how their formularies use evidence-based guidelines. I expect that we will see a bill to move to a formulary in the next session. I will be cautious about this policy change because of the impact it may have on the ability of injured workers to get the care that they and their doctors agree is necessary.

ACS CAN Policy Forum

The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network held a forum on November 13th to talk about access to healthcare for those who have been diagnosed with or who have recovered from cancer. I served on a panel of professionals who work in the public health, insurance, and patient advocate fields.

Among other policy issues important to cancer patients, we discussed the possible impacts of Medicaid expansion and the challenges of healthcare access in rural areas.

Sarpy Law Academy

Each year the Sarpy County Attorney and Sarpy County Teen Court hold a Law Academy for students in 7th to 12th grade in the Omaha, Papillion, Bellevue, and Millard areas. These students, who are often interested in public service careers and want to learn more about government, heard from a variety of speakers over four evening sessions. Speakers included judges, military officers and lawyers. I spoke to the group on November 8th about the Legislature and my role in the judicial process. I enjoyed answering the students’ great questions and helping them to understand the complexities of government.

Holiday Office Closures

To allow my staff to celebrate with their families, my office will be closed on December 24th. All state offices will be closed on Christmas Day, December 25th, and New Year’s Day, January 1st. If you need any assistance on those days please either send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

I wish you and yours a very happy holiday season!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Economic Development Task Force

The Economic Development Task Force, of which I am chair, has continued its work this interim. If you recall, last year the Task Force focused on hearing from a broad range of economic development specialists, businesses, and community organizations to get an idea of Nebraska’s biggest economic challenges and opportunities. Our final report from that work, which was issued in December 2017, can be found here.

The Task Force has spent this interim focusing in on some of the key issues we identified in that 2017 report. One of the top priorities has been to work through the possibilities for the future of the Advantage Act, Nebraska’s primary business incentive program, which is set to expire in 2020. The Task Force is working to identify common ground among legislators, explore novel ideas modeled on other state programs, and incorporate person-centered development in whatever we develop to replace the Advantage Act. It is still very much a work in progress, but I am hopeful that we can find solutions that will leave the state in a better position to harness its economic potential and support the workers who make our economy tick.

Holland Honor Roll

On October 18th I was honored, along with a number of my legislative colleagues, to be named to the Holland Honor Roll.

 

Maintained by the Holland Children’s Movement, the Honor Roll recognizes senators who have a strong record of supporting children and working families in the Legislature. I pledge to keep working for our kids and our families as long as I remain your state senator.

MOMS Community Internship

Each year the Metro Omaha Medical Society (MOMS) arranges shadow experiences for community leaders. The program, known as the Community Internship Program, pairs participants with medical providers as they go about their daily practice. This year I was able to participate, and had the pleasure of shadowing Dr. Donna Faber at OneWorld Community Health Center on October 4th. The Community Internship Program was a valuable experience, and I am glad I was able to participate this year.

Fairview Elementary Visit

Fairview Elementary School’s 4th graders made their way to the state capitol on October 18th. My staff met with the students, who were extra-engaged and asked all kinds of great questions about our legislative process, checks and balances, and the history of the building. The future is bright for these young people, and I hope they enjoyed their visit!

REASON Group Talk

The Rationalists, Empiricists And Skeptics Of Nebraska (REASON) held its annual fall forum on October 30th. This event has featured speakers on a wide variety of topics over the years, ranging from research at the Omaha Zoo to public education trends to social media. This year I gave a talk about midterm patterns and predictions. It was a lively group and we had a great discussion.

Veterans Day State Office Closure

All state offices, including my own, will be closed on Monday November 12th in observation of Veterans Day. If you need anything that day, please leave a voicemail or send and email. Our office will reopen on Tuesday.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislative Update: September 2018
September 29th, 2018

Bellevue Town Hall

On September 27th Mayor Rita Sanders and I co-hosted a town hall at Richmont Village. Sarpy County Commissioner Brian Zuger and Bellevue City Councilman John Hansen were also in attendance. We had a great turnout, and had good conversations with attendees about what’s going on at the state, county, and city levels of government. Many thanks to all those who attended!

Military Spouse/Transitioning Service Member Meeting 

The Offutt Enlisted Spouses Club and Bellevue/Offutt Rising Professionals are two groups that work with military families to help them succeed and make Bellevue more welcoming. The two organizations held a joint meeting on September 26th to discuss professional licensing barriers for military spouses and military members transitioning back to civilian life. This interim my office has been working on LR436, a study I introduced to examine the steps taken by the state to support transitioning military members and military families. The study is also focused on what else can and should be done to make full and gainful employment easier for these populations. Input we received at the OESC/BORP meeting gives us a deeper understanding of both the state’s challenges and opportunities in this area.

Paid Family Leave Research

For the last few months my office has also been conducting research on paid family leave policies in Nebraska. As part of those efforts, I am seeking input from the business community and would love to hear from you! If you own a business that offers Paid Family Leave (PFL) or a business that would like to offer PFL but cannot do so at this time, and you are willing to share your experiences, please contact my office. Your assistance is appreciated!

CBD UNMC Results

The FDA announced its intention to approve Epidiolex, a cannabidiol oil therapy, in late June. The University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) was in the process of conducting a study on that same drug, as allowed by my LB390 in 2015. This month UNMC released its annual report on that study, which confirmed that the majority of patients enrolled saw benefits after taking Epidiolex. I am thrilled for the patients and families who have already benefited from this trial, and for all those who may do so in the future as the drug becomes more widely available. I am also proud that our university system has contributed to the scientific record for this product. If you would like to read UNMC’s annual report, it can be found here.

Policy Summit Season

Each fall as the next session approaches, various organizations hold informational gatherings to share information and suggestions for potential legislation – a time my staff have dubbed “Policy Summit Season.” In September my office attended two such summits, hosted by OpenSky (September 5th) and the Platte Institute (September 13th). These summits covered everything from property and business taxes to rural demographics, and from Medicaid expansion to professional licensing. These summits are a good opportunity to hear new ideas and mull over existing priorities.

Twin Ridge Elementary Visit 

LD 45 had its first capitol visitors of the 2018-19 school year on September 12th, when 4th graders from Twin Ridge Elementary came to Lincoln to learn about their state government. My staff met them up in the main rotunda and talked about what they can do to be good leaders now and in the future.

I hope these bright young people had a wonderful time in their state capitol!

Radio Talking Book Service Interview

I had the opportunity to tour the Radio Talking Book Service (RTBS) broadcasting office and do a short interview on-air about the upcoming session on September 27th. RTBS provides a unique service to blind, elderly, and learning disabled students throughout Nebraska who have trouble reading printed text. A dedicated team of staff and volunteers read daily newspapers, magazines, and other publications live on air, and host other live programs to share news on sports, health, and the community. RTBS offers a way to access local, current information, and it was a pleasure to join them.

Bellevue Mobile Food Pantry

Bellevue Public Schools and the Food Bank for the Heartland (FBH) are partnering again this year to bring FBH’s mobile food pantry to Bellevue. The mobile pantry will be at Mission Middle School on the third Wednesday of each month from 5:00-6:30 pm. A clothing closet for 12-18-year-olds will also be open during those times. Please spread the word about this important service to anyone you know who may be in need of a little extra help. You can check on other mobile pantry locations in the Omaha metro area and beyond here.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1016, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45
Room #1012
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-2615
Email: scrawford@leg.ne.gov
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