NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE

The official site of the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature

Carol Blood

Sen. Carol Blood

District 3

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at cblood@leg.ne.gov

Welcome
January 6th, 2021

Thank you for visiting my website. It is an honor to represent the people of the 3rd legislative district in the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature.

You’ll find my contact information on the right side of this page, as well as a list of the bills I’ve introduced this session and the committees on which I serve. Please feel free to contact me and my staff about proposed legislation or any other issues you would like to address.

Sincerely,
Sen. Carol Blood

Legislative Update

Good morning, Nebraska!

Next week is the final day of committee hearings for most of us, though the Judiciary committee will keep on going as they had over 150 bills assigned to them this year. Far more than any other committee. The week is going to be a busy one for our office as we have five bills up in various committees.

Next Monday afternoon I present LB12 in the Transportation and Telecommunication Committee and LB20 in front of the Banking, Commerce, and Insurance committee.

LB12 is my Commuter Rail Study bill. This bill would task the Department of Transportation to study the effectiveness, cost, and need for a commuter rail line between Lincoln and Omaha. It would then submit a report on the study to the legislature. Among other reasons I brought this bill, I think it will greatly help reduce the traffic on Highway 6 and I-80. Especially when this route gets traveled, the most, during Husker game days. Anyone who has been on I-80 a few hours before or a few hours after a Husker game knows the pain of the interstate traffic jam.

LB20 is my women’s health equity bill. This will reduce interruptions in birth control, helping to reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion by having insurers cover the number of contraceptives dispensed in accordance with the prescription—up to 12 months at a time but it won’t require a 12-month supply on the first pickup. The bill allows an initial 3-month prescription to make sure it is safe to use prior to expanding it. The intent is to close health inequities in rural Nebraska, those reliant on public transportation, and women who must travel for work or abroad.
This also a cost-saving measure for the state. One study found that the longer prescription period led to fewer gaps in taking contraceptives. The study found unwanted pregnancies can be reduced by as much as 30 percent. When you consider that providing a year’s worth of contraceptives cost $365 compared to birthing services that run near $5,000; it’s a no-brainer.

On Tuesday, I’ll present LB478, my firefighter’s retirement bill to the Nebraska Retirement Systems Committee. This bill would move all First Class city firefighters’ pension and retirement funds over to the state’s Public Employees’ Cash Balance Retirement Plan. They currently have a simple 401K program that does not provide enough money for these firefighters to retire on, forcing them to work later into life than they should, thereby putting themselves and others in harm’s way.

Wednesday sees my LB13 slated for hearing with the Judiciary Committee. The bill deals with protection orders from another state when that protection order relates to domestic or family abuse. Currently, certain prohibitions are already in place for Nebraska but we want to harmonize the language to include orders that might be issued in other states and jurisdictions as there have been examples where these individuals have fallen through the cracks, to the detriment of the victim.

Finally, on Thursday, LB8 will get heard by the Government, Military, and Veterans Affairs committee. This bill addresses gaps in Nebraska’s current statute that enable “dark money” special interest groups to place influential ads. These ads may incorrectly sway voters during elections without knowing who is behind them. This would fill in the gaps by requiring anyone who makes an advertisement that costs more than $1,000 to file a form with the election commission. This is, by the way, the same thing everyone else has to do. It’s time for the legislature to put its money where it’s mouth is when it comes to transparency. This bill will do that.

This past week I also had a hearing on LB5, the Purple Star Schools Program bill. It encourages but doesn’t require every school in the state to appoint a “military liaison” who will then create programming for students who might be recent transfers into the school district after moving here with their military family. The liaison may also set up a website that demonstrates how to establish a “military-friendly” atmosphere at the school. Choosing to participate in the programming would then designate the school as a “Purple Star” school.

We also got good news this week in regards to one of my bills that we’ve already had a hearing on. LB6, which would change provisions relating to the taxation of military retirement benefits. This is a bit of a tweak from last year’s military retirement bill, LB153. However, that bill was based on 1099’s received from the DOD. There are military retirees that do not receive form 1099 from the US DOD but receive it from The Office of Personnel Management. They are being told they’re not eligible under 153 and LB6 would make them eligible for the benefits. That bill’s language was folded into Senator Brewer’s larger military retirement bill, LB387, and advanced from the committee on Thursday. It will now go in front of the full legislature for debate and we have high hopes of its passage.

A reminder that if you want to participate in any of the hearings on my bills, there have been some changes to the way they are carried out this year. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. His office set up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website.

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before and they must be submitted to specially designated committee emails, rather than the clerk or the chairperson directly.

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.


Meet Sarah!
We want to introduce you to our new intern Sarah Lies, who is working with us under the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Honors Legislative Internship Program. Sarah grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, and is the only girl among five brothers. Having been homeschooled through high school, Sarah says that she is incredibly grateful to her parents for their continued investment and encouragement.

Now, she is a junior at UNL dual majoring in Global Studies and Political Science and minoring in Arabic and Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. She is involved as a Resident Assistant in Sandoz Hall and the World Youth Alliance organization. In her free time, she enjoys playing piano, going rock climbing, and spending time with friends. Upon graduation, Sarah hopes to pursue a career working in foreign affairs for the United States Federal Government.


Water Roundtable In March
Nebraskans continue to reach out to me about the potential for flooding due to the record amounts of snow we have received. Here is an opportunity to learn more about the history, impact, outlook, and preparation regarding ice jams for the upcoming 2021 spring season. This will be an excellent opportunity to have your questions answered, as well.   Please share this information with any interested parties.

Please join the 2021 Water Roundtable presentation being held on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 at 8:00 am (Central Time)  This will be a webinar format and will feature Bryan Tuma, Assistant Director of NEMA.

You can register for this Webinar here.

Questions regarding the event can be directed to the Nebraska Water Resources Association at 402-476-1528


Rosters Are Out
After a long wait, the new rosters are officially out! If you would like one, don’t hesitate to contact our office and we’ll be happy to mail you one.


It’s A Seussathon!
For something a bit more fun, you can take part in next week’s Bellevue Public Library Seussathon.  It will be virtual this year, with special guest readers in the Zoom room every half hour. You can just head over to the event’s calendar and grab the zoom link. Then join in next Tuesday!


COVID-19 Vaccine Update
The Sarpy/Cass County Health Department issued an update on the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine. The department has officially entered into Phase 1B.

Unfortunately for those with underlying health conditions who were hoping to be vaccinated sooner, Governor Ricketts announced last week that “High-Risk” individuals won’t be receiving their vaccinations during Phase 1B. This phase is expected to last until April.

However, Sarpy/Cass residents born in 1951 or before are eligible to schedule an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccination.

You do not need the Sarpy/Cass Health Department to schedule this appointment for you. Please visit this website to view all the vaccine clinic options in our communities. Select the clinic that works best for you, and click or call that individual clinic to schedule your appointment.

Please keep in mind that scheduling at this time is limited to those residents born in 1951 or before. Appointments made for non-residents or those outside the age range will be canceled by the individual clinics.

If you do have any questions there is a number you can call to get assistance. 402-339-4334 and press option 1.

In preparation for your name being called to get vaccinated, the state does offer a website where you can register to be notified when it’s your turn. You can sign up at this link.

Good morning, Nebraska!

We kicked the week off with floor debate on bills for the first time this session. With the change in our daily schedule, we had been involved in all-day hearings for most of the session but on Tuesday, we opened the morning with General File debate on the floor.

We almost completed the entire agenda, eventually passing 22 separate bills onto select file. It was indeed an unusual break from all-day hearings. On Wednesday we returned to our normal schedule. We won’t be returning to floor debate until March 9. At that point, most of the committee hearings will be over (with the exception of Judiciary) and soon after that week, we’ll transition to all-day floor debate.

On Wednesday, I was in front of the Health and Human Services committee for the hearing on LB554, which is my third interstate compact bill this session. LB554 adopts the Licensed
Professional Counselors Interstate Compact in order to create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. This is a brand new compact, though there are already several states looking to adopt it. Like the others of this kind, it will go “live” when 10 states join. We should be clear that our office also supports reciprocity, but that does not address our military spouse who must move every 2-3 years. We not only want them to be able to work into Nebraska without additional hurdles, but move to their next post and be able to get to work quickly as well. That’s why our office LOVES these compacts and enjoys working with our friends in the military families office at the DOD on your behalf. every year.

Next week I will have a hearing for LB5 in front of the Education Committee. The bill encourages but doesn’t require every school in the state to appoint a “military liaison” who will then create programming for students who might be recent transfers into the school district after moving to Nebraska with their military family. The liaison may also set up a website that demonstrates how to establish a “military-friendly” atmosphere at the school. Choosing to participate in the programming would then designate the school as a “Purple Star” school.

A reminder that if you want to participate in any of the hearings on my bills, there have been some changes to the way they are carried out this year. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. His office set up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website. 

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before and they must be submitted to specially designated committee emails, rather than the clerk or the chairperson directly. 

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.


Food Pantry
The winter has been all the more difficult this year thanks to the extreme weather and the coronavirus pandemic. If you are someone in need, you can head out to the Glory Tabernacle church later this morning and pick up some food and winter clothing. You can also go and donate winter clothes or food, if you have some to share.
ENOA Meeting In March
The Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging is going to be having a virtual meeting on March 1 to discuss changes they are making to their routes. The agency is no longer going to offering rides that are strictly inside an area that is defined as “Urbanized Areas” of Omaha. That includes most of Sarpy and Cass county. They will still allow for rides from Bellevue, Papillion and LaVista to rural areas, and will allow rides from rural areas to the Urbanized Omaha Area.

The changes are currently slated to go into effect on July 1.

If this plan does go into effect, it’s going to make things quite hard for Sarpy and Cass county’s aging population to get around. I would encourage everyone to listen in on this meeting and make your voice heard in hopes of convincing ENOA to change its plans.

This particular change was on the agenda two years ago but they were able to scrap it, after additional funding was made available. It can be changed again if enough people fight for it.

All the information on the meeting can be found on ENOA’s official website here.


COVID-19 Vaccine Update
The Sarpy/Cass County Health Department issued an update on the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine. The department has officially entered into Phase 1B.

Unfortunately for those with underlying health conditions who were hoping to be vaccinated sooner, Governor Ricketts announced this week that “High-Risk” individuals won’t be receiving their vaccinations during Phase 1B.

However, Sarpy/Cass residents born in 1951 or before are eligible to schedule an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccination.

You do not need the Sarpy/Cass Health Department to schedule this appointment for you. Please visit this website to view all the vaccine clinic options in our communities. Select the clinic that works best for you, and click or call that individual clinic to schedule your appointment.

Please keep in mind that scheduling at this time is limited to those residents born in 1951 or before. Appointments made for non-residents or those outside the age range will be canceled by the individual clinics.

If you do have any questions there is a number you can call to get assistance. 402-339-4334 and press option 1.

In preparation for your name being called to get vaccinated, the state does offer a website where you can register to be notified when it’s your turn. You can sign up at this link.

Legislative Update

Good morning, Nebraska!

We kicked the week off with LB9 on Tuesday in front of the Urban Affairs committee. This bill changes annexation requirements and property tax special valuation provisions for cities that might encompass or be built near a military installation. The way state law is currently written, annexation has to include contiguous or adjacent land, but that’s impossible for cities like Bellevue which have federally owned or NRD land in the middle of a potential annexation area. This would allow those cities to “cross” over NRD or Federal land. The special valuation provisions make it so rural landowners who are being annexed in aren’t “punished” by the annexation by a change in their valuation. If passed, this bill will change the future path of growth and economic development for the Bellevue community for the better.

Next week, I have one bill hearing, on Wednesday, February 17, in front of the Health and Human Services committee. LB554 is my third interstate compact bill this session. LB554 adopts the Licensed Professional Counselors Interstate Compact in order to create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. This is a brand new compact, though there are already several states looking to adopt it. Like the others of this kind, it will go “live” when 10 states join. We should be clear that our office also supports reciprocity, but that does not address or military spouse who must move every 2-3 years. We not only want them to be able to work into Nebraska without additional hurdles, but move to their next post and be able to get to work quickly as well. That’s why our office LOVES these compacts and enjoys working with our friends at the DOD on your behalf. every year.

I also received some good news on LB476. That bill will use Nebraska’s existing Stroke System of Care as a foundation to establish and implement an improvement plan for a more comprehensive system for stroke response and treatment. The bill requires DHHS to collaborate with the task force to maintain a statewide stroke data registry using the ‘Get with the Guidelines’ stroke data set provided by the American Heart Association. It was advanced out of the Health and Human Services Committee this week to the floor and general file. Hopefully, we’ll be taking it up for debate in front of the entire legislature very soon and help it to become law yet in 2021.

I’ve also been happy to see several bills that I cosponsored get voted out of committee. That includes LB4, which raises the tuition assistance for undergraduate education under the Reserve Tuition Credit from 50 percent to 75 percent. It also removes a restriction that anyone with more than 10 years of military service couldn’t access the credit.

LB255 is another one I’m proud to support as it benefits families of first responders who gave their lives to help others. The bill creates the In the Line Of Duty Compensation Act to provide a one-time death benefit to the family of a firefighter, law enforcement officer, or another first responder who dies in the line of duty.

A reminder that if you want to participate in any of the hearings on my bills, there have been some changes to the way they are carried out this year. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. His office set up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website. 

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before and they must be submitted to specially designated committee emails, rather than the clerk or the chairperson directly. 

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.

Head Start Sarpy Accepting Applications
Sarpy County/ESU #3 HEAD START is accepting applications for the 2021-2022 School Year!Head Start has no cost pre-k and early childhood programs for children from birth to age 5.
The only requirement is that families that want to take advantage of this program must live in Sarpy County and meet certain income requirements.
You can apply online at Sarpy Head Start’s official webpage and click on the “apply now” section. If you need assistance, please call 402-597-4982.


COVID-19 Vaccine Update
The Sarpy/Cass County Health Department issued an update on the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine. The department has officially entered into Phase 1B where members of the public will begin getting vaccinated.

As is the case everywhere in the state at this point, the health department has started vaccinating the elderly first and is currently working on getting those who are 80 and over, covered. They will then move to 75 and over, then 70 and over, 65 and over and then onto other popular groups. However, the department is also working on getting first responders and educators vaccinated during this phase, though it’s still a lengthy process. The focus, after the aged, is indeed first responders. Then utility workers, homeless shelter employees, corrections officers, and then teachers.

If you do have any questions about the process the department is using in order to get people vaccinated, there is a number you can call to get assistance. 402-339-4334 and press option 1. This number has information about what tier the area is in, what to do if you’ve been called about an appointment to vaccinate, and other details.

In preparation for your name being called to get vaccinated, the state does offer a website where you can register to be notified when it’s your turn. You can sign up at this link. Keep in mind, tens of thousands of Nebraskans have already registered so they have a long list to work through and review. Still, it’s better to register now and wait, than wait to get registered.

Legislative Update

Good morning, Nebraska!

As has been the norm this session, the week was a busy one.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Speaker Hilgers decided to change how we do things this year. At least for the foreseeable future, the hearings are all-day, starting at 9:30 am, with a break at noon and then returning to hearings at 1:30 pm.

We kicked the week off with LB265 on Tuesday in front of the Urban Affairs committee. This bill is looking to create an exception for Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Act reports. Currently, cities and municipalities that don’t take advantage of PACE must send in a letter that states they aren’t doing so. My bill would simply amend the language so they no longer need to send in the letter if they aren’t participating. This will save both city governments and legislative staff previously wasted time. It’s another way we can remove unnecessary red tape.

On Friday, I had two hearings in front of the Judiciary committee for LB7 and in front of the Government Committee for LB11. LB7 makes sure that a victim of sex trafficking is protected from arrest if they are reporting a violent crime to law enforcement. It encourages cooperation with law enforcement by writing into state law what is already practiced by most agencies in order to foster that cooperation. LB11 creates a more uniform and accessible system for early voting, while still maintaining the safety and security of Nebraska’s election systems. It allows registered voters in Nebraska to request to be put on a list that says they always want to receive an early ballot. They can also request an early ballot from the Secretary of State’s office.

Next week, I have one bill hearing, on Tuesday, February 9, again in front of the Urban Affairs committee. LB9 would change annexation requirements and property tax special valuation provisions for cities that might encompass or be built near a military installation. The way state law is currently written, annexation has to include contiguous or adjacent land, but that’s impossible for cities like Bellevue which have federally owned or NRD land in the middle of a potential annexation area. This would allow those cities to “cross” over NRD or Federal land. The special valuation provisions make it so landowners who are being annexed in aren’t “punished” by the annexation.

A reminder that if you want to participate in any of the hearings on my bills, there have been some changes to the way they are carried out this year. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. His office set up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website. 

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before and they must be submitted to specially designated committee emails, rather than the clerk or the chairperson directly. 

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.

Redistricing
I am honored to be named to the Nebraska Legislature’s redistricing committee this year. Drawing the districts in our state is an incredibly important task that we must undertake every 10 years. Unfortunately, the pandemic has affected exactly when we’re going to get the data and start this important work, just as it’s affected everything else.For those who would like to learn more about how this works and why we’re not getting the census data until later in the year, I found this article from the AP quite useful.
Alums Headed to the Super Bowl
In case you missed it, Bellevue Public Schools has not one, but two alumni heading to the Super Bowl this weekend. Bellevue East High School alumna Miranda Serna and Bellvue West graduate Erin McMaster are both members of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers cheer squad.You can read more about their story in the Omaha World-Herald but I wanted to give these two hard-working young women a bit of a shout out as they proudly represent their home town on the biggest stage in the sporting world this weekend.


COVID-19 Vaccine Update
The Sarpy/Cass County Health Department issued an update on the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine. The department has officially entered into Phase 1B where members of the public will begin getting vaccinated.

As is the case everywhere in the state at this point, the health department has started vaccinating the elderly first and is currently working on getting those who are 80 and over, covered. They will then move to 75 and over, then 70 and over, 65 and over and then onto other popular groups. However, they will start vaccinating those who are 18 and over, if they have significant underlying health issues that would make them “high-risk” should they become infected. People such as teachers and child care providers are also expected to be vaccinated during this phase, which will likely run until mid-March.

In preparation for your name being called to get vaccinated, the state does offer a website where you can register to be notified when it’s your turn. You can sign up at this link. Keep in mind, tens of thousands of Nebraskans have already registered so they have a long list to work through and review. Still, it’s better to register now and wait, than wait to get registered.

Legislative UpdateGood morning, Nebraska!
This week was the first week of committee hearings, and it was quite the busy week, with six of my bills and resolutions scheduled.  Typically, we would have debate in the legislative chambers in the morning and committee hearings in the afternoon. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Speaker Hilgers decided to change how we do things this year. At least for the foreseeable future, the hearings are all-day, starting at 9:30 am, with a break at noon and then returning to hearings at 1:30 pm.On Wednesday, the Government Military and Veteran’s Affairs Committee’s morning session kicked off with my LR1. This resolution lays out the benefits of having the US Space Command brought back to Offutt Air Force Base and makes an official request of the Biden administration to take those benefits into account when choosing a new home starting in 2023. Since introduction, all 48 other senators signed on, an unprecedented sign of bipartisanship in this legislature. Right after the hearing the committee advanced it to the floor and it’s already been adopted, and is well on its way to the President and Vice President of the United States, Nebraska’s congressional delegation in Washington, the Secretary of the Air Force, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, and the Secretary of Defense to help make our case for why Offutt should once again become the home of US Space Command.
Also, on Wednesday morning, the Health and Human Services Committee held hearings on both LB476, and LB14LB476 uses Nebraska’s existing Stroke System of Care program as a foundation to establish and implement an improvement plan for a more comprehensive system for stroke response and treatment. The bill also requires DHHS to collaborate with the task force to maintain a statewide stroke data registry using the ‘Get with the Guidelines’ stroke data set provided by the American Heart Association. Having this data available for our health professionals and research community will prove to be an invaluable tool in helping to save lives and prevent strokes here in Nebraska.LB14 is my Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist interstate compact, which I plan to make my priority bill this year.  This bill will create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals, including military spouses and family members. Six states have currently enacted this compact, and at least another six are considering it. The compact goes into effect when 10 states join. As you know, I have had several other bills passed for compacts for things like psychology, physical therapists, and others. The compacts have more flexibility than just reciprocity because the licensed person will not only be able to practice here in Nebraska but other states in the compact as well. It also creates exceptional consumer protections as part of the compact. These compacts are supported by the Military Families Office at the Pentagon and I’m proud to continue to bring these forward.

On Thursday, we went back in front of the Health and Human Services Committee one more time for a hearing on another compact bill, LB15. This legislation adopts the Occupational Therapy Interstate Compact, which, like the Audiologist compact will create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. This compact was just sent to states in November so Nebraska could be among the first to adopt.

Finally, on Friday, we had two bills in front of the Revenue Committee. The first was LB6, which better clarifies the military retirement bill, LB153. The mechanism originally used was based on 1099’s received from the Department of Defense. There are military retirees that do not receive form 1099 from the US DOD but receive it from The Office of Personnel Management. They are being told they’re not eligible under 153 and LB6 would make them eligible for the benefits under the recently revised Nebraska Statutes, ensuring all are included. 

Directly after that bill was LB10 which makes it so that “disabled veteran” when referred to in Nebraska State Statute has the same meaning as is used at the federal level in 5 U.S.C. 2108: “A disabled veteran means an individual who has served on active duty in the armed forces, (except as provided under section 2108a ) has been separated therefrom under honorable conditions, and has established the present existence of a service-connected disability or is receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or pension because of a public statute administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or a military department.”

Current Nebraska statutes require amputation in order to qualify as a disabled veteran. This new definition will remove confusion when comparing state and federal definitions, and bring more equitable opportunities for our Veterans with disabilities.

Next week, we have another full slate of hearings, starting with LB265 on Tuesday, February 2. This bill is looking to create an exception for Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Act reports. Currently, cities and municipalities that don’t take advantage of PACE must send in a letter that state’s they aren’t doing so. My bill would simply amend the language so they no longer need to send in the letter if they aren’t participating. This will save both city governments and legislative staff previously wasted time. It’s another way we can remove unnecessary red tape.

On Friday, February 5, I’ll appear in front of the Judiciary committee for LB7 and in front of the Government Committee for LB11. LB7 makes sure that a victim of sex trafficking is protected from arrest if they are reporting a violent crime to law enforcement. It encourages cooperation with law enforcement by writing into state law what is already practiced by most agencies in order to foster that cooperation. LB11 creates a more uniform and accessible system for early voting, while still maintaining the safety and security of Nebraska’s election systems. It allows registered voters in Nebraska to request to be put on a list that says they always want to receive an early ballot. They can also request an early ballot from the Secretary of State’s office.

A reminder that if you want to participate in any of the hearings on my bills, there have been some changes to the way they are carried out this year. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. His office set up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website. 

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before and they must be submitted to specially designated committee emails, rather than the clerk or the chairperson directly. 

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.


Meet Bill
Team Blood got a new addition this week. Bill is of course a busy little beaver. I encourage you to check-in on my social media early and often to see what Bill is up to. Like me, he’s always working for the people of District 3!

Step Up To Lead
I’ve talked often in the past about how people in my community can step up and lead even if they aren’t in an elected office. One example of doing that is our citizens joining the many boards and commissions the state has. These are all Governor appointed and there are literally dozens of openings he’s currently looking to fill.

There are so many that are looking for people to step up and help our communities that there’s almost sure to be a board or commission that is of interest to you. While some of the positions are highly specialized, there are also plenty that are just looking for people that want to get involved on an issue.

You can view what boards are available, as well as find out the process for submitting your application on the Governor’s website here.


COVID-19 Vaccine Update
On Thursday, the Sarpy/Cass County Health Department issued an update on the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine. Starting next week, they will enter into Phase 1B where members of the public will begin getting vaccinated.

As is the case everywhere in the state at this point, the health department will start vaccinating the elderly first, with people 65 and older being the first cutoff. However, they will start vaccinating those who are 18 and over, if they have significant underlying health issues that would make them “high-risk” should they become infected. People such as teachers, and child care providers are also expected to be vaccinated during this next phase, which will likely run until mid-March.

In preparation for your name being called to get vaccinated, the department does offer a website where you can register to be notified when it’s your turn. You can sign up at this link. Keep in mind, they’ve already had 20,000 people register, so they have a long list to work through and review. Still, it’s better to register now and wait, than wait to get registered.

Hello, Nebraska!
Next week is the first week of committee hearings, and we’re doing things a bit differently this year. Typically, we would have debate in the legislative chambers in the morning and committee hearings in the afternoon. 

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Speaker Hilgers decided to change how we do things this year. At least for the foreseeable future, the hearings will be all day, starting at 9:30 am. There will be a break from noon to 1:30 pm and then hearings will recommence in the afternoon.

On that note, several of my bills have already been scheduled for hearings next week. 

On Wednesday, the Government Military and Veteran’s Affairs Committee’s morning session kicks off with my LR1. This resolution lays out the benefits of having the US Space Command brought back to Offutt Air Force Base and makes an official request of the Biden administration to take those benefits into account when choosing a new home starting in 2023. When I introduced this resolution, 47 other senators cosigned, a nearly totally unprecedented level of support for something like this.

Also, on Wednesday morning, the Health and Human Services Committee is holding a hearing on LB476. The bill will use Nebraska’s existing Stroke System of Care as a foundation to establish and implement an improvement plan for a more comprehensive system for stroke response and treatment. The bill also requires DHHS to collaborate with the task force to maintain a statewide stroke data registry using the ‘Get with the Guidelines’ stroke data set provided by the American Heart Association. Having this data available for our health professionals and research community will prove to be an invaluable tool in helping to save lives and prevent strokes here in Nebraska.

Wednesday will be a busy day, as LB14, my Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist interstate compact will be heard starting at 1:30 in front of the Health and Human Services Committee. This bill will create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals, including military spouses and family members. Six states have currently enacted this compact, and at least another six are considering it. The compact goes into effect when 10 states join. As you know, I have had several other bills passed for compacts for things like psychology, physical therapists and others. The compacts have more flexibility than just reciprocity because the licensed person will not only be able to practice here in Nebraska but other states in the compact as well. It also creates exceptional consumer protections as part of the compact. These compacts are supported by the Military Families Office at the Pentagon and I’m proud to continue to bring these forward.

On Thursday, we’re back in front of the Health and Human Services Committee one more time for a hearing on another compact bill, LB15. This legislation adopts the Occupational Therapy Interstate Compact, which, like the Audiologist compact will create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. This compact was just sent to states in November so Nebraska could be among the first to adopt.

Finally, on Friday, I will have two bills in front of the Revenue Committee. The first is LB6, which better clarifies the military retirement bill, LB153. The mechanism used was based on 1099’s received from the Department of Defense. There are military retirees that do not receive form 1099 from the US DOD but receive it from The Office of Personnel Management. They are being told they’re not eligible under 153 and LB6 would make them eligible for the benefits under the recently revised Nebraska Statutes, ensuring all are included. 

Directly after that bill will be LB10 which makes it so that “disabled veteran” when referred to in Nebraska State Statute has the same meaning as is used at the federal level as in 5 U.S.C. 2108: “A disabled veteran means an individual who has served on active duty in the armed forces, (except as provided under section 2108a ) has been separated therefrom under honorable conditions, and has established the present existence of a service-connected disability or is receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or pension because of a public statute administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or a military department.”

Current Nebraska statutes require amputation in order to qualify as a disabled veteran. This new definition will remove confusion when comparing state and federal definitions, and bring  more equitable opportunities for our Veterans with disabilities.

There have been some changes to the way hearings are carried out as well. Because of the pandemic, Speaker Hilgers would prefer not to pack the room with testifiers but understands it’s a fundamental right to participate in the legislative hearings in Nebraska. To that end, only those who intend to testify on a bill will be allowed to sit in the hearing room. The Speaker also said his office is setting up a system that will allow users to track the hearing online and enter comments on any bill being heard on the Legislature’s website. He hopes to have this ready for the first hearings of the year on Monday, the 25th.

As always the committees are also accepting letters of support or opposition in lieu of testimony. Because of the added stressors that come from all-day hearings, those letters must now be submitted by noon the day before to be made part of the official record. Last year, the letters were needed by 5 pm the day before, so there is a smaller window of time this time around.

In order to see exactly how you can participate in legislative hearings this year, you can go to this link.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.


State of the Judiciary

On Thursday, the Nebraska Supreme Court’s Chief Justice came to the Legislature to give his State of the Judiciary address. A great deal of his speech focused on the changes that had to be made in the way the courts carried out business over the last year.

Chief Justice Heavican talked about the technological adjustments they had to make to procedures because of the pandemic. He was quite proud, and so am I, that the courts remained open and adapted quickly to their new reality. He made clear that those who needed to avail themselves of the court system could do so.


Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.
Monday was Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and I just wanted to take a moment to pay tribute to one of this country’s great leaders. Among the many other accomplishments he had, he showed that someone could be a leader, even if they aren’t an elected official. I’d encourage every single man, woman, and child in my district to embody that spirit.

The one thing that has become clear to me, especially the way the world is right now, is that we have many people struggling in silence. People who rarely ask for help but will take it when offered. You can be that helping hand, you can be that person that helps remove what they may feel is an insurmountable hurdle.


Coronavirus Vaccine Signup
The website for Sarpy and Cass County Vaccine Signup actually went live last week, but I neglected to include it in my newsletter, so I’m pointing it out this week. At the moment, people who sign up on this website should be 65 or above.

To be clear, the vaccines are not being made available to the general public just yet, but various counties around the state are starting to get ready for when they will be, by offering websites like this. You can enter your contact information and they will contact you when it’s time to distribute the vaccine to more people.

Good morning, Nebraska! This past week marked the first full week of the legislative session. As always, the beginning of the session is spent on introducing new bills. Senators are able to introduce legislation during the first 10 days of the session only. This year, I introduced most of my bills on the first day, though I did drop three more bills this week and will introduce one more next week.

LB265 is a bill that will change provisions of the Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Act. As of now, a city that does not take part in this program is required to write a letter to the Nebraska Legislature, stating that they are not using the program. My bill simply removes that step as it’s a waste of time for the city administrators and senators to create and receive such a letter. This bill does not change any other part of the PACE program.

LB476  will use Nebraska’s existing stroke system of care task force as a foundation to establish and implement an improvement plan for a more comprehensive stroke system for stroke response and treatment and also maintain a statewide stroke data registry using the ‘Get with the Guidelines’ stroke data set provided by the American Heart Association.

LB478 changes how pension and retirement benefits are offered to firefighters in first-class cities. This is a change that has been needed for years but hasn’t been able to be accomplished yet. It’s an uphill battle but a fight I’m willing to have for these men and women who should have peace of mind when they end a career protecting others.

Next week, I’ll be introducing another compact bill, this time that covers licensed counselors. We’d be the first in the country to adopt the compact if the bill passed, and it offers the same kinds of benefits and removes the same hurdles that my other compact bills do.

In addition to the bills I introduced myself, I’ve also cosponsored additional legislation. That includes LB290 from Senator Machaela Cavanaugh that would adopt the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act, and LB261 from Senator Linehan that makes adjustments to how military grave markers are distributed.  Currently in order to get this special grave marker, the deceased has to have served as an active-duty soldier during a time of war. I support Senator Linehan’s bill because it would take away the requirement to serve during a war, as well as include reserves and the National Guard, as long as they served in the guard after 1973. As we know, our National Guard is often Nebraska’s first defense in times of floods, fires, riots and more. They often put their lives on the line on our behalf right here at home.

For a full list and additional information about all the bills I’ve introduced and cosponsored, you can click the link here.

Governor’s State of the State
On Thursday, Governor Ricketts came to the legislature to deliver his annual State of the State Address. The governor talked about several different topics, including the way this state has dealt with the pandemic and I agree with him that when it comes to doing what has to be done, the state has been mostly united in fighting the virus and trying to flatten the curve.

He and I agree that the fight isn’t over, even with vaccines starting to get distributed. Please don’t relax yet. Make sure you’re protecting others and we’ll get through this together.

Legislatively, the governor, Senator Sanders and I are teaming up on a bill that attempts to help military spouses who were teachers in other states and move here, obtain their license more quickly. This bill is similar to measures I’d already worked out with the Department of Education a few years ago, but it puts the measure into state statute rather than an agency rule and goes just a little further in cutting more red tape in this area.

Hearing Schedule Update
On Friday morning, Speaker Hilgers announced there is going to be a change to the way the Legislature carries out its committee hearings. Normally, at the beginning of the session, the day is usually split between floor debate in the morning and hearings in the afternoon.

This year. starting the week of January 25, committee hearings will start in the morning and run all day. The speaker is still working on the policies on how these hearings will be carried out and how testifying will work, in regards to making sure everyone has their voice heard while still being careful about keeping everyone as safe as possible in regards to COVID-19. He has promised to provide more details next week and in turn, I will share those details with you.

If you believe you’re interested in testifying or sending a letter in support or opposition to a bill this year, make sure to keep an eye on this as when hearings start and end may not be the only procedure that changes this year.

Law Enforcement Appreciation Day
Sunday, January 9th was Law Enforcement Appreciation day and night and I just wanted to take a moment to once again express my gratitude and appreciation for the men and women who put their lives on the line all over the country in order to protect us. After the events of the last few weeks, it seems especially important to point out the great service they provide.

I’m also privileged to represent District 3 and Sarpy County. It truly has the most well-trained & collaborative officers around, who continue to keep us safe. They are absolutely the best of the best.

Bellevue Food Pantry Hours Expanded
As we enter the new year, the Bellevue Food Pantry has expanded the hours in which it will distribute food. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, food distribution will take place from 9 am to noon and then from 1 pm to 4 pm. On Wednesdays, distribution will be the same in the morning but will last until 7 pm.

The expanded hours include distribution from 9 am to noon on the first and third Saturdays of the month. As this Saturday is indeed the third Saturday of the month, they will begin those expanded hours.

In order to receive a food pantry, all you need to do is prove you’re a resident of Bellevue with a current ID and proof of address

Good morning, Nebraska! Wednesday was the first day of the 2021 Legislative Session. I wanted to share the bills we will be working on this year from district 3.

LB5Purple Star Program
It encourages but doesn’t require every school in the state to appoint a “military liaison” who will then create programming for students who might be recent transfers into the school district after moving here with their military family. The liaison may also set up a website that demonstrates how to establish a “military-friendly” atmosphere at the school. Choosing to participate in the programming would then designate the school as a “Purple Star” school.

LB6: Military Retirement Tweak
Changes provisions relating to the taxation of military retirement benefits. This is a bit of a tweak from last year’s military retirement bill, LB153. However, that bill was based on 1099’s received from the DOD. There are military retirees that do not receive form 1099 from the US DOD but receive it from The Office of Personnel Management. They are being told they’re not eligible under 153 and LB6 would make them eligible for the benefits under last year’s bill.

LB7: Sex Trafficking Good Samaritan Law
This bill makes sure that a victim of sex trafficking is protected from arrest if they are reporting a violent crime to law enforcement. It encourages cooperation with law enforcement by writing into state law what is already practiced by most agencies in order to foster that cooperation.

LB8: Electioneering
There are gaps in Nebraska’s current statute that enable “dark money” special interest groups to place influential ads that may sway voters during elections without knowing who is behind them. This would seek to fill in those gaps by requiring anyone who makes an advertisement or other kind of “electioneering communication” that costs more than $1,000 to file a form offering specific information with the election commission.

LB9: Annexation
This changes annexation requirements and property tax special valuation provisions for cities that might encompass or be built near a military installation. The way state law is currently written, annexation has to include contiguous or adjacent land, but that’s impossible for cities like Bellevue which have federally owned or NRD land in the middle of a potential annexation area. This would allow those cities to “cross” over NRD or Federal land. The special valuation provisions make it so landowners who are being annexed in aren’t “punished” by the annexation.

LB10: Definition of Disabled Veteran
This Changes motor vehicle and property tax exemptions for disabled veterans by changing the definition to exactly match the federal definition under 5 U.S.C. 2108. It no longer requires an amputation, allows more disabled veterans to take advantage of services, and removes confusion caused by clashing state and federal definitions.

LB11: Early Voting Bill
This creates a more uniform and accessible system for early voting, while still maintaining the safety and security of Nebraska’s election systems. It allows registered voters in Nebraska to request to be put on a list that says they always want to receive an early ballot. They can also request an early ballot from the Secretary of State’s office.

LB12: Commuter Rail
This bill would task the Department of Transportation to study the effectiveness, cost, and need for a commuter rail line between Lincoln and Omaha. It would then submit a report on the study to the legislature.

LB13: Protection Order Statute Change
This bill addresses protection orders from another state when that protection order relates to domestic or family abuse. Currently, certain prohibitions are already in place for Nebraska but we want to harmonize the language to include orders that might be issued in other states and jurisdictions as there have been examples where these individuals have fallen through the cracks.

LB14: Speech Language Pathologist And Audiologist Compact
Adopts the Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact in order to create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. Currently, there are six states that have enacted this compact and at least another six that are considering it. The compact goes into effect when 10 states join.

LB15: Occupational Therapy Compact
Adopts the Occupational Therapy Interstate Compact, which like the Audiologist compact will create better access for patients, offer telehealth alternatives, and remove hurdles for employment for professionals including military spouses and family members. This compact was just sent to states in November so Nebraska could be the first, or among the first to adopt.

LB20: Birth Control Bill
This will reduce interruptions in birth control, helping to reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion in Nebraska by having public and private insurers cover the quantity of contraceptives dispensed in accordance with the prescription—up to 12 months of contraceptives at a time but it won’t require a 12-month supply on the first pickup under private insurance, allowing an initial 3-month prescription to make sure it is safe for that consumer to use prior to expanding it. The intent is to close health inequities in rural Nebraska, those reliant on public transportation, and women who must travel for work or abroad.

This list does not include the many bills I’m also planning on cosponsoring this legislative session.

New License Plates
Starting on January 1, the DMV issued several new license plate designs for Nebraska service members and veterans, as well as options for the public to show support and help fund veteran-related programs. Many are plates that were requested by area Veterans/Veteran’s Organizations in my district and across the state.

 

I

I was not a huge fan of the “Support Our Troops” plate design the DMV picked out for the plate. But t is an opportunity to show your support for the brave men and women in our armed forces. The funds also go to a very good cause as they will be used for a Veteran’s Employment Program here in Nebraska.

New Military Campaign plates will be available for recipients of:

  • Afghanistan Campaign Medal
  • Global War on Terror Expeditionary Medal
  • Iraq Campaign Medal
  • Southwest Asia Service Medal
  • Vietnam Service Medal

Alphanumeric service medal plates are $5 a piece and $40 for ones with a personalized message.

The Support Our Troops plates are $5 for the alphanumeric plates and $70 for those with a custom message.

Back To School
Both Bellevue and Papillion-LaVista schools went back into session this past week after the longer than usual winter break. Both school districts are still offering options to attend class in person for students or to attend class remotely if families don’t feel as though it’s safe to be among big crowds during the pandemic.

You can read the more in-depth Return to School plans for Bellevue on the school’s website and the plan for Papillion-LaVista on theirs if you have any questions or concerns about their approach moving forward. With five more months to go in this school year and vaccines on the way, it’s my great hope that there will be no more disruptions to our children’s education and that we can return to business as usual next fall.

Your Legislative Update

The 2020 Legislative session is over and the interim has officially begun. I fully expect to be back in January to serve alongside a new class of State Senators and I want to wish everyone who saw their terms come to an end last week, good luck in whatever they choose to do moving forward. It was certainly a challenging session, considering it was split into two separate sections, with a long layoff due to the pandemic. While the session was a challenge, I still consider it a success. The Unicameral passed good legislation and so did I, despite the fact that the governor vetoed quite a bit of what passed in the last week of the session.

At the top of the list was my priority bill, LB755. Originally, this bill would give those who cannot get to a barbershop or hair salon the ability to have a barber come to them. While it still contains that provision, I encouraged the Health and Human Services Committee to add important bills from their committee to my bill as a way to show bi-partisan support for all involved. The bill will accomplish many positive things for Nebraskans.

LB755 removes restrictions that are currently placed on Physician Assistants and will make it easier for them to help their patients while still adhering to rules, regulations, and laws of the medical profession and Nebraska. It will also allow PA’s to work with podiatrists for the first time.

As amended, 755 will add spinal muscular atrophy to the list of diseases that will be screened for in infants, and will make sure that pharmacists include specific information regarding patients with Parkinson’s disease in their semi-annual report to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

The bill also allows architecture candidates to begin taking their examination in conjunction with completing educational and experience requirements. It will allow engineers to take one of two examinations prior to completing four years of post-accredited degree experience, and includes other beneficial changes in the way architects are handled in Nebraska.

Finally, I amended one of my bills to this package. LB752 began as a Veterans’ Bill of Rights, but after many discussions with stakeholders, including the Nebraska Department of Veterans Affairs, we pared it down. What we were able to accomplish was the addition of the “Ask the Question” part in the original B.O.R..  This allows service providers in various state agencies the potential to have a profound impact on service members, veterans, and their families, by connecting them to care and services. Service providers will ask the simple question: “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” That question should be included on intake forms and interviews where appropriate, including, but not limited to, hospitals, mental health care centers, senior centers, employment offices, courts, and schools and in encounters with law enforcement. This bill was one of the yearly requests made by the DoD Military Community and Family Policy Office. District 3 works closely with this organization to help keep Nebraska a great place for our military veterans and their families to live and work.

In its final week of the year, the legislature also passed a very important piece of legislation that I believe will go a long way towards helping Nebraskans in a variety of ways. LB1107, introduced as a Speaker’s Major Proposal, it touches on various economic factors, including property tax relief for both rural and urban parts of the state.

1107 is the kind of bipartisan legislation the Unicameral is known for being able to produce. It is not perfect, but it will allow for some relief for property taxes, while also helping the state as it attempts to climb out of the economic hardships imposed on it by the coronavirus pandemic. There are also several incentives for the business community. The hope is that this will further entice companies to come to Nebraska and set up shop, further boosting an economy I think could turn around quickly thanks to this bill.

The Governor spoke about the bill during his Sine Die address and pointed out 1107 will be teamed with the existing $275 million a year tax credit program, for a total of $650 million in state funds that will help defray the cost of property taxes in the state. That is a four-fold increase in property tax relief since he took office.

Legislative Updates for the Remainder of 2020

As the session is over, we will not do a weekly update, we will still do updates throughout the interim on a monthly basis, or to give important information.

Another Successful Food Drive

We had yet another successful food drive at the Bellevue Farmers’ Market last Saturday. This time our collected fresh fruits and vegetables went to the Intercultural Senior Center. The Center provides food services and resources for aging Nebraskans in parts of Douglas & Sarpy Counties.

Since March, our office has worked closely with this organization to provide weekly food pantry deliveries and hot meals to area senior citizens in need. ICS serves those over the age of 50 by providing fresh fruits and vegetables. Donations received, compliments of all who donated, are greatly appreciated and we were happy to help another area non-profit.

The Bellevue Farmer’s Market has been key in helping area non-profits with food drives. This drive is the third of the season; each has been a success thanks to all who have contributed.

Stand and Be Counted

Over the last few months, the United States government has been counting citizens for the census, and we are coming closer to a very important date – the date the government will begin sending census takers door-to-door in order to get information from homes that have yet to submit their information.

If you received a census form and have yet to return it, make sure to do so soon!  You are also able to submit the information online at the official census bureau website at 2020census.gov. It only takes a few minutes, and is vitally important to our country. To insure you and your community are being accurately represented we ALL must do our part and be counted. UPDATE: The Census Bureau announced plans to officially stop counting on September 30, a month sooner than previously announced, and includes all forms of data collections. Please hurry with your responses so Nebraska can be adequately counted!

Early Voting Applications Arriving NOW!

The Sarpy County Election Commission began sending out vote by mail applications on August 3.  Anyone wishing to receive a vote by mail ballot should complete and return that application by October 23. The election commission has offered several different ways you can return applications, including scanning or emailing a photo of the completed application to earlyvote@sarpy.com. Additionally, there are four-drop boxes available where you can deposit completed applications.  For more information, contact election commission staff at 402-593-2167. Voters returning applications to the election commission can expect ballots to arrive beginning on September 28. UPDATE: The Secretary of State announced that applications will be sent to all registered, eligible voters in the state.

Sen. Carol Blood

District 3
Room 1021
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
(402) 471-2627
Email: cblood@leg.ne.gov
Search Senator Page:
Topics
Archives
Committee Assignments
    Business and Labor
    Government
    Military and Veterans Affairs
    Urban Affairs
    Redistricting
Search Current Bills
Search Laws
Live Video Streaming
Find Your Senator