NEBRASKA LEGISLATURE

The official site of the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature

Sen. Sue Crawford

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45

The content of these pages is developed and maintained by, and is the sole responsibility of, the individual senator's office and may not reflect the views of the Nebraska Legislature. Questions and comments about the content should be directed to the senator's office at scrawford@leg.ne.gov

Welcome
January 9th, 2019

Thank you for visiting my website. It is an honor to represent the people of the 45th legislative district in the Nebraska Unicameral Legislature.

You’ll find my contact information on the right side of this page, as well as a list of the bills I’ve introduced this session and the committees on which I serve. Please feel free to contact me and my staff about proposed legislation or any other issues you would like to address.

Sincerely,
Sen. Sue Crawford

Parts of Bellevue were among the wide swathes of the state hit by devastating flooding in the last week. Thanks to the quick actions of impacted residents and first responders, there were no deaths reported in Bellevue. We mourn for those who have lost their lives across our state and in Iowa.

This update is to share information about short-term emergency assistance available, options to volunteer and donate in our community, and information about long-term recovery efforts. Please share this information with anyone you know who may find it useful.

Emergency Assistance Contacts

My office has been in contact with the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) to get more information about recovery efforts going forward and see what we could do to help. In the near term, there are a number of resources you can contact to find assistance:

  • NEMA recommends that all individuals and businesses affected by the floods call 211 for assistance. That is the central information point for all emergency assistance at this time, and they will be able to direct you to local relief options. If you have difficulty reaching 211 or if you are not in Nebraska, dial 866-813-1731.
  • NEMA also has a hotline for questions about flood recovery efforts at 402-817-1551.
  • For information on debris cleanup, you can contact the Crisis Cleanup Hotline at 402-556-2476.
  • Affected farmers should contact their local USDA Farm Service Agency here; for Douglas and Sarpy Counties, that number is 402-896-0121.

Donations and Volunteering

As of Wednesday afternoon I understand that Bellevue Christian Church is the main collection and distribution site for relief donations. If you want to help our community with donations of time or money, the Bellevue First organization has created a map of local shelters, donation centers, and meal services. You can find that map here. That map is being continually updated, but I recommend you call ahead to make sure that the organization is open and accepting donations. Various organizations may also be in need of different items or kinds of assistance, so if you call they can direct you to what they need most. The Journal Star has also collected a list of statewide assistance and recovery organizations that are accepting donations here.

Long-term Recovery Efforts

I have also received a number of questions about whether the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be offering assistance. My office spoke to NEMA to learn more. What we were told is that if the federal government declares a general disaster for the state, FEMA must also issue an Individual Assistance Declaration before federal direct assistance can be provided to individuals. There are a series of requirements that must be met before FEMA will issue such a declaration and it can be a lengthy process. At this point I do not know if an Individual Assistance Declaration will be issued for our flooding disaster, but I do know a representative of FEMA was in the state this week to work with NEMA on an expedited declaration request to submit to the White House. Governor Ricketts’ tour of the flood zone with Vice President Pence provided a direct conduit to get information about the damage to the President, and our federal congressional delegation has been united in advocating for assistance and making sure FEMA is fully informed about our state’s suffering.

The NEMA representative my office spoke to said that a state Long-Term Recovery Group of businesses, non-profits, and government entities are often the ones providing the most direct rebuilding relief after emergencies. The 211 network will also be involved in referring individuals to those long-term recovery efforts once they are organized. I therefore encourage everyone who is affected by these floods to contact 211 for the most up-to-date list of available assistance.

These floods have caused untold damage and suffering, and I will do all I can to assist in the recovery efforts. Bellevue, Sarpy, and the state of Nebraska are full of strong and resilient people. We also have untold numbers of people who have given so much of themselves to help others. Recovery will not be easy, and it is up to all of us to put our best efforts toward rebuilding our communities and supporting our neighbors.

All the best,

Bills on the Agenda

Sometimes we get funny reminders that our shorthand and jargon in the Legislature can be confusing when you don’t spend every day immersed in it. A caller to my office recently asked to speak with me, at which my staff said I was unavailable as I was on the floor. After a pause, the caller asked my staff, “…. should you go help her, then?” Of course, I was not laying on the ground – being “on the floor” means spending time up in the George W Norris Legislative Chamber for debate. It was a good reminder, though, that all the acronyms and idioms that get tossed around at the capitol often need a bit more explaining!

One of the bills we advanced on the floor this week is LB 217, introduced by Senator Patty Pansing Brooks. The bill makes it clear that employers cannot fire or otherwise retaliate against an employee for discussing their own wages to determine if pay discrimination is taking place. This bill is an important step to limit gender discrimination in the workplace, since we know that one of the most pernicious factors keeping women from achieving equal pay is that they often do not know what they are making relative to their co-workers and therefore have little negotiating leverage. This bill absolutely does not require anyone to discuss their pay. It simply gives employees the explicit right to talk about what they’re making and removes the threat of enforced secrecy around the subject.

We also spent time on Friday working through final reading bills. You can see the full agenda of bills that were approved here, but a couple of the highlights include:

LB 284, Senator John McCollister’s Remote Seller and Marketplace Facilitator Act to explicitly legalize collection of online sales tax in Nebraska. LB 284 brings Nebraska in line with the Supreme Court’s decision this summer to allow collection of online sales tax and is an important tool to ensure the state is collecting those taxes that are due.

LB 124, my bill to clarify that municipalities can jointly administer a clean energy assessment district under the Property Assessment Clean Energy Act, or PACE program. This is a “cleanup” bill for legislation that was passed several years back.

LB 160, Senator Dan Quick’s bill to expressly authorize municipalities to use Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act funds for early childhood development infrastructure. We know that limited childcare is one of the barriers to attracting qualified applicants to jobs in Nebraska and that high costs can be a serious burden on families who already live here. LB 160 will provide an important tool to encourage new childcare facilities.

LB 112, Senator Sara Howard’s bill to waive first year licensing fees for occupations under the Uniform Credentialing Act for individuals who are identified as low income, part of a military family, or a person between the ages of 18 and 25. Only the initial fee is waived, and the regular fee would apply for all renewals. This bill will give a boost to those entering a new profession and make the licensing process for these occupations, which is important to protect public safety, less onerous for those just starting out.

PFML Prioritized

Senator Machaela Cavanaugh designated my LB 311, the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act, as her priority bill for this session. I have been working with Senator Cavanaugh on this issue ever since she was elected to the Legislature, and I am grateful that she chose to use her priority designation for this important bill. We expect the bill to be debated next week.

Bill Hearings

This week I had my final two bill hearings for this session, of 22 total bills I introduced. Committees will continue to hold hearings for the next two weeks, ending March 28th.

My first hearing took place Wednesday March 13th in the Government, Military & Veterans Affairs Committee. LB 210 requires the reporting and disclosure of electioneering communications. Electioneering communications are materials targeted at the electorate of a candidate or ballot initiative that are distributed in the 30 days preceding an election. These communications allude to candidates or ballot measures without explicitly recognizing the election, their candidacy, or the official name or number of the ballot initiative, and therefore do not have not have to be reported under current law. LB 210 does not restrict or limit the activity of citizen groups or what can be said in electioneering communications.  Instead, LB 210 simply creates a reporting mechanism to bring more transparency and accountability to our state’s elections. If powerful groups or organizations are pouring money into Nebraska to shape campaigns and elections in our state, the citizens and candidates have a right to know who they are.

The second hearing, for LB 714, was Friday in the Revenue Committee. My intern Lillian took the lead on preparing for this bill and did an excellent job! I served as chair of the Economic Development Task Force last biennium, and we spent significant time discussing the issue of job training and employee retention in Nebraska. This bill functions as a tool for small- and medium-sized businesses to train employees in newly created jobs through agreements with state community colleges. LB714 creates a localized, self-sustaining initiative that offers employees an opportunity to acquire competitive workplace skills, which may include college credit and certifications. The bill focuses on medium- to high-skill jobs and allows companies who have signed an agreement with a college to withhold a portion of the payroll taxes already due to the state and remit that money directly to the community college. This bill incentivizes the creation of higher wage jobs with additional training requirements offering businesses a sustainable foundation on which they can build their employees’ skillsets.

Priority Request Deadlines

We are almost halfway through this 90-day legislative session; Day 45 will be next week on March 20th. We have mostly been debating bills in worksheet order (explained in a previous update here), but have taken up a couple of senator priority bills. Each senator gets to select one bill as his or her priority. Often it will be one of a senator’s own bills, but it’s not uncommon for someone to prioritize a bill introduced by another senator. As the name suggests, these bills get top priority for floor debate over worksheet order bills. Each standing committee also identifies two priority bills. Tuesday March 19th next week is the deadline for both senators and committees to identify and submit their priority bills, but bills can be prioritized as soon as session starts. Senator Wishart, for example, prioritized LB 110 the day after she introduced it in January. Priority bills must still go through the normal committee process before they can be debated on the floor. At this time twelve bills have been given personal priority: we’ve debated three, have two pending for debate next week (including LB 311, my PFML bill), and have seven more that have not been advanced out of committee. Four committee priorities have been designated, of which we have debated one. You can find the full list of personal and committee priority bills here. Having a status of “Referral” means the bill is still in committee.

The Speaker of the Legislature, Senator Jim Scheer, also gets to select 25 priority bills. This Thursday March 14th was the deadline to submit bills for the Speaker to consider as a Speaker priority bill, and he will announce his selections on Wednesday of this coming week. Senators who want a Speaker priority for their bill must send a letter to his office with the reasons it’s a good choice. In previous sessions the Speaker has received far more than 25 requests, so not all of them can be granted. Speaker priority bills have historically been fairly non-controversial and broadly impactful, but the Speaker may choose any bills he likes from among the requests. Speaker priority bills will also be listed on the Legislature’s website (here) once they are announced on Wednesday next week.

I am among the Senators who will make my final decision on priority designation next week. Stay tuned!

Capitol Visitors

This week the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) held Severe Weather Awareness Week, which was marked by a governor’s proclamation and poster contest award ceremony on Monday March 11th. This year the 3rd place poster contest winner was Julia Schuler, a student at Cornerstone Christian School in Bellevue. Congratulations to Julia and all the poster contest winners! They did an excellent job helping to spread information about how to be prepared for all kinds of severe weather.


At the Severe Weather Awareness Week ceremony. L-R: Me, Lynn Marshall (Sarpy County Emergency Manager), Julia Schuler, Bryan Tuma (NEMA Assistant Director), Governor Pete Ricketts, and Suzanne Fortin (National Weather Service). Photo credit: Nebraska Emergency Management Agency

On Wednesday March 13th I got to meet two different groups of 4th graders visiting from LD 45. In the morning Avery Elementary came through…

… and in the afternoon Two Springs Elementary took its tour. Both groups were full of bright learners with bright futures!

Also on Wednesday I attended the Nebraska Business Development Center’s annual awards lunch at the Governor’s residence. It was my pleasure to join Senator John Arch in presenting Hillcrest Health Services with the Employee Development Business of the Year Award. Hillcrest does a great job investing in their employees and helping them develop their skills, and is an important part of our Sarpy community. The award is certainly well-deserved.


At the NBDC lunch with representatives from Hillcrest, the NBDC, and Senator John Arch.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

PFML and Sick & Safe Leave Advance

On Wednesday the Business & Labor Committee voted to advance my LB 311 (Paid Family & Medical Leave Insurance Act) and LB 305 (Sick & Safe Leave) to the full Legislature. I am pleased the majority of the committee saw merit in these two important bills.

Bills Debated This Week

Our agenda this week contained a number of important bills. One that we discussed and advanced to the next round of consideration was LB 284, Senator John McCollister’s bill to explicitly legalize collection of online sales tax in Nebraska.  LB 284, the Remote Seller and Marketplace Facilitator Act, brings Nebraska in line with the Supreme Court’s decision this summer to allow collection of online sales tax and is an important tool to ensure the state is collecting those taxes that are due. LB 284 is Senator McCollister’s priority bill this year.

LB 354 was introduced by Senator Patty Pansing Brooks to update how juvenile court records are treated after completion of court-ordered probation or diversion. The goal is to make sure that poor decisions as a minor do not define that person for the rest of their life. Under current law, juvenile records can be sealed when a minor reaches 17, but it is a confusing process that leads to a high number of records remaining open and accessible to the public beyond the age of 17. LB 354 creates a system to automatically seal the records of youth who successfully complete probation or other court orders as soon as that adjudicated sentence is completed. This bill recognizes that juveniles do make mistakes, and still holds them to a standard that requires them to make amends; but also makes sure those mistakes do not follow our young people into their adult life unnecessarily.

One bill that was debated but not advanced this week was LB 627, Senator Pansing Brooks’ priority bill on LGBTQ discrimination in the workplace. I was in favor of this bill as an important protection for LGBTQ Nebraskans. It also would have been a boon for workforce development, as inclusionary policies are one of the issues young workers overwhelmingly support and seek out in their employers. LB 627 does not appear to have enough support to advance, and will likely not come up for discussion again this year.

Crawford Bill Hearings

This week I had four bill hearings in as many different committees. The first, on Monday in the Education Committee, was LB 120 The bill amends the existing requirement for a one-hour training on suicide prevention and expands the definitions of what can be covered in the training to include a wider array of behavioral and mental health topics that could be relevant to school staff as they interact with our students. Suicide prevention and awareness training will still be required, but the bill gives schools more latitude in terms of what they might cover for a more comprehensive behavioral and mental health discussion, including topics such as early warning signs and symptoms, trauma-informed care, and procedures for linking students and parents to services and supports. LB 120 is the culmination of numerous discussions with school administrators, school psychologists, teachers, and other education personnel. Those discussions led to LB 120 as a tangible, reasonable step to take toward improving school safety and student mental health without creating new mandates for teachers or school staff.

On Tuesday I headed to the Agriculture Committee to introduce LB 304. LB 304 is a “cottage foods” bill that would allow Nebraskans to sell foods already authorized for sale at farmers’ markets to customers from their homes, at certain events, or for order and delivery online or over the phone. This bill only pertains to foods that are not time/temperature controlled for safety, including foods such as baked goods, uncut fruits and vegetables, jams, jellies, and fresh or dried herbs. Hundreds of Nebraska families are already purchasing and safely consuming these locally produced products at farmers’ markets. This legislation simply makes cottage foods available throughout the year and provides access to local foods in communities that do not have farmers’ markets. LB 304 is a common sense bill that reduces barriers for Nebraskans to earn income.

I had two bill hearings on Wednesday. The first was LB 211 in the Government, Military & Veterans Affairs Committee. This bill is about a fundamental Nebraska principle: the value of nonpartisan government. LB 211 provides that all county officers be elected on a nonpartisan ballot, including county clerk, register of deeds, county assessor, sheriff, treasurer, county attorney, public defender, clerk of the district court, and county surveyor. In counties large and small with a dominant political party, the races for many county positions effectively happen in the primary for the dominant party, which leaves out the one in five Nebraskans that are nonpartisan voters and the voters of the minority party. This results in the registered voters of one party selecting the officer that will represent all the residents of the county. Nonpartisan voters pay taxes to fund our county elections just as much as registered partisans do, so I believe we should not deny them the right to participate in elections they’re helping to pay for. LB 211 is in the best interest of voters in our state.

The second Wednesday hearing was LB 613 in the Revenue Committee. I served as Chair of the Economic Development Task Force for the 2017-2018 biennium, and the Task Force’s 2018 report included a recommendation to eliminate the Beginning Farmer Tax Credit, Historic Tax Credit, and New Markets Tax Credit this session. LB 613 reflects that priority by bringing the sunset dates for all three programs forward from December 31, 2022 to July 1, 2019. Money saved would be redirected to the Site and Building Development Fund. I believe it is important to regularly examine our tax credit ecosystem to ensure these programs are meeting their development goals and living up to legislative intent. At the hearing we had a number of testifiers talk about how important these credits are to their communities; I appreciate that they came out to make the case for these programs.


Giving my opening statement on LB 613 to the Revenue Committee

My final two hearings will take place next week, wrapping up committee hearings for all 22 of my bills. Committees will continue to meet and hold hearings through March 28th, and we will begin all-day debate on April 2nd.

Capitol Visitors

Two UNMC students, Daniela Nelson and Sarah Fisher, visited my office on Monday March 4th to talk about their participation in the LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities) program. This program trains future health providers to better understand developmental disabilities and the kind of care that is critical to support patients with those challenges.

A group of Cornerstone Christian School 4th graders visited their capitol on Tuesday March 5th. We talked about how I became a state senator and how they can all be leaders in their school and community.   

On Wednesday March 6th the Brain Injury Alliance of Nebraska (BIANE) hosted Brain Injury Awareness Day at the capitol to talk to senators about the many ways brain injuries can impact Nebraskans. BIANE also held a lunch, which my staff attended. Steve Martin, the former CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield and a survivor of his own brain injury, was the presenter at lunch. He talked about the landscape of brain injury treatment and recovery from both the institutional and patient standpoint, plus the ways Nebraska can do better to support those with brain injuries of all kinds.

Chili Contest Judging

Bellevue’s Boy Scout Troop 305 hosted their 8th annual Chili Cook Off on Saturday March 2nd, and I was honored to be a judge. I have been a regular judge at this annual fundraiser. It is always fun to meet the scouts, parents, and other judges. And it certainly doesn’t hurt that all the chilis we tasted were absolutely delicious!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Hearings this Week 

This week I had three bill hearings in three different committees.

On Wednesday February 27th the Judiciary Committee heard LB 365. This bill creates a centralized registry where Nebraskans can store advance healthcare directives, or instructions containing their wishes for end-of-life medical treatment, where it can be accessed by a medical professional when necessary. The idea for this bill came to us as a result of a conversation with one of my constituents whose niece had a lung condition and was given a short prognosis. The patient’s doctors asked the family what they wanted them to do when the patient’s lungs stopped working if she could not communicate for herself. My constituent wished that there was a centralized way of sharing this kind of information among patients, families, and providers so that providers can adhere to a patient’s wishes for their care when life-threatening situations arise and the patient is unable to communicate those wishes. LB 365 is an additional tool that patients and families could use to communicate with their healthcare providers and to be proactive about making decisions for their own care. Unfortunately in this tough budget year a new initiative like this is unlikely to be adopted.


Introducing LB 365 in the Judiciary Committee, which is meeting in the beautiful Warner Chamber during construction.

Next up was LB 323 on Thursday. Heard in the Health and Human Services Committee, the bill amends eligibility criteria for Nebraska’s Medicaid Insurance for Workers with Disabilities (MIWD) program. This program allows individuals with disabilities to pay a premium for, or “buy-in” to, Medicaid coverage while working and earning an income that puts them over the traditional eligibility threshold. Current eligibility criteria is outdated and prevents persons who should otherwise qualify from participating in the program. This bill is still a work in progress, as we are working with both the Department of Health and Human Services and disability advocates to create an amendment that offers the greatest possible coverage under this program in a fiscally responsible way.

LB 614 had its hearing in the Revenue Committee on Friday March 1st. The bill is aimed at providing property tax relief and strengthening school funding. It provides additional revenue to school districts by eliminating some corporate deductions and tax exclusions, increasing taxes on cigarettes, soft drinks, candy, and bottled water, and ending the tangible personal property tax exemption. Providing relief to school districts will drive local property taxes down. This is one of the many property tax relief proposals that have been introduced this year. The Revenue Committee will meet next week to discuss all of our options and how to combine the best ideas from each bill into one comprehensive tax reform package.

Next week I will have a further four hearings on my bills. Committees will continue to meet and hold hearings until the end of March, and in that time my final two bills will be heard. We will begin all-day debate with the full legislature on April 2nd.

Chaplain of the Day

Pastor Paul Moessner of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Bellevue served as the Legislature’s Chaplain of the Day on Tuesday February 26th. It was a pleasure having Pastor Moessner and his wife Donna with us to share the prayer and see our beautiful capitol!

Bills on the Agenda

This week we worked through a number of bills on the floor. One, LB 399, was a compromise bill to modernize our social studies and civics statutes. The new standards ask students to engage with their government in one of several ways and removes some outdated references to Americanism that have been in place since the 1950s.

Another bill that we advanced is LB 309, which would add an extra judge to the Douglas County District Court. This is an important bill that provides Douglas County, our largest population center and busiest judicial district, with more resources to do their jobs and keep judicial access available and speedy as the constitution requires. Without this bill, there is every possibility that a judicial vacancy out west could be reassigned to Douglas County to fill the need, which no one wants to see happen.

We also came to a compromise on LB 183, Senator Breise’s bill to change how ag land is valued when a school district or higher education institution issues bonds. Current law values ag land at 75% of its assessed value for bond purposes; Senator Breise’s bill as introduced lowered that to 1%, and the Revenue Committee’s amendment raised that to 30%. I and others opposed such a low valuation out of concern that such a change would simply cause the burden to swing disproportionately over to local homeowners and make it much more difficult for school districts to finance their work. After discussion between all parties, it was agreed that a 50% valuation would be an acceptable compromise to bring ag landowners’ potential financial liability down without crippling school bonds or homeowners. LB 183 will only apply to new bonds issued after the bill’s effective date.

Final Reading

On Friday we spent several hours on Final Reading bills. Of the 32 Final Reading bills we passed, two were mine: LB 121 and LB 122. Final Reading is exactly what it sounds like: it is the final time a bill is read in the Legislature, and the last round of voting before bills are presented to the Governor. A bill can’t be amended or debated on Final Reading, but a senator can make a motion to return a bill to Select File for a specific amendment. If that happens and an amendment is adopted, the bill goes back in the line and has to be placed on Final Reading again at a later date.

During Final Reading debate, the Legislature is placed under call. That means all senators who are listed as present must be in their seats in the Chamber, and all non-senators including legislative staff and the media must leave the area where our desks are located. Placing the House under call ensures that senators are in their seats and ready to vote when the time comes. Each bill on Final Reading is actually read aloud, likely as a holdover from the days when senators could not simply pull up the PDF of the bill on a laptop. The first time you hear Final Reading can be rather funny, as the bills are read extremely quickly – it sounds like an auctioneer asking for bids, except the excitement at the end is that a bill passes to the Governor’s desk. Thankfully senators can vote to suspend the rules and dispense with the reading for particularly long bills. After the reading is done, the presiding officer invites the senators to vote on whether the bill should pass. In most cases, a bill must have 25 votes to pass; however, a bill with an emergency clause, meaning it goes into effect sooner than a regular bill, requires 33 votes. A proposed constitutional amendment requires 30 votes to place it on the general election ballot, and 40 to place it on a primary or special election ballot.

Legislative Visitors

The Nebraska State AFL-CIO held its annual legislative day on Monday and Tuesday this week. On February 26th I spent some time talking to the delegates about legislation that impacts working people and their families, including my Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act (LB 311).

On Wednesday February 27th the Urban League of Nebraska and a number of other organizations sponsored the 3rd annual Black & Brown Legislative Day for young people of color. The group spent the morning watching debate and talking to senators, then held a lunch where I joined other senators in talking about the legislation we’re most proud of and how they can have an impact on the policies they care about. It was a wonderful, engaged group of young people and I highly enjoyed getting to speak with them about their goals and plans.


Photo taken by North Omaha Information Support Everyone (NOISE)

Thursday was Nurses’ Day at the Legislature, and I joined them for a lovely lunch where I got to meet some of the nurses who work in LD 45 and around the state. Nursing is a critical part of our healthcare system and I thank them for all that they do!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Legislative Debate

The Unicameral worked through a number of bills on our debate agenda this week. Some of the bills we advanced include:

Senator John McCollister introduced LB 254, the Fair Chance Hiring Act. This act is intended to remove criminal history from having a disqualifying impact if the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position. Under LB 254, employers must give applicants the opportunity to explain any convictions or other criminal history, including the steps they’ve taken to rehab and rejoin society, if the job application includes a question about that history. This bill will provide an avenue for those with a conviction on their record to give employers the full story and make the case for why they would still make excellent employees.

LB 486, introduced by Senator John Lowe, creates the Veteran and Active Duty Supportive Postsecondary Institution Act. The bill creates a mechanism for colleges and universities to be designated “Veteran and Active Duty Supportive” if they meet certain criteria such as having an established military student organization, offering class credit for military training, or hosting a Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program. This is a great bill that will make it more clear to veteran and active duty military members which of the many outstanding institutions in the state might best meet their unique needs. It will also encourage institutions to give additional focus to veteran and military student issues, and will be a tool to recruit out-of-state military and veteran students to come study in Nebraska.

Senator Sara Howard’s LB 112 is another bill that will help servicemember families, as well as low-income individuals and young professionals. The bill waives first year licensing fees for occupations under the Uniform Credentialing Act for individuals who are identified as low income, part of a military family, or a person between the ages of 18 and 25. Only the initial fee is waived, and the regular fee would apply for all renewals. This bill is intended to give a boost to those entering a new profession and make the licensing process for these occupations, which is important to protect public safety, less onerous for those just starting out.

Family Visit at the Legislature

On Friday February 22nd my son Phil (R) and his friend William Hayes (L), who lives in Salina Kansas, visited the Legislature. It was a lot of fun to have them here!

Bill Hearings This Week

After an almost two-week break to catch our collective breaths, this week we had hearings on three of my bills. The first took place on Thursday February 21st. LB 439, which was referred to the Health & Human Services Committee, requires that Medicaid cover up to 24 medically necessary chiropractic treatments per benefit year. My office worked with the Chiropractors Association and with DHHS to come to a tentative agreement to make this change through the rules and regulations process, which means the bill may not ultimately be needed. The public hearing process is still an important avenue to make the case for such coverage, however, and the committee had a good discussion about the health and fiscal benefits of chiropractic care for Medicaid recipients.


Some of the chiropractic doctors and advocates who testified in favor of LB 439

I had two hearings in the Revenue Committee on Friday February 22nd. The first bill, LB 236, allows the Department of Revenue to provide sales tax reports on the Nebraska Advantage Transformational Tourism and Redevelopment Act (NATTRA) to cities who participate in one of their economic development incentive programs in a secure electronic manner. The current law requires that the information can only be accessed if someone from the participating municipality drives to Lincoln and views the information in the Department office. The goal is to make the NATTRA process work more efficiently for both sides.

The second hearing on Friday was for LB 237. This bill restores a 0.5% monthly commission to counties across the state for all motor vehicle sales tax collections over $3,000. This is part of my efforts to address unfunded mandates to counties, and supporting our counties is an important part of the property tax equation.  

Legislative Events & Receptions

One of my favorite parts of being a senator is getting to meet a wide variety of people who care deeply about a whole host of issues. There are many groups that come to the capitol with their members to talk to senators about those issues they hold dear. Sometimes they host breakfasts or receptions, and sometimes people come to the capitol and talk to senators in their offices or in the rotunda during debate. Oftentimes it’s both! I have met with a number of such groups so far this session, representing everyone from professional firefighters to after-school programs to a group of visiting attorneys from Ukraine. There are far too many to name them all here, but I’ve met with a few in the last week or so and took some pictures to share.

On February 14th the Nebraska Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Association held a breakfast at the historic Ferguson House near the capitol. The state association is a network of 21 local programs that recruits and trains volunteers for the CASA program. I met with some Sarpy County CASA volunteers (below) and discussed their vital work on behalf of our local court-involved children.

The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, and American Lung Association sponsored Tobacco Free Day on Thursday February 21st. I talked to a group of great advocates from CHI Health about policies to reduce tobacco use in Nebraska.

In the evening on Thursday I joined The Arc of Nebraska for their annual awards dinner, which is a wonderful celebration of our community members with intellectual and developmental disabilities. I was also surprised and honored to be presented the 2019 Harold Sieck Public Official of the Year Award that evening. The Arc advocates for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families, and their work is made especially strong by the tireless work of those very same individuals on their own behalf. I am proud to have worked with The Arc on LB 323 this year, as well as countless other issues in my time in the legislature.

A group of UNMC Student Delegates visited the capitol on Friday February 22nd. They selected my LB 120, which expands teacher training in mental and behavioral health, as one of their priority bills for this year.

Creighton Student Advocacy

Monday February 18th was Presidents’ Day, and I spent some time in the afternoon visiting with students at Creighton’s Schlegel Center for Service and Justice (SCSJ).

The students organized the gathering as a chance to learn about advocacy and public service. Speaking with the SCSJ’s active and engaged young students is always a wonderful experience.

Boards and Commissions Openings

Scattered among our daily debate agendas in the last few weeks have been a number of Confirmation Reports. In Nebraska, the Governor has the power to appoint leaders for many of the state’s agencies, boards, and commissions. Those organizations may be as large as DHHS or the Department of Education, and as small as the Brand Committee or the Boiler Safety Code Advisory Board. Each time the Governor makes such an appointment or reappointment, the person’s application must be sent to the Legislature to be confirmed. Confirmation hearings are held by the standing committees, and follow the same process as bills: the appointee appears either in person or by phone to answer questions from senators on the committee, after which members of the public are invited to testify in support, opposition, or in a neutral position on the appointment. The committee then votes on whether to send the appointment to the full Legislature, which debates the appointment and then votes on final confirmation. Most appointments are approved with little fuss, as those appointed are generally well-qualified for their roles. Still, it is an opportunity for the Legislature to vet executive appointees and for the public to weigh in on the people who will lead the state agencies and organizations with whom they interact.

Appointing individuals to serve on these boards and commissions is an important way to allow citizens across the state to bring their expertise to bear on policies and decisions made by our state government. I encourage you to consider serving, and to occasionally check the Governor’s webpage to see if there is an opening that is a good fit for you. A list of current vacancies and the application form can be found here.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Celebrating Paul Hartnett

On Wednesday February 13th we celebrated the retirement from public life of former Senator Paul Hartnett, who represented LD 45 for 20 years. He was joined by his daughters Joan Hartnett and Debbie Burchard, plus friends Judy Garlock and Tex Richters. During the morning session I read the text of LR 23, a resolution to congratulate and thank Paul for his life of public service. Then Paul, his family and friends, and some of the many legislative staffers who have worked with Paul over the years headed over to the Parkway Lanes Bowling Alley for lunch (and most importantly, a slice of their superb pie!).


L-R: Joan Hartnett, Tex Richters, Debbie Burchard, Judy Garlock, and Paul Hartnett, with legislative staffers Sally Schultz and Julia Holmquist

Paul has been a tireless advocate for Bellevue in his half-century of public service. We are all grateful for his advocacy and his friendship over the years, and I trust he will enjoy his retirement to the fullest.

Debate and Hearings This Week

This week, and for most weeks going forward, the Legislature was only in session for four days. The intent of our four-day-week-schedule is to allow senators (especially those who live out west) enough time to get home, catch up on work for their other jobs, spend some time with their families, and check in with constituents in the district over the weekend. Many western senators stay in Lincoln during the week rather than try to drive several hours back and forth. Since the Unicameral is a part-time legislature, meeting only four days makes it easier for senators to serve and gives staff a day to catch up without the unpredictability of session.

This week on the floor we talked about several important bills. LB 160, introduced by Senator Dan Quick, would expressly authorize municipalities to use Local Option Municipal Economic Development Act funds for early childhood development infrastructure. We know that limited childcare is one of the barriers to attracting qualified applicants to jobs in Nebraska and that high costs can be a serious burden on families who already live here. LB 160 will provide an important tool to encourage new childcare facilities.

Another bill that drew significant attention and discussion was Senator Tom Briese’s LB 183. The bill would change how ag land is valued when a school district or higher education institution issues bonds, with the purpose of limiting farmers’ and ranchers’ obligations under such bonds. Senator Briese brought this bill as part of the larger discussion around property tax rates – the state government does not collect property taxes but is under significant pressure to help lower them indirectly. Current law values ag land at 75% of its assessed value for bond purposes; Senator Breise’s bill as introduced lowered that to 1%, and the Revenue Committee’s amendment raised that to 30%. I did not support the bill in Committee and have serious concerns that such a low valuation on ag land would simply cause the burden to swing over to local homeowners and make it much more difficult for school districts and colleges to finance their work. After about two hours of debate LB 183 was placed on what’s known as a Speaker’s hold, which simply means it will not be rescheduled for debate until the Speaker feels that enough progress has been made to advance the bill.

Wednesday and Thursday in the Revenue Committee were very long nights, as we heard a series of bills over the two days that are all trying to update our tax system in different ways to reduce the property tax burden on ag producers. On Wednesday we discussed LB 182, which would allow school districts to adopt an optional income surcharge tax to reduce their dependence on property taxes for education purposes. Senator Bolz brought that bill and discussed in the hearing how it had helped to lower property taxes in parts of Iowa that had adopted it. On Thursday we took up LB 314, LB 497 and LB 677. These are three of the most systemic efforts to change revenue sources and reduce property tax rates. However, it is true that each of the various proposals we heard in Revenue Committee may have unintended consequences and increase the burdens on other people, which is an important part of the discussion. We heard from all kinds of testifiers about how the various proposed changes would affect them, both for good or for ill. Since I am new to the Revenue Committee this session I look forward to digging into all these tax bills and the broader implications they may have for individuals and businesses. We will have hearings on other bills this session that attempt to retool our tax code (including my LB 614, which is also a systemic approach to rebalance taxes and school financing). LB 614 does not yet have a hearing scheduled. These will be ongoing discussions and I do not expect the committee to take immediate action on any one bill.

Lincoln’s Birthday Ceremonies

The 210th anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln, born February 12, 1809, was Tuesday. On that day we began the session with a special Presentation of Colors ceremony by the Nebraska Department of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. The group also posted an honor guard that day at the statue of Lincoln on the capitol’s west side.

After the Civil War, the Grand Army of the Republic was formed as the first-ever fraternal organization for veterans. In 1881 the Grand Army of the Republic created the Sons of Union Veterans to carry on the memory and traditions of the G.A.R. after the last G.A.R. members were gone.

Today, the Sons of Union Veterans are recognized by Congress as a Veterans’ organization, charged with keeping alive the memory of those who served our country during the Civil War, 1861 to 1865. Their presence on Tuesday was an excellent reminder of our nation’s history and of President Lincoln’s work to keep the United States together.

Sarpy Leadership Day

Tuesday February 12th was also Leadership Sarpy Day at the Legislature. Each year the Sarpy County Chamber of Commerce sponsors an 11-month program to help Sarpy residents develop leadership skills that they can utilize in our community. As part of the program, the group spends a day at the Unicameral hearing from representatives of the various state government branches. This year the group heard from several legislative committee chairs and the Sarpy senator delegation and two Supreme Court judges. If you are interested in participating in next year’s Leadership Sarpy class, you can find more information here.

Papillion School Group

A group of students from Papillion Middle School, Liberty Middle School, and La Vista Middle School visited the capitol on Thursday as part of a program on government. Senator John Arch and I joined them briefly on their building tour to welcome them to the capitol and talk about our work as senators.

I know I saw several interested faces when I reminded them that any one of them – in a few years, of course – can serve in our legislature. They also spoke to Senator Carol Blood over lunch. I hope they enjoyed their time in Lincoln, and I trust they learned a lot.

OLLI Unicameral Class

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) is a program at UNL for adults 50 years or older to take weekly classes in everything from salsa dancing to diabetes health to basketball bracketology. On Thursday February 14th I spoke to enrollees in the class “One of a Kind: Nebraska’s Unique Legislature” about how I decided to run for office, the greatest achievements and challenges of my time in the Legislature, and some of the key issues the Unicameral is talking about this year. I always enjoy speaking to this group and this year was no different. If you want to learn more about OLLI, you can check out the program’s website and brochure here.

Opening Prayer

I served as the Legislature’s Chaplain of the Day on Valentine’s Day, so I chose to speak briefly on the power of love in our lives. I deeply value the support of all my family and other loved ones, and I wish the best to you and yours!

Presidents’ Day Office Closure

All state offices, including my own, will be closed on Monday February 18th in observance of Presidents’ Day. If you need assistance that day, please send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Floor Debate and Bills Advanced

This week the Legislature was highly productive in our morning debate sessions. We voted to advance a number of important bills. Some of those bills include:

My LB 306 was discussed and advanced in the middle of the week. LB 306 adds family caregiving responsibilities to the list of reasons that a person can leave a job “for good cause” so that they are eligible for unemployment. We added a provision that employees need to have spoken to their employers to try to make accommodations before they quit. We certainly encourage employers and employees to seek understanding and accomodation when a family member is sick, as retaining employment is often a vital financial lifeline for caregivers and good for business stability. But if that is not possible with the demands of the job or the care needed, that employee can get some assistance while they apply for a job that would accommodate their caregiving needs.

We also discussed and unanimously advanced Senator Justin Wayne’s LR 1CA, a proposed constitutional amendment that will remove a clause in our state constitution that still allows slavery as punishment for a crime. No such sentence has been handed down since the 1940s, and it is important that our constitution is updated to confirm that slavery in any situation is inhumane and against every value we hold dear. While sometimes our law books contain outdated and defunct references that are effectively ignored, such a glaring stain on our collective history deserves no place in our state’s core legal foundation. Once the Legislature approves LR 1CA it will appear on the next general election ballot in 2020 to be confirmed by the voters.

Senator Tom Brewer introduced LB 154 after working with Judi gaishkibos of the Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs, Senator Patty Pansing Brooks, and many others. The bill authorizes a comprehensive 2-year state study on missing Native American women and children, who go missing at a significantly higher rate than do other demographic groups. This study will provide key information about why these crimes occur at such a high rate and, crucially, what the state can do to support efforts by our own law enforcement, tribal governments, and nonprofits to stem the tide.

Another bill we discussed was LB 192. Introduced by Senator John McCollister, it allows National Guard and Reserve veterans to be recognized through our existing veteran designation on our driver’s licenses and state identification cards. This recognizes the service of those who have served in the National Guard and Reserves.  

Bill Hearings This Week

This was a busy week for my office. Of the 22 bills I introduced, we had public hearings for more than one quarter of them just this week! Those bills were:

On Monday February 4th the Business and Labor Committee heard two of my bills, both focused on employee well-being and productivity. LB 305 creates the “Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act” and requires employers with four or more employees to provide employees with one hour of “sick and safe” leave for every thirty hours worked. Safe leave can be used by employees experiencing domestic violence or stalking. The second bill, LB 311, creates the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act. PFMLA will provide time off with partial wage replacement for qualifying reasons for all workers covered by unemployment insurance: six weeks to care for a family member with a serious health condition or a military family member preparing for or returning from deployment, and twelve weeks to care for a new child or for one’s own health condition. Channel 3 News did a great story on LB 311, which you can find here.

We had a third hearing on Monday – LB 235 in the General Affairs Committee. This bill allows for those making home brewed alcohol to serve samples at festivals and fundraisers without a permit, as long as they are not selling the samples and the event is legally conducted under the Nebraska Liquor Control Act. Monday was definitely the busiest day in a hectic week.


(L-R) Bryan Dort, Matthew Misfeldt, and Gwyn Evans came to testify in favor of LB 235

On Tuesday February 5th the Urban Affairs Committee discussed LB 124, which clarifies that municipalities can jointly administer a clean energy assessment district under the Property Assessment Clean Energy Act, or PACE program. This is a “cleanup” bill for legislation that was passed several years back.

We had a break from hearings on Wednesday and Thursday, then went right back to it on Friday February 8th. Over the noon our the Executive Board heard LB 566 which requires the department of insurance to inform the legislature before they seek a waiver and then seek legislative approval prior to implementing a 1332 Waiver, or “state innovation” waiver. State innovation waivers allow states to manipulate the types of health plans that are available on the ACA marketplace, so this bill would provide important oversight and protection for Nebraskans.

Last, the Revenue Committee discussed LB 123. This bill fixes an issue for the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired. A current requirement in the Taxpayer Transparency Act requires them to publish information about their contracts with individuals receiving services online, which is in conflict with the Commission’s confidentiality policies. The Commission brought this bill to me and I was happy to introduce it for them.

Now my office has a bit of a break, as our next bill hearing is not scheduled until February 21st. Committee hearings will continue until the end of March, with the Legislature tentatively scheduled to begin all-day floor debate on April 2nd. As always, you can find the full list of committee hearings here.

Legislative Performance Audit Committee

This biennium I was appointed to the Legislative Performance Audit Committee and had the honor of being elected Vice Chair by the other members. The Performance Audit Committee is charged with giving oversight and policy guidance to the Legislative Performance Audit office, which is staffed with professional full-time auditing staff. Unlike the State Auditor’s office, which looks at agencies’ financial activities to ensure they’re following state and federal law, the Performance Audit office evaluates agencies and their programs to determine how well legislative intent is being implemented. Their job is in their name – to audit agencies’ performance and check whether, and how well, they’re doing what the Legislature has asked them to.

This week the Performance Audit Committee met to discuss our priorities for the biennium. The Performance Audit office has some state programs that it is statutorily required to audit on a revolving schedule, but otherwise has broad discretion to investigate programs at senators’ request. Sometimes that’s because an agency has been in the news for questionable practices, but just as often it’s simply because a senator is curious about a program’s inner workings or thinking about potential program changes.

President’s Day Office Closure

All state offices, including my own, will be closed on Monday February 18th in observance of President’s Day. If you need assistance that day, please send me an email or call my office and leave a voicemail.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Bill Debate Begins

This week marked the start of bill debate each morning. The Unicameral’s unique structure means that every introduced bill must have a public hearing, and that the public must have at least one week’s notice before the hearing is held. That means that the bills we’re debating on the floor now were mostly introduced in the first few days of session, then had quick hearings last week, and were non-controversial or simple enough that the committees acted on them expeditiously. My LB 121 and LB 305, discussed below, both fall into those categories. LB 121 passed on General File Friday morning after a short debate.

At the beginning of the biennium, bills are debated in what’s known as worksheet order. That means bills come up for debate in the same order that committees report them out to the floor, without needing any kind of priority designation from a senator. That quick turn-around is one reason that senators often try to get bills introduced in the first couple of days when the session starts. At this point in the session that worksheet doesn’t have very many bills on it – when General File debate of bills began Friday January 25th last week, we got through the whole worksheet (which held a whopping four bills at the time). This week, when we spent all four days debating bills in the morning, we took up a further 13 bills spread from Monday to Thursday this week and 14 more on Friday alone. That trickle of bills will soon turn into a flood as committee hearings continue and more bills are reported out. If you’re curious to see where bills are in the process, you can access each day’s worksheet by going to the Legislative Calendar (here), clicking on today’s date, and opening the worksheet link under “Legislative Activity.”

PFML and Military Retirement Bill Hearings

Two big bill hearings will take place next week on Monday February 4th and Thursday February 7th. The first, on Monday in the Business & Labor Committee, is my LB 311 to enact the Paid Family and Medical Leave state insurance program. This bill would extend access to paid family and medical leave to the vast majority of working Nebraskans through a small tax on employers – similar to the unemployment insurance system.

The Thursday hearing will be on LB 153 in the Government, Military & Veterans Affairs Committee. Senator Brewer’s bill would exempt 50% of military retirement from state income tax for all veterans filing their return in Nebraska, not just recent retirees. I have been working for such an exemption for as long as I have been in the Legislature, and I am hopeful that we can get LB 153 passed this year. With the Governor’s backing and a broad coalition of senators already signed on in support, we will work to make Nebraska even more welcoming for our veteran families.

If you would like to watch either of these hearings, or any other public business conducted by the Legislature, you are always welcome to come to the capitol and watch. For those of you who can’t make it in person, all committee hearings and legislative debates are streamed online by NET. You can find those live streams here, and can always check hearing schedules and our daily debate agenda at the legislature’s website here.

Bill Hearings This Week

The week of January 28th I had three public hearings for bills I introduced. The first was LB 306, which the Business & Labor Committee heard on Monday and advanced to the full Legislature on Thursday. Under current law, Nebraska workers are only eligible for unemployment if they are out of work through no fault of their own, or unless they had “good cause” for voluntarily leaving employment.  This adds caregiving for a family member with a serious health need to the list of reasons that are considered “good cause” for leaving employment. LB 306 allows caregivers to be eligible for unemployment benefits once they begin actively seeking work again. That may be because their caregiving duties have changed or ended, or because they are seeking a job on the night shift, for example – no matter the situation, this bill recognizes that uncompensated caregiving is often not a choice but a necessity, and will help caregivers financially once they are ready to return to the workforce. I am very pleased that the Business & Labor Committee acted so swiftly on LB 306, and I look forward to discussing the bill’s merits with my colleagues in the full Legislature.

My next hearing was on Tuesday January 29th and discussed LB 121. The bill addresses the limits on borrowing from banks by cities or municipalities. It specifies that loans are repaid in installments for a period of up to seven years and extends the limitations on borrowing for second-class cities. This bill was approved by the Urban Affairs Committee and was already debated and advanced on the first round of debate in the full Legislature on Friday February 1st.

Last was LB 322, which was heard in the Judiciary Committee on Friday February 1st. The bill deals with tobacco compliance checks performed by law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions and establishes a uniform process for those checks statewide. Compliance checks allow law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions to work with young people to test whether retailers are selling tobacco products to under-18s. We had a good hearing and I am hopeful LB 322 will be advanced to the full legislature quickly.


After the LB 322 hearing with Autumn Sky Burns, who first brought the bill to our attention and testified as a proponent at the hearing

Tele-Town Hall 

On Thursday January 31st I joined AARP of Nebraska for a tele-town hall about caregiving and paid family and medical leave. We had approximately 4000 Nebraskans on the phone over the course of the town hall, and had some great discussion about the importance of family caregiving and the challenges faced by workers who need time off to care for their or a family member’s health. Thank you to everyone who was able to join the call or follow along on the Facebook stream!  


Taking calls with Jina Ragland of AARP Nebraska

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Upcoming Tele-Town Hall

On January 31st I will be holding a tele-town hall with AARP to discuss paid family and medical leave and Nebraskans’ experiences with caregiving. The phone lines will be active from 6:00-7:00 pm that evening.

The call will also be streamed on AARP’s Facebook Live page, which you can access here. If you would like to participate in this tele-town hall, please click here to register. Click on the Paid Family Caregiving and Medical Leave” page under Events. You will be asked to provide your name, phone number, and email so that AARP can call you the night of the event and patch you in to the town hall. I look forward to speaking with everyone who is able to participate.

Bill Tracking Tool

My colleagues and I introduced 739 bills this year, which I’ve heard is the highest number for a 1st session for over a decade. There are also seven constitutional amendment resolutions and four other substantive resolutions, though resolutions can still be introduced after the first 10 days so those numbers will grow. If there are particular bills in that collection that you want to keep track of, our bill tracking tool is a great way to do so! You can sign up for the bill tracker here.

The Bill Tracker tool allows you to receive updates on up to 15 bills at a time for free or to sign up for a premium account to track an unlimited number of bills. If you check the box to receive email updates you will be sent a notification when a bill you selected is scheduled for a public hearing and when it is advanced through each round of debate.

Week 3 Bill Introduction

This week I introduced five more bills for a total of 22. You can see the full list of my bills here.  Below is a short summary of what I introduced this week; if you would like more information on any of these proposals, or if you would like to testify at a public hearing, please get in touch.

LB 439 requires that Medicaid cover at least 24 chiropractic treatments per benefit year.  

LB 566 requires the department of insurance to seek legislative approval and authorization prior to applying for and/or implementing a 1332 Waiver, or “state innovation” waiver.  State innovation waivers allow states to manipulate the types of health plans that are available on the ACA marketplace.

LB 613 is a bill I introduced based on the recommendations of Economic Development Task Force’s 2018 report. The bill effectively changes the end date of the New Markets Tax Credit, Historic Tax Credit, and Beginning Farmer Tax Credit from 2022 to July 2019. I introduced this bill as part of the wider discussion about Nebraska’s economic development framework, and hope the hearing will be an opportunity to assess these three programs.

LB 614 is a “revenue raiser package” aimed at providing property tax relief.  It provides additional revenue to school districts by eliminating some corporate deductions and exclusions, increasing taxes on cigarettes, soft drinks, candy, and bottled water, and ending the tangible personal property tax exemption.  Providing relief to school districts will drive local property taxes down. This is one of the many proposals that have been introduced this year, and I look forward to be at the table for discussions regarding property tax relief as a member of the revenue committee.  

LB 714 is the other bill that grew out of the Economic Development Task Force’s work in 2018. The bill creates the Nebraska Industrial New Job-Training Act and would provide an avenue to help fund train new employee training.

Education Press Conference

I joined with legislative colleagues and educational advocates on Friday morning for a press conference to highlight bills and budget proposals that will have a positive impact on K-12 education in Nebraska. Those bills included proposals on mental and behavioral health, student nutrition, early childhood education, career education, special education, and school safety.

I discussed LB 120, a bill of mine to improve mental health education options for teachers in our schools.  

Bill Hearings Begin

This week marked the start of public bill hearings, and I had one scheduled for the very first day. On Tuesday January 22nd the Education Committee held its hearing on LB 122. This bill brings Nebraska into legal compliance with recent federal policy changes by providing that veterans receiving vocational rehabilitation & education services through the VA will receive in-state resident tuition rates as long as they’re living here. I brought this bill at the request of the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is one of a number of bills introduced this year that will make Nebraska a better place for military members, veterans and their families to live.

You can find the schedule for bill hearings here. Committees must give at least one week’s notice to the public before a hearing, so the schedule will continue to be updated as the session progresses.

Permanent Rules Approved

On Tuesday and Wednesday this week the Legislature debated and approved our permanent rules. Two small changes were made: the first of which allows the Legislature’s Planning Committee to designate one priority bill each session, and a second which prevents a bill from being killed by unanimous consent without the introducer’s knowledge. Unlike in 2017, where the rules debate dragged on for fully half of the first session, this year’s discussion was concise and business-like. I hope this is a sign of good things to come in the 106th Legislature – a signal that the body is ready to rediscover the habits of collegiality and mutual understanding that sometimes seemed to be lacking last session.

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

PFML Press Conference 

On Tuesday January 15th Senator Machaela Cavanaugh and I hosted a press conference to announce our sponsorship of the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act. We were joined by friends and advocates who work with a wide variety of Nebraskans, from babies to working families to the elderly. The Nebraska Legislature’s nonpartisan structure makes these issue coalitions extremely important.

I want to thank everyone who was able to attend and show their support for LB 311, as well as all those who have emailed or called to share how important paid leave policies are to you. If you are interested in advocating for the bill, please contact my office.

Week 2 Bill Introduction

This week we had five full days of bill introduction, bringing the total introduced since last week to over 400 bills and several constitutional amendments. I introduced a further 10 bills this week. They are:

LB 235 allows for those making home brewed alcohol to serve samples at festivals and fundraisers without a permit, so long as they are not selling the samples and the event is legally conducted under the Nebraska Liquor Control Act.

LB 236 – Provides that municipalities who have adopted the Nebraska Advantage Transformational Tourism and Redevelopment Act can receive information on the sales and use tax returns for retailers located within a redevelopment area via secure electronic means from the Nebraska Department of Revenue.

LB 237 – Restores a .5% monthly commission to counties across the state for all motor vehicle sales tax collections over $3,000. This is part of my efforts to address unfunded mandates to counties, and supporting our counties is an important part of the property tax equation.  

LB 304 is similar to the Cottage Foods Law I introduced last year (LB764). The bill allows producers of non-potentially hazardous foods, or cottage food producers, to sell the same foods they can already sell at farmers markets from their homes or at public events so long as food are properly labeled and producers follow the food safety regulations of the county.  This includes items that are not time/temperature controlled for safety, such as baked goods, jams and jellies, and fresh produce.

LB 305 or the “Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act” requires employers with four or more employees to provide employees with one hour of “sick and safe” leave for every thirty hours worked.  Employers who choose to provide comparable benefits to employees on their own can be exempt from this requirement. Safe leave can be used by employees experiencing domestic violence or stalking.  

LB 306 allows caregivers to be eligible for unemployment benefits until they are able to return to work.  Under current law, Nebraska workers are only eligible for unemployment if they are out of work through no fault of their own, or unless they had “good cause” for voluntarily leaving employment.  This adds caregiving for a family member with a serious health need to the list of reasons that are considered “good cause” for leaving employment.

LB 311 is the Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act, mentioned above. The Act will provide time off with partial wage replacement for qualifying reasons for all workers covered by unemployment insurance. The bill provides six weeks to care for a family member with a serious health condition or a military family member preparing for or returning from deployment, and twelve weeks to care for a new child or for one’s own health condition.  Nebraskans value our families and our workers who contribute to a growing economy and thriving communities, and this Act will result in healthier families at home and more productive employees at work.

LB 322 establishes a uniform process for tobacco compliance checks performed by law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions.  Tobacco compliance checks allow law enforcement and tobacco prevention coalitions to work with young people to test whether tobacco sellers are unlawfully providing tobacco to underage persons.  

LB 323 amends eligibility criteria for Nebraska’s Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MIWD) program.  This program allows individuals with disabilities to pay a premium for, or “buy-in” to Medicaid coverage while working and earning an income that puts them over the traditional eligibility threshold.  Current eligibility criteria is outdated and prevents persons who should otherwise qualify from participating in the program.

LB 365 creates a centralized registry where Nebraskans can store advance healthcare directives, or instructions containing their wishes for end-of-life medical treatment, where it can be accessed by a medical professional when necessary.  

Meet Our Intern – Lillian Butler-Hale 

Our intern for this legislative session is Lillian Butler-Hale from Fort Collins, Colorado. Lillian is a junior at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln studying Sociology, Spanish and Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. Though she has cherished her time at Nebraska she hopes to return to Colorado for law school after graduation, where she can hike, ski and camp more often. When she is not studying or working, she loves to sing, watch movies and spend time with any/all dogs or babies. She is involved with the Student Ethics Board and is a member of Alpha Phi.

Lillian’s responsibilities here at the capitol include assisting with administrative tasks, doing research and helping Christina and Hanna. We are excited to have her and look forward to an especially productive 2019!

Rules Committee Hearing

Last week I was elected Chair of the Rules Committee. The committee held its public hearing on Wednesday January 16th to discuss the proposed rule changes submitted by senators last week. We then met in executive session to discuss the proposals in more depth. On Friday the Committee reported its recommendations to the full Legislature, and I anticipate that we will begin debate on those proposals on Tuesday January 22nd.

Capitol Visitors – Mission Middle School

On Tuesday January 15th a group of students from Mission Middle School visited the capitol, and I was very happy to be able to meet them. They are participating in a national history contest and came to Lincoln to do some research in the State Archives. Their projects are about the history of women’s suffrage, organ donation, the Holocaust, the history and invention of airplanes, and the first tornado forecast.

This creative group are a great representation of the good things going on in our schools, and I wish them the best with their competition!

Stay Up to Date with What’s Happening in the Legislature

  • You are welcome to come visit my Capitol office in Lincoln. My office is room 1012, and can be found on the first floor in the northwest corner of the building.
  • If you would like to receive my e-newsletter, you can sign up here. These go out weekly on Saturday mornings during session, and monthly during the interim.
  • You can also follow me on Facebook (here) or Twitter (@SenCrawford).
  • You can watch legislative debate and committee hearings live on NET Television or find NET’s live stream here.
  • You can always contact my office directly with questions or concerns at scrawford@leg.ne.gov or (402)471-2615.

All the best,

Sen. Sue Crawford

District 45
Room #1012
P.O. Box 94604
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-2615
Email: scrawford@leg.ne.gov
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